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Brief Report
The laboratory test procedure to confirm rotavirus vaccine infection in severe complex immunodeficiency patients
Su-Jin Chae, Seung-Rye Cho, Wooyoung Choi, Myung-Guk Han, Deog-Yong Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(4):269-273.   Published online August 13, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0079
  • 2,592 View
  • 65 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
The rotavirus vaccine is a live vaccine, and there is a possibility of infection by the virus strain used in the vaccine. We investigated the process of determining whether an infection was caused by the vaccine strain in a severe complex immunodeficiency (SCID) patient with rotavirus infection. The patient was vaccinated with RotaTeq prior to being diagnosed with SCID. The testing process was conducted in the following order: confirming rotavirus infection, determining its genotype, and confirming the vaccine strain. Rotavirus infection was confirmed through enzyme immunoassay and VP6 gene detection. G1 and P[8] were identified by multiplex polymerase chain reaction for the genotype, and G3 was further identified using a single primer. By detecting the fingerprint gene (WC3) of RotaTeq, it was confirmed that the detected virus was the vaccine strain. Genotypes G1 and P[8] were identified, and the infection was suspected of having been caused by rotavirus G1P[8]. G1P[8] is the most commonly detected genotype worldwide and is not included in the recombinant strains used in vaccines. Therefore, the infection was confirmed to have been caused by the vaccine strain by analyzing the genetic relationship between VP4 and VP7. Rotavirus infection by the vaccine strain can be identified through genotyping and fingerprint gene detection. However, genetic linkage analysis will also help to identify vaccine strains.
Short Communication
Detection of Novel Coronavirus on the Surface of Environmental Materials Contaminated by COVID-19 Patients in the Republic of Korea
Sang-Eun Lee, Deog-Yong Lee, Wook-Gyo Lee, ByeongHak Kang, Yoon Suk Jang, Boyeong Ryu, SeungJae Lee, Hyunjung Bahk, Eungyu Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(3):128-132.   Published online May 8, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.3.03
  • 6,586 View
  • 267 Download
  • 20 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

This study aimed to determine the presence of SARS-CoV-2 on surfaces frequently touched by COVID-19 patients, and assess the scope of contamination and transmissibility in facilities where the outbreaks occurred. In the course of this epidemiological investigation, a total of 80 environmental specimens were collected from 6 hospitals (68 specimens) and 2 “mass facilities” (6 specimens from a rehabilitation center and 6 specimens from an apartment building complex). Specific reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction targeting of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and envelope genes, were used to identify the presence of this novel coronavirus. The 68 specimens from 6 hospitals (A, B, C, D, E, and G), where prior disinfection/cleaning had been performed before environmental sampling, tested negative for SARS-CoV-2. However, 2 out of 12 specimens (16.7%) from 2 “mass facilities” (F and H), where prior disinfection/cleaning had not taken place, were positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA polymerase, and envelope genes. These results suggest that prompt disinfection and cleaning of potentially contaminated surfaces is an effective infection control measure. By inactivating SARS-CoV-2 with disinfection/cleaning the infectivity and transmission of the virus is blocked. This investigation of environmental sampling may help in the understanding of risk assessment of the COVID-19 outbreak in “mass facilities” and provide guidance in using effective disinfectants on contaminated surfaces.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) research agenda for healthcare epidemiology
    Lona Mody, Ibukunoluwa C. Akinboyo, Hilary M. Babcock, Werner E. Bischoff, Vincent Chi-Chung Cheng, Kathleen Chiotos, Kimberly C. Claeys, K. C. Coffey, Daniel J. Diekema, Curtis J. Donskey, Katherine D. Ellingson, Heather M. Gilmartin, Shruti K. Gohil, An
    Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology.2022; 43(2): 156.     CrossRef
  • SARS-CoV-2 on Surfaces and HVAC Filters in Dormitory Rooms
    Jin Pan, Seth A. Hawks, Aaron J. Prussin, Nisha K. Duggal, Linsey C. Marr
    Environmental Science & Technology Letters.2022; 9(1): 71.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 Cluster Linked to Aerosol Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 via Floor Drains
    Taewon Han, Heedo Park, Yungje Jeong, Jungmin Lee, Eungyeong Shon, Man-Seong Park, Minki Sung
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases.2022; 225(9): 1554.     CrossRef
  • Environmental Contamination with SARS-CoV-2 in Hospital COVID Department: Antigen Test, Real-Time RT-PCR and Virus Isolation
    Urška Rozman, Lea Knez, Goran Novak, Jernej Golob, Anita Pulko, Mojca Cimerman, Matjaž Ocepek, Urška Kuhar, Sonja Šostar Turk
    COVID.2022; 2(8): 1050.     CrossRef
  • Using Environmental Sampling to Enable Zoonotic Pandemic Preparedness
    Avirup Sanyal, Sanskriti Agarwal, Uma Ramakrishnan, Kritika M. Garg, Balaji Chattopadhyay
    Journal of the Indian Institute of Science.2022; 102(2): 711.     CrossRef
  • Anforderungen an die Hygiene bei der Reinigung und Desinfektion von Flächen

    Bundesgesundheitsblatt - Gesundheitsforschung - Ge.2022; 65(10): 1074.     CrossRef
  • SARS-CoV-2 pandemic: a review of molecular diagnostic tools including sample collection and commercial response with associated advantages and limitations
    Harikrishnan Jayamohan, Christopher J. Lambert, Himanshu J. Sant, Alexander Jafek, Dhruv Patel, Haidong Feng, Michael Beeman, Tawsif Mahmood, Ugochukwu Nze, Bruce K. Gale
    Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry.2021; 413(1): 49.     CrossRef
  • Contamination of inert surfaces by SARS-CoV-2: Persistence, stability and infectivity. A review
    Montse Marquès, José L. Domingo
    Environmental Research.2021; 193: 110559.     CrossRef
  • A Systematic Review of Surface Contamination, Stability, and Disinfection Data on SARS-CoV-2 (Through July 10, 2020)
    Noah Bedrosian, Elizabeth Mitchell, Elsa Rohm, Miguel Rothe, Christine Kelly, Gabrielle String, Daniele Lantagne
    Environmental Science & Technology.2021; 55(7): 4162.     CrossRef
  • Transmission of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 via Contaminated Surfaces: What Is to Be Done?
    Craig S Conover
    Clinical Infectious Diseases.2021; 72(11): 2062.     CrossRef
  • Investigation of SARS CoV-2 virus in environmental surface
    Abdollah Dargahi, Farhad Jeddi, Mehdi Vosoughi, Chiman Karami, Aidin Hadisi, S. Ahamad Mokhtari, Hasan Ghobadi, Morteza Alighadri, Somayeh Biparva Haghighi, Hadi Sadeghi
    Environmental Research.2021; 195: 110765.     CrossRef
  • Ist die Desinfektion öffentlicher Flächen zur Prävention von SARS-CoV-2 – infektionen sinnvoll?
    Günter Kampf, Lutz Jatzwauk
    Das Gesundheitswesen.2021; 83(03): 180.     CrossRef
  • SARS-CoV-2 Detection Rates from Surface Samples Do Not Implicate Public Surfaces as Relevant Sources for Transmission
    Günter Kampf, Stephanie Pfaender, Emanuel Goldman, Eike Steinmann
    Hygiene.2021; 1(1): 24.     CrossRef
  • The SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic in hospital: An insight into environmental surfaces contamination, disinfectants’ efficiency, and estimation of plastic waste production
    Faezeh seif, Zahra Noorimotlagh, Seyyed Abbas Mirzaee, Mojtaba Kalantar, Barat Barati, Mahdi Emamian Fard, Nozar Kalantar Fard
    Environmental Research.2021; 202: 111809.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 RNA on inanimate surfaces: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Simone Belluco, Marzia Mancin, Filippo Marzoli, Alessio Bortolami, Eva Mazzetto, Alessandra Pezzuto, Michela Favretti, Calogero Terregino, Francesco Bonfante, Roberto Piro
    European Journal of Epidemiology.2021; 36(7): 685.     CrossRef
  • Management following the first confirmed case of SARS-CoV-2 in a domestic cat associated with a massive outbreak in South Korea
    Taewon Han, Boyeong Ryu, Suyeon Lee, Yugyeong Song, Yoongje Jeong, Ilhwan Kim, Jeongmin Kim, Eunjin Kim, Wonjun Lee, Hyunju Lee, Haekyoung Hwang
    One Health.2021; 13: 100328.     CrossRef
  • Non-Respiratory Droplet Transmission of COVID-19 in the Isolation Ward of a Secondary Hospital in Oman
    Zayid K. Al Mayahi, Nawal Al Kindi, Nasser Al Shaqsi, Noaman Al Hattali, Azza Al Hattali, Khalid Salim, Mark Beatty
    Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice.2021; 29(6): e371.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of antiviral metal and metal oxide thin-film coatings against human coronavirus 229E
    Louis-Vincent Delumeau, Hatameh Asgarimoghaddam, Tamiru Alkie, Alexander James Bryan Jones, Samantha Lum, Kissan Mistry, Marc G. Aucoin, Stephanie DeWitte-Orr, Kevin P. Musselman
    APL Materials.2021; 9(11): 111114.     CrossRef
  • Rapid Review of SARS-CoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2 Viability, Susceptibility to Treatment, and the Disinfection and Reuse of PPE, Particularly Filtering Facepiece Respirators
    José G. B. Derraik, William A. Anderson, Elizabeth A. Connelly, Yvonne C. Anderson
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2020; 17(17): 6117.     CrossRef
  • Potential sources, modes of transmission and effectiveness of prevention measures against SARS-CoV-2
    G. Kampf, Y. Brüggemann, H.E.J. Kaba, J. Steinmann, S. Pfaender, S. Scheithauer, E. Steinmann
    Journal of Hospital Infection.2020; 106(4): 678.     CrossRef
Brief Reports
Emergence of Norovirus GII.17-associated Outbreak and Sporadic Cases in Korea from 2014 to 2015
Sunyoung Jung, Bo-Mi Hwang, HyunJu Jung, GyungTae Chung, Cheon-Kwon Yoo, Deog-Yong Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(1):86-90.   Published online February 28, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.1.12
  • 2,829 View
  • 22 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Human norovirus are major causative agent of nonbacterial acute gastroenteritis. In general, genogroup (G) II.4 is the most prominent major genotype that circulate in human population and the environment. However, a shift in genotypic trends was observed in Korea in December 2014. In this study, we investigated the trend of norovirus genotype in detail using the database of Acute Diarrhea Laboratory Surveillance (K-EnterNet) in Korea. GII.17 has since become a major contributor to outbreaks of norovirus-related infections and sporadic cases in Korea, although the reason for this shift remain unknown.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Epidemiology of Norovirus Outbreaks Reported to the Public Health Emergency Event Surveillance System, China, 2014–2017
    Yiyao Lian, Shuyu Wu, Li Luo, Bin Lv, Qiaohong Liao, Zhongjie Li, Jeanette J. Rainey, Aron J. Hall, Lu Ran
    Viruses.2019; 11(4): 342.     CrossRef
  • Nearly Complete Genome Sequence of a Human Norovirus GII.P17-GII.17 Strain Isolated from Brazil in 2015
    Cristina Santiso-Bellón, Azahara Fuentes-Trillo, Juliana da Silva Ribeiro de Andrade, Carolina Monzó, Susana Vila-Vicent, Roberto Gozalbo Rovira, Javier Buesa, Felipe J. Chaves, Marize Pereira Miagostovich, Jesús Rodríguez-Díaz, Jelle Matthijnssens
    Microbiology Resource Announcements.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Development of SNP Markers for Norovirus Related FUT2 Gene in Oyster
    守泉 闫
    Hans Journal of Biomedicine.2019; 09(03): 135.     CrossRef
  • Research on the contamination levels of norovirus in food facilities using groundwater in South Korea, 2015–2016
    Jeong Su Lee, In Sun Joo, Si Yeon Ju, Min Hee Jeong, Yun-Hee Song, Hyo Sun Kwak
    International Journal of Food Microbiology.2018; 280: 35.     CrossRef
  • Norovirus GII.17 Associated with a Foodborne Acute Gastroenteritis Outbreak in Brazil, 2016
    Juliana da Silva Ribeiro de Andrade, Tulio Machado Fumian, José Paulo Gagliardi Leite, Matheus Ribeiro de Assis, Alexandre Madi Fialho, Sergio Mouta, Cristiane Mendes Pereira Santiago, Marize Pereira Miagostovich
    Food and Environmental Virology.2018; 10(2): 212.     CrossRef
  • Phylogenetic characterization of norovirus strains detected from sporadic gastroenteritis in Seoul during 2014–2016
    Young Eun Kim, Miok Song, Jaein Lee, Hyun Jung Seung, Eun-Young Kwon, Jinkyung Yu, Youngok Hwang, Taeho Yoon, Tae Jun Park, In Kyoung Lim
    Gut Pathogens.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The prevalence of non-GII.4 norovirus genotypes in acute gastroenteritis outbreaks in Jinan, China
    Lanzheng Liu, Hengyun Guan, Ying Zhang, Chunrong Wang, Guoliang Yang, Shiman Ruan, Huailong Zhao, Xiuyun Han, Adriana Calderaro
    PLOS ONE.2018; 13(12): e0209245.     CrossRef
Occurrence of Norovirus GII.4 Sydney Variant-related Outbreaks in Korea
Sunyoung Jung, Bo-Mi Hwang, Hyun Ju Jeong, Gyung Tae Chung, Cheon-Kwon Yoo, Yeon-Ho Kang, Deog-Yong Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2015;6(5):322-326.   Published online October 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2015.10.004
  • 1,921 View
  • 17 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Human noroviruses are major causative agents of food and waterborne outbreaks of nonbacterial acute gastroenteritis. In this study, we report the epidemiological features of three outbreak cases of norovirus in Korea, and we describe the clinical symptoms and distribution of the causative genotypes. The incidence rates of the three outbreaks were 16.24% (326/2,007), 4.1% (27/656), and 16.8% (36/214), respectively. The patients in these three outbreaks were affected by acute gastroenteritis. These schools were provided unheated food from the same manufacturing company. Two genotypes (GII.3 and GII.4) of the norovirus were detected in these cases. Among them, major causative strains of GII.4 (Hu-jeju-47-2007KR-like) were identified in patients, food handlers, and groundwater from the manufacturing company of the unheated food. In the GII.4 (Hu-jeju-47-2007KR-like) strain of the norovirus, the nucleotide sequences were identical and identified as the GII.4 Sydney variant. Our data suggests that the combined epidemiological and laboratory results were closely related, and the causative pathogen was the GII.4 Sydney variant strain from contaminated groundwater.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A systematic review and meta-analysis indicates a substantial burden of human noroviruses in shellfish worldwide, with GII.4 and GII.2 being the predominant genotypes
    Yijing Li, Liang Xue, Junshan Gao, Weicheng Cai, Zilei Zhang, Luobing Meng, Shuidi Miao, Xiaojing Hong, Mingfang Xu, Qingping Wu, Jumei Zhang
    Food Microbiology.2023; 109: 104140.     CrossRef
  • Molecular epidemiology of norovirus infections in children with acute gastroenteritis in 2017–2019 in Tianjin, China
    Yulian Fang, Yanzhi Zhang, Hong Wang, Ouyan Shi, Wei Wang, Mengzhu Hou, Lu Wang, Jinying Wu, Yu Zhao
    Journal of Medical Virology.2022; 94(2): 616.     CrossRef
  • Assessment of potential infectivity of human norovirus in the traditional Korean salted clam product “Jogaejeotgal” by floating electrode-dielectric barrier discharge plasma
    Eun Bi Jeon, Man-Seok Choi, Ji Yoon Kim, Eun Ha Choi, Jun Sup Lim, Jinsung Choi, Kwang Soo Ha, Ji Young Kwon, Sang Hyeon Jeong, Shin Young Park
    Food Research International.2021; 141: 110107.     CrossRef
  • Characterizing the effects of thermal treatment on human norovirus GII.4 viability using propidium monoazide combined with RT-qPCR and quality assessments in mussels
    Eun Bi Jeon, Man-Seok Choi, Ji Yoon Kim, Kwang Soo Ha, Ji Young Kwon, Sung Hyeon Jeong, Hee Jung Lee, Yeoun Joong Jung, Ji-Hyoung Ha, Shin Young Park
    Food Control.2020; 109: 106954.     CrossRef
  • Molecular epidemiology of genogroup II norovirus infections in acute gastroenteritis patients during 2014–2016 in Pudong New Area, Shanghai, China
    Caoyi Xue, Lifeng Pan, Weiping Zhu, Yuanping Wang, Huiqin Fu, Chang Cui, Lan Lu, Sun Qiao, Biao Xu
    Gut Pathogens.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Review: Epidemiological evidence of groundwater contribution to global enteric disease, 1948–2015
    Heather M. Murphy, Morgan D. Prioleau, Mark A. Borchardt, Paul D. Hynds
    Hydrogeology Journal.2017; 25(4): 981.     CrossRef
  • Change in Concentrations of Human Norovirus and Male-Specific Coliphage under Various Temperatures, Salinities, and pH Levels in Seawater
    Poong Ho Kim, Yong Soo Park, Kunbawui Park, Ji Young Kwon, Hong Sik Yu, Hee Jung Lee, Ji Hoe Kim, Tae Seek Lee
    Korean Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences.2016; 49(4): 454.     CrossRef
  • Norovirus outbreaks occurred in different settings in the Republic of Korea
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2015; 6(5): 281.     CrossRef
Epidemics of Norovirus GII.4 Variant in Outbreak Cases in Korea, 2004–2012
Sunyoung Jung, Hyun Ju Jeong, Bo-Mi Hwang, Cheon-Kwon Yoo, Gyung Tae Chung, Hyesook Jeong, Yeon-Ho Kang, Deog-Yong Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2015;6(5):318-321.   Published online October 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2015.10.002
  • 2,004 View
  • 19 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Norovirus GII.4 is recognized as a worldwide cause of nonbacterial outbreaks. In particular, the GII.4 variant occurs every 2–3 years according to antigenic variation. The aim of our study was to identify GII.4 variants in outbreaks in Korea during 2004–2012. Partial VP1 sequence of norovirus GII.4-related outbreaks during 2004–2012 was analyzed. The partial VP1 sequence was detected with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, seminested polymerase chain reaction, and nucleotide sequence of 312-314 base pairs for phylogenetic comparison. Nine variants emerged in outbreaks, with the Sydney variant showing predominance recently. This predominance may persist for at least 3 years, although new variants may appear in Korea.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Genotypic and Epidemiological Trends of Acute Gastroenteritis Associated with Noroviruses in China from 2006 to 2016
    Shu-Wen Qin, Ta-Chien Chan, Jian Cai, Na Zhao, Zi-Ping Miao, Yi-Juan Chen, She-Lan Liu
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2017; 14(11): 1341.     CrossRef
Original Article
Availability of Clean Tap Water and Medical Services Prevents the Incidence of Typhoid Fever
Deog-Yong Lee, Esther Lee, HyeMin Park, SeongHan Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(2):68-71.   Published online April 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.03.005
  • 2,102 View
  • 19 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective: In this study, the factors that induced a decrease in the incidence of typhoid fever were analyzed. Based on the study results, we propose a quantitative and concrete solution to reduce the incidence of typhoid fever.
Methods
We analyzed the incidence and fatality rate of typhoid fever in Korea. Tap water service rate and the number of pharmacies, which affect the incidence rate of typhoid fever, were used as environmental factors.
Results
To prevent typhoid fever in the community, it is necessary to provide clean tap water service to 35.5% of the population, with an individual requiring 173 L of clean water daily. Appropriate access to clean water (51% service coverage, 307 L) helped the population to maintain individual hygiene and food safety practices, which brought about a decrease in the incidence of typhoid fever, and subsequently a decrease in fatality rate, which was achieved twice. During the 8-year study period, the fatality rate decreased to 1% when the population has access to proper medical service.
Conclusion
The fatality rate was primarily affected by the availability of medical services as well as by the incidence of typhoid fever. However, an analysis of the study results showed that the incidence of typhoid fever was affected only by the availability of clean water through the tap water system.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • TIPICO X: report of the 10th interactive infectious disease workshop on infectious diseases and vaccines
    Irene Rivero-Calle, Jose Gómez-Rial, Louis Bont, Bradford D. Gessner, Melvin Kohn, Ron Dagan, Daniel C. Payne, Laia Bruni, Andrew J. Pollard, Adolfo García-Sastre, Denise L. Faustman, Albert Osterhaus, Robb Butler, Francisco Giménez Sánchez, Francisco Álv
    Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics.2021; 17(3): 759.     CrossRef
  • Progress in the overall understanding of typhoid fever: implications for vaccine development
    Peter J O’Reilly, Dikshya Pant, Mila Shakya, Buddha Basnyat, Andrew J Pollard
    Expert Review of Vaccines.2020; 19(4): 367.     CrossRef

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives