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Nikson Sitorus 2 Articles
Number of comorbidities and the risk of delay in seeking treatment for coronary heart disease: a longitudinal study in Bogor City, Indonesia
Sulistyowati Tuminah, Lely Indrawati, Woro Riyadina, Tri Wurisastuti, Alfons M. Letelay, Nikson Sitorus, Alifa S. Putri, Siti Isfandari, Irmansyah Irmansyah
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2024;15(3):201-211.   Published online June 27, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2023.0337
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Objectives
The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the number of patient comorbidities and the delays in seeking treatment for coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods: This longitudinal study utilized secondary data from the Non-Communicable Disease Risk Factor (NCDRF) cohort study conducted in Bogor City. Individuals who participated in the NCDRF cohort study and were diagnosed with CHD within the 6-year study period met the inclusion criteria. Respondents who were not continuously monitored up to the 6th year were excluded. The final sample included data from respondents with CHD who participated in the NCDRF cohort study and were monitored for the full 6-year duration. The final logistic regression analysis was conducted on data collected from 812 participants. Results: Among the participants with CHD, 702 out of 812 exhibited a delay in seeking treatment. The risk of a delay in seeking treatment was significantly higher among individuals without comorbidities, with an odds ratio (OR) of 3.5 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.735–7.036; p<0.001). Among those with a single comorbidity, the risk of delay in seeking treatment was still notable (OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.259–5.418; p=0.010) when compared to those with 2 or more comorbidities. These odds were adjusted for age, sex, education level, and health insurance status. Conclusion: The proportion of patients with CHD who delayed seeking treatment was high, particularly among individuals with no comorbidities. Low levels of comorbidity also appeared to correlate with a greater tendency to delay in seeking treatment.
Chronic kidney disease in Indonesia: evidence from a national health survey
Puti Sari Hidayangsih, Dwi Hapsari Tjandrarini, Noor Edi Widya Sukoco, Nikson Sitorus, Ika Dharmayanti, Feri Ahmadi
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2023;14(1):23-30.   Published online February 14, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0290
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Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Several previous studies have stated that consuming certain foods and beverages might increase the risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD). This study aimed to examine the relationships of food and beverage consumption with other risk factors for CKD. Methods: Data sources included the 2018 Basic Health Research (Riskesdas) and the National Socio-Economic Survey (Susenas), which were analyzed using a cross-sectional design. The study samples were households from 34 provinces in Indonesia, and the analysis was performed with provincial aggregates. Data were analyzed using risk factor analysis followed by linear regression to identify relationships with CKD. Results: The prevalence of CKD in Indonesia was 0.38%. The province with the highest prevalence was North Kalimantan (0.64%), while the lowest was found in West Sulawesi (0.18%). Five major groups were formed from 15 identified risk factors using factor analysis. A linear regression model presented 1 significant selected factor (p=0.006, R2 =31%). The final model of risk factors included water quality, consumption of fatty foods, and a history of diabetes. Conclusion: Drinking water quality, fatty food consumption, and diabetes are associated with CKD. There is a need to monitor drinking water, as well as to promote health education and provide comprehensive services for people with diabetes, to prevent CKD.

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives