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Original Articles
A spatial analysis of the association between social vulnerability and the cumulative number of confirmed deaths from COVID-19 in United States counties through November 14, 2020
Baksun Sung
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(3):149-157.   Published online June 2, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.0372
  • 4,185 View
  • 140 Download
  • 3 Citations
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is classified as a natural hazard, and social vulnerability describes the susceptibility of social groups to potential damages from natural hazards. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the association between social vulnerability and the cumulative number of confirmed COVID-19 deaths (per 100,000) in 3,141 United States counties.
Methods
The cumulative number of COVID-19 deaths was obtained from USA Facts. Variables related to social vulnerability were obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Social Vulnerability Index and the 2018 5-Year American Community Survey. Data were analyzed using spatial autoregression models.
Results
Lowest income and educational level, as well as high proportions of single parent households, mobile home residents, and people without health insurance were positively associated with a high cumulative number of COVID-19 deaths.
Conclusion
In conclusion, there are regional differences in the cumulative number of COVID-19 deaths in United States counties, which are affected by various social vulnerabilities. Hence, these findings underscore the need to take social vulnerability into account when planning interventions to reduce COVID-19 deaths.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Social vulnerability and COVID-19 in Maringá, Brazil
    Matheus Pereira Libório, Oseias da Silva Martinuci, Patrícia Bernardes, Natália Cristina Alves Caetano Chav Krohling, Guilherme Castro, Henrique Leonardo Guerra, Eduardo Alcantara Ribeiro, Udelysses Janete Veltrini Fonzar, Ícaro da Costa Francisco
    Spatial Information Research.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Global mapping of epidemic risk assessment toolkits: A scoping review for COVID-19 and future epidemics preparedness implications
    Bach Xuan Tran, Long Hoang Nguyen, Linh Phuong Doan, Tham Thi Nguyen, Giang Thu Vu, Hoa Thi Do, Huong Thi Le, Carl A. Latkin, Cyrus S. H. Ho, Roger C. M. Ho, Md Nazirul Islam Sarker
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(9): e0272037.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 mortality and deprivation: pandemic, syndemic, and endemic health inequalities
    Victoria J McGowan, Clare Bambra
    The Lancet Public Health.2022; 7(11): e966.     CrossRef
Gender Difference in the Association Between E-Cigarette Use and Depression among US Adults
Baksun Sung
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(1):13-19.   Published online February 23, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.12.1.03
  • 6,205 View
  • 116 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The objective of this study was to determine the association between e-cigarette use and depression and examine how this association is different by gender among US adults.

Methods

Data from the 2017 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and Selected Metropolitan/Micropolitan Area Risk Trends was used, and included 174,351 of 230,875 US adults aged 18 years and older. Data were analyzed using the multivariate logistic regression models.

Results

After adjusting for age, race, education, income, marital status, employment status, smoking status, and physical activity, firstly, “current daily e-cigarette users” (AOR = 2.487, p < 0.001), “current non-daily e-cigarette users” (AOR = 1.623, p < 0.001), and “former e-cigarette users” (AOR = 1.573, p < 0.001) were associated with increased odds of depression compared with “never e-cigarette users.” Secondly, women were associated with increased odds of depression compared with men (AOR = 1.797, p < 0.001). Finally, male “current daily e-cigarette users” (AOR = 1.366, p < 0.01) were associated with increased odds of depression compared with female “never e-cigarette users.”

Conclusion

Thus, even though women tend to be more vulnerable to depression compared with men, e-cigarette use was positively associated with depression among both men and women.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association between e-cigarette use behaviors and perceived harmfulness of e-cigarettes and anxiety/depression symptoms among Black/African American Adults
    David Adzrago, Kayo Fujimoto, Melissa B. Harrell, Antwan Jones, J. Michael Wilkerson
    Preventive Medicine Reports.2023; 31: 102080.     CrossRef
  • Use of electronic vaping products and mental health among adolescent high school students in the United States: The moderating effect of sex
    Philip Baiden, Hannah S. Szlyk, Patricia Cavazos-Rehg, Henry K. Onyeaka, JaNiene E. Peoples, Erin Kasson
    Journal of Psychiatric Research.2022; 147: 24.     CrossRef
Multilevel Analysis of Socio-Demographic Disparities in Adulthood Obesity Across the United States Geographic Regions
Baksun Sung, Amin Etemadifar
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(3):137-144.   Published online June 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.3.04
  • 3,562 View
  • 47 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The objective of this study was to examine the socio-demographic disparities in obesity among US adults across 130 metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas.

Methods

This study used data from the 2015 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and Selected Metropolitan/Micropolitan Area Risk Trend of 159,827 US adults aged 18 years and older. Data were analyzed using the multilevel linear regression models.

Results

According to individual level analyses, socio-demographic disparities in obesity exist in the United States. Individuals with low socioeconomic status were associated with a higher body mass index. The participants from the Midwest United States tend to have higher body mass index than those who from the South. According to metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area level analyses, secondly, there were significant differences in obesity status between different areas and the relation of obesity with 5 socio-demographic factors varied across different areas. According to geospatial mapping analyses, even though obesity status by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area level has improved overtime, differences in body mass index between United States regions are increasing from 2007 to 2015.

Conclusion

Socio-demographic and regional disparities in obesity status persist among US adults. Hence, these findings underscore the need to take socio-environmental factors into account when planning obesity prevention on vulnerable populations and areas.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)-Authorized Grocery, Convenience, Dollar, and Restaurant or Delivery Service Settings Are Associated With Increased Obesity Prevalence in Virginia
    Bailey Houghtaling, David Kniola, Sarah Misyak
    American Journal of Health Promotion.2021; 35(1): 127.     CrossRef
  • The effects of the built environment on the general health, physical activity and obesity of adults in Queensland, Australia
    Siqin Wang, Yan Liu, Jack Lam, Mei-Po Kwan
    Spatial and Spatio-temporal Epidemiology.2021; 39: 100456.     CrossRef
  • Exposure to air pollutants and the gut microbiota: a potential link between exposure, obesity, and type 2 diabetes
    Maximillian J. Bailey, Noopur N. Naik, Laura E. Wild, William B. Patterson, Tanya L. Alderete
    Gut Microbes.2020; 11(5): 1188.     CrossRef

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives