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Irmansyah Irmansyah 1 Article
Number of comorbidities and the risk of delay in seeking treatment for coronary heart disease: a longitudinal study in Bogor City, Indonesia
Sulistyowati Tuminah, Lely Indrawati, Woro Riyadina, Tri Wurisastuti, Alfons M. Letelay, Nikson Sitorus, Alifa S. Putri, Siti Isfandari, Irmansyah Irmansyah
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2024;15(3):201-211.   Published online June 27, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2023.0337
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Objectives
The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the number of patient comorbidities and the delays in seeking treatment for coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods: This longitudinal study utilized secondary data from the Non-Communicable Disease Risk Factor (NCDRF) cohort study conducted in Bogor City. Individuals who participated in the NCDRF cohort study and were diagnosed with CHD within the 6-year study period met the inclusion criteria. Respondents who were not continuously monitored up to the 6th year were excluded. The final sample included data from respondents with CHD who participated in the NCDRF cohort study and were monitored for the full 6-year duration. The final logistic regression analysis was conducted on data collected from 812 participants. Results: Among the participants with CHD, 702 out of 812 exhibited a delay in seeking treatment. The risk of a delay in seeking treatment was significantly higher among individuals without comorbidities, with an odds ratio (OR) of 3.5 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.735–7.036; p<0.001). Among those with a single comorbidity, the risk of delay in seeking treatment was still notable (OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.259–5.418; p=0.010) when compared to those with 2 or more comorbidities. These odds were adjusted for age, sex, education level, and health insurance status. Conclusion: The proportion of patients with CHD who delayed seeking treatment was high, particularly among individuals with no comorbidities. Low levels of comorbidity also appeared to correlate with a greater tendency to delay in seeking treatment.

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives