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Brief Report
Imported Melioidosis in South Korea: A Case Series with a Literature Review
Seung Woo Kim, Geun-Yong Kwon, Bongyoung Kim, Donghyok Kwon, Jaeseung Shin, Geun-Ryang Bae
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2015;6(6):363-368.   Published online December 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2015.10.014
  • 1,889 View
  • 17 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Melioidosis is a potentially fatal infectious disease caused by the environmental anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus Burkholderia pseudomallei. Melioidosis is endemic to areas of northern Australia and Southeast Asia. With increasing international travel and migration, imported cases of melioidosis are being reported regularly. Here, we summarize the 11 cases of melioidosis reported in South Korea from 2003 to 2014.
Methods
Tracing epidemiological investigations were performed on every patient reported to the National Surveillance System since 2011. A systematic literature search was performed to identify melioidosis cases that occurred prior to 2011.
Results
The overall fatality rate was 36.4%. All the patients had visited Southeast Asia where melioidosis is endemic. The stay in the endemic region ranged from 4 days to 20 years. Of the seven patients who developed initial symptoms after returning to South Korea, the time interval between returning to South Korea and symptom onset ranged from 1 day to 3 years. The remaining four patients developed symptoms during their stay in the endemic region and were diagnosed with melioidosis in South Korea. Seven (63.6%) patients possessed at least one risk factor, all of whom were diabetic. Pneumonia was the most frequent clinical manifestation, but the patients showed a wide spectrum of clinical features, including internal organ abscesses, a mycotic aneurysm of the aorta, and coinfection with tuberculosis.
Conclusion
An early diagnosis and initiation of the appropriate antibiotics can reduce the mortality of melioidosis. Consequently, increased awareness of the risk factors and clinical features of melioidosis is required.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Cox model of predicting mortality among melioidosis patients in Northern Malaysia
    Kamaruddin Mardhiah, Nadiah Wan-Arfah, Nyi Nyi Naing, Muhammad Radzi Abu Hassan, Huan-Keat Chan
    Medicine.2021; 100(25): e26160.     CrossRef
  • Tuberculosis and Melioidosis at Distinct Sites Occurring Simultaneously
    Seow Yen Tan
    Case Reports in Infectious Diseases.2020; 2020: 1.     CrossRef
  • Burkholderia pseudomallei pathogenesis and survival in different niches
    Chee-Hoo Yip, Ahmad-Kamal Ghazali, Sheila Nathan
    Biochemical Society Transactions.2020; 48(2): 569.     CrossRef
  • Mycotic aneurysm secondary to melioidosis in China: A series of eight cases and a review of literature
    Hua Wu, Xuming Wang, Xiaojun Zhou, Zhicheng Wu, Yanyan Wang, Mengjie Pan, Binghuai Lu, Susanna Jane Dunachie
    PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.2020; 14(8): e0008525.     CrossRef
  • Fatal deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism secondary to melioidosis in China: case report and literature review
    Hua Wu, Dongliang Huang, Biao Wu, Mengjie Pan, Binghuai Lu
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Melioidosis in the Philippines
    Peter San Martin, Joseph Chua, Ralph Bautista, Jennifer Nailes, Mario Panaligan, David Dance
    Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease.2018; 3(3): 99.     CrossRef
  • Clinical and Imaging Findings of Musculoskeletal Melioidosis in the Right Hip: A Case Report
    Myung Hyun Kim, Tong Jin Chun
    Journal of the Korean Society of Radiology.2018; 78(3): 212.     CrossRef
  • Draft Genome Sequence of the First South Korean Clinical Isolate of Burkholderia pseudomallei, H0901
    Yong-Woo Shin, Myung-Min Choi, Jeong-Hoon Chun, Jae-Yon Yu, Dae-Won Kim, Gi-eun Rhie
    Genome Announcements.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Accidental Occupational Exposure to Burkholderia pseudomallei in South Korea Did Not Result in Melioidosis
    Jae-Bum Jun, Taehoon Lee, Joseph Jeong, Jeong-Hoon Chun, Yong-Woo Shin, Jiwon Jung
    Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology.2017; 38(7): 886.     CrossRef
  • Molecular detection of leptospirosis and melioidosis co-infection: A case report
    Mohammad R. Mohd Ali, Amira W. Mohamad Safiee, Padmaloseni Thangarajah, Mohd H. Fauzi, Alwi Muhd Besari, Nabilah Ismail, Chan Yean Yean
    Journal of Infection and Public Health.2017; 10(6): 894.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Results of Tuberculosis Contact Investigation in Congregate Settings in Korea, 2013
Yunhyung Kwon, So Jung Kim, Jieun Kim, Seol-yi Kim, Eun Mi Song, Eun Jung Lee, Yun Choi, Yejin Kim, Byoung ok Lim, Da Sul Kim, Duksun Choi, Hye Sung Kim, Ji Eun Park, Ji-eun Yun, Jin A. Park, Jong Rak Jung, Joo-kyoung Kim, Sang Hee Kang, Seo Yean Hong, Seung Jae Lee, Soo Jin Park, Sun Hwa Park, Sunhye Yoon, Yoonsun Kim, Yunjeong Choi, Yun Jeong Seo, Yul A Seo, Jiseon Park, Minhee Sung, Minjang Shin, Hyunjin Son, Yeonkyeng Lee, Unyeong Go, Geun-Yong Kwon
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(Suppl):S30-S36.   Published online December 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.10.010
  • 2,176 View
  • 17 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aimed to check the status of the contact investigation in congregate settings to eradicate tuberculosis (TB) in the Republic of Korea.
Methods
The “Integrated System for Disease and Public Health Management” is used for care and follow-up for patients and contacts of TB. We downloaded data for contact investigations conducted from January to December 2013.
Results
A total of 1,200 contact investigations in congregate settings were carried out by 25 field investigators in 2013. We performed the status of contact investigation, TB, and LTBI rate by age, accept rate of LTBI treatment, and complete rate of LTBI treatment during 2013. A total of 1,547 index TB patients, 149,166 contacts, and 259 additional TB patients were found through the investigation. Kindergartens showed the highest LTBI rate, 19.8%, among educational facilities. The second highest was in elementary schools and the subtotal LTBI rate of educational facilities was 7.8%. Social welfare/correctional facilities and workplaces showed relatively high LTBI rates of 23.8% and 23.6%, respectively. By age, individuals >35 years showed the highest LTBI rate, followed by those aged 0–4 years, 30–34 years, and 5–9 years, with rates of 18.1%, 16.4%, and 15.4% respectively. When comparing the tuberculin skin test (TST) positive conversion ratio by facility, middle school and high school were relatively high compared to the others. The accept rate of LTBI treatment in the workplace was lowest at 63% and the complete rate in elementary schools was lowest at 76.5%.
Conclusion
TB contact investigation is considered as a meaningful strategy for preventing TB outbreaks in congregate settings and decreasing the prevalence of TB in young people. Results of this study could be used to establish the LTBI management policy.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Latent Tuberculosis Cascade of Care Among Healthcare Workers: A Nationwide Cohort Analysis in Korea Between 2017 and 2018
    Jinsoo Min, Hyung Woo Kim, Joon Young Choi, Ah Young Shin, Ji Young Kang, Yunhee Lee, Jun-Pyo Myong, Hyunsuk Jeong, Sanghyuk Bae, Hyeon-Kyoung Koo, Sung-Soon Lee, Jae Seuk Park, Hyeon Woo Yim, Ju Sang Kim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Risk of active tuberculosis development in contacts exposed to infectious tuberculosis in congregate settings in Korea
    Shin Young Park, Sunmi Han, Young-Man Kim, Jieun Kim, Sodam Lee, Jiyeon Yang, Un-Na Kim, Mi-sun Park
    Scientific Reports.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The risk of active tuberculosis among individuals living in tuberculosis-affected households in the Republic of Korea, 2015
    Jiyeon Yang, Sodam Lee, Suhyeon Oh, Sunmi Han, Shin Young Park, Youngman Kim, Jieun Kim, Mi-sun Park, Philip C. Hill
    PLOS ONE.2019; 14(12): e0225744.     CrossRef
  • The Infectivity of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Korean Army Units: Evidence from Outbreak Investigations
    Chang-gyo Yoon, Dong Yoon Kang, Jaehun Jung, Soo Yon Oh, Jin Beom Lee, Mi-Hyun Kim, Younsuk Seo, Hee-Jin Kim
    Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases.2019; 82(4): 298.     CrossRef
  • Tuberculosis prevention and care in Korea: Evolution of policy and practice
    Unyeong Go, Misun Park, Un-Na Kim, Sodam Lee, Sunmi Han, Joosun Lee, Jiyeon Yang, Jieun Kim, Shinyoung Park, Youngman Kim, Hyosoon Yoo, Jeongok Cha, Wonseo Park, Haeyoung Kang, Hwon Kim, Guri Park, Minjung Kim, Ok Park, Hyunjin Son, Enhi Cho, Kyoungin Na,
    Journal of Clinical Tuberculosis and Other Mycobac.2018; 11: 28.     CrossRef
  • The Prevalence and Risk Factors of Latent Tuberculosis Infection among Health Care Workers Working in a Tertiary Hospital in South Korea
    Jae Seuk Park
    Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases.2018; 81(4): 274.     CrossRef
Emerging Pathogens and Vehicles of Food- and Water-borne Disease Outbreaks in Korea, 2007–2012
Shinje Moon, Il-Woong Sohn, Yeongseon Hong, Hyungmin Lee, Ji-Hyuk Park, Geun-Yong Kwon, Sangwon Lee, Seung-Ki Youn
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(1):34-39.   Published online February 28, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.12.004
  • 1,988 View
  • 17 Download
  • 15 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Food- and water-borne disease outbreaks (FBDOs) are an important public health problem worldwide. This study investigated the trends in FBDOs in Korea and established emerging causal pathogens and causal vehicles.
Methods
We analyzed FBDOs in Korea by year, location, causal pathogens, and causal vehicles from 2007 to 2012. Information was collected from the FBDOs database in the Korean Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Results
During 2007–2012, a total of 1794 FBDOs and 48,897 patients were reported. After 2007, FBDOs and patient numbers steadily decreased over the next 2 years and then plateaued until 2011. However, in 2012, FBDOs increased slightly accompanied by a large increase in the number of affected patients. Our results highlight the emergence of norovirus and pathogenic Escherichia coli other than enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) in schools in 2012. We found that pickled vegetables is an emerging causal vehicle responsible for this problem.
Conclusion
On the basis of this study we recommend intensified inspections of pickled vegetable manufacturers and the strengthening of laboratory surveillance of relevant pathogens.

Citations

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  • Phage biocontrol of zoonotic food-borne pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus for seafood safety
    Jung Hyen Lee, Minjin Oh, Byoung Sik Kim
    Food Control.2023; 144: 109334.     CrossRef
  • Antibiotic Resistance Profiles of Bacteria Isolated from Hotspot Environments in Bahir Dar City, Northwestern Ethiopia
    Kindu Geta, Mulugeta Kibret
    Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare.2022; Volume 15: 1403.     CrossRef
  • Inhibitory Effects of Crude Fucoidan Extract from Hizikia fusiformis against Norovirus Causing Foodborne Disease
    Hyojin Kim, Mi Sook Chung
    Korean Journal of Food and Cookery Science.2018; 34(5): 519.     CrossRef
  • High level of drug resistance by gram-negative bacteria from selected sewage polluted urban rivers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
    Teshome Belachew, Amete Mihret, Tesfaye Legesse, Yihenew Million, Kassu Desta
    BMC Research Notes.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Inhibitory Effects of Allium chinense and Its Dimethyl Disulfide against Murine Norovirus as a Surrogate for Foodborne Virus
    Mi Sook Chung
    Korean Journal of Food and Cookery Science.2018; 34(2): 222.     CrossRef
  • Inactivation of norovirus surrogates by kimchi fermentation in the presence of black raspberry
    Garam Bae, Jeongwon Kim, Hyojin Kim, Jong Hyeon Seok, Dan Bi Lee, Kyung Hyun Kim, Mi Sook Chung
    Food Control.2018; 91: 390.     CrossRef
  • Metagenomic Sequencing for Surveillance of Food- and Waterborne Viral Diseases
    David F. Nieuwenhuijse, Marion P. G. Koopmans
    Frontiers in Microbiology.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence, antimicrobial resistance and multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis profiles of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli isolated from different retail foods
    Lili Wang, Hiromi Nakamura, Eriko Kage-Nakadai, Yukiko Hara-Kudo, Yoshikazu Nishikawa
    International Journal of Food Microbiology.2017; 249: 44.     CrossRef
  • Complete genome sequence ofVibrio parahaemolyticusFORC_023 isolated from raw fish storage water
    Han Young Chung, Eun Jung Na, Kyu-Ho Lee, Sangryeol Ryu, Hyunjin Yoon, Ju-Hoon Lee, Hyeun Bum Kim, Heebal Kim, Sang Ho Choi, Bong-Soo Kim, David Rasko
    Pathogens and Disease.2016; 74(4): ftw032.     CrossRef
  • An outbreak of norovirus infection associated with fermented oyster consumption in South Korea, 2013
    H. G. CHO, S. G. LEE, M. Y. LEE, E. S. HUR, J. S. LEE, P. H. PARK, Y. B. PARK, M. H. YOON, S. Y. PAIK
    Epidemiology and Infection.2016; 144(13): 2759.     CrossRef
  • Molecular epidemiology of norovirus in South Korea
    Sung-Geun Lee, Han-Gil Cho, Soon-Young Paik
    BMB Reports .2015; 48(2): 61.     CrossRef
  • Three Gastroenteritis Outbreaks in South Korea Caused by the Consumption of Kimchi Tainted by Norovirus GI.4
    Ji-Hyuk Park, Sunyoung Jung, Jaeseung Shin, Jeong Su Lee, In Sun Joo, Deog-Yong Lee
    Foodborne Pathogens and Disease.2015; 12(3): 221.     CrossRef
  • Environmental monitoring of bacterial contamination and antibiotic resistance patterns of the fecal coliforms isolated from Cauvery River, a major drinking water source in Karnataka, India
    Sinosh Skariyachan, Arpitha Badarinath Mahajanakatti, Nisha Jayaprakash Grandhi, Akshatha Prasanna, Ballari Sen, Narasimha Sharma, Kiran S Vasist, Rajeswari Narayanappa
    Environmental Monitoring and Assessment.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Detection of viable murine norovirus using the plaque assay and propidium-monoazide-combined real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction
    Minhwa Lee, Dong Joo Seo, Jina Seo, Hyejin Oh, Su Been Jeon, Sang-Do Ha, Jinjong Myoung, In-Soo Choi, Changsun Choi
    Journal of Virological Methods.2015; 221: 57.     CrossRef
  • Emergence of Norovirus GII.4 variants in acute gastroenteritis outbreaks in South Korea between 2006 and 2013
    Han-Gil Cho, Po-Hyun Park, Sung-Geun Lee, Ju-Eun Kim, Kyung-A Kim, Hyeun-Kyong Lee, Eun-Mi Park, Myong-Ki Park, Sun-Young Jung, Deog-Yong Lee, Mi-hye Yoon, Jong-Bok Lee, Soon-Young Paik
    Journal of Clinical Virology.2015; 72: 11.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Epidemic Intelligence Service Officers and Field Epidemiology Training Program in Korea
Geun-Yong Kwon, Shinje Moon, Wooseok Kwak, Jin Gwack, Chaeshin Chu, Seung-Ki Youn
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(4):215-221.   Published online August 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.07.001
  • 2,134 View
  • 20 Download
  • 9 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Korea has adopted Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) officers through the Field Epidemiology Training Program (FETP) since 1999 for systematic control of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases. Graduates of medical schools in Korea are selected and serve as public health doctors (PHDs) for their mandatory military service. The duration of service is 3 years and PHDs comprise general practitioners and specialists. Some PHDs are selected as EIS officers with 3 weeks basic FETP training and work for central and provincial public health authorities to conduct epidemiological investigations. The total number of EIS officers is 31 as of 2012. The Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC) has 12 specialists, whereas specialists and each province has one or two EIS officers to administer local epidemiological investigations in 253 public health centers. The Korean EIS officers have successfully responded and prevented infectious diseases, but there is a unique limitation: the number of PHDs in Korea is decreasing and PHDs are not allowed to stay outside Korea, which makes it difficult to cope with overseas infectious diseases. Furthermore, after 3 years service, they quit and their experiences are not accumulated. KCDC has hired full-time EIS officers since 2012 to overcome this limitation.

Citations

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  • A resposta da Coreia do Sul à pandemia de COVID-19: lições aprendidas e recomendações a gestores
    Thais Regis Aranha Rossi, Catharina Leite Matos Soares, Gerluce Alves Silva, Jairnilson Silva Paim, Lígia Maria Vieira-da-Silva
    Cadernos de Saúde Pública.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Turnover Intention among Field Epidemiologists in South Korea
    Sukhyun Ryu
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2020; 17(3): 949.     CrossRef
  • National Response to COVID-19 in the Republic of Korea and Lessons Learned for Other Countries
    Juhwan Oh, Jong-Koo Lee, Dan Schwarz, Hannah L. Ratcliffe, Jeffrey F. Markuns, Lisa R. Hirschhorn
    Health Systems & Reform.2020; 6(1): e1753464.     CrossRef
  • Steering the Private Sector in COVID-19 Diagnostic Test Kit Development in South Korea
    Sora Lee
    Frontiers in Public Health.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Experience of 16 years and its associated challenges in the Field Epidemiology Training Program in Korea
    Moo-Sik Lee, Eun-Young Kim, Sang-Won Lee
    Epidemiology and Health.2017; 39: e2017058.     CrossRef
  • The direction of restructuring of a Korea field epidemiology training program through questionnaire survey among communicable disease response staff in Korea
    Moo Sik Lee, Kwan Lee, Jee-Hyuk Park, Jee-Young Hong, Min-Young Jang, Byoung-Hak Jeon, Sang-Yun Cho, Sun-Ja Choi, JeongIk Hong
    Epidemiology and Health.2017; 39: e2017032.     CrossRef
  • Review for the Korean Health Professionals and International Cooperation Doctors Dispatched to Peru by the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA)
    Bongyoung Kim
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2015; 6(2): 133.     CrossRef
  • From Seoul to Lima: Korean Doctors in Peru
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2015; 6(2): 71.     CrossRef
  • Emerging Pathogens and Vehicles of Food- and Water-borne Disease Outbreaks in Korea, 2007–2012
    Shinje Moon, Il-Woong Sohn, Yeongseon Hong, Hyungmin Lee, Ji-Hyuk Park, Geun-Yong Kwon, Sangwon Lee, Seung-Ki Youn
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2014; 5(1): 34.     CrossRef

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives