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Brief Report
Early Intervention Reduces the Spread of COVID-19 in Long-Term Care Facilities in the Republic of Korea
Shin Young Park, Gawon Choi, Hyeyoung Lee, Na-young Kim, Seon-young Lee, Kyungnam Kim, Soyoung Shin, Eunsu Jang, YoungSin Moon, KwangHwan Oh, JaeRin Choi, Sangeun Lee, Young-Man Kim, Jieun Kim, Seonju Yi, Jin Gwack, Ok Park, Young Joon Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(4):259-264.   Published online August 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.4.16
  • 4,819 View
  • 138 Download
  • 9 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

This study describes the epidemiological characteristics of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) based on reported cases from long-term care facilities. As of April 20th, 2020, 3 long-term care facilities in a metropolitan area of South Korea had reported cases of COVID-19. These facilities’ employees were presumed to be the sources of infection. There were 2 nursing hospitals that did not report any additional cases. One nursing home had a total of 25 cases, with an attack rate of 51.4% (95% CI 35.6–67.0), and a fatality rate of 38.9% (95% CI 20.3–61.4) among residents. The results from this study suggest that early detection and maintenance of infection control minimizes the risk of rapid transmission.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and corresponding control measures on long-term care facilities: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Jun Zhang, Yushan Yu, Mirko Petrovic, Xiaomei Pei, Qing-Bao Tian, Lei Zhang, Wei-Hong Zhang
    Age and Ageing.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A scoping review of the impacts of COVID-19 physical distancing measures on vulnerable population groups
    Lili Li, Araz Taeihagh, Si Ying Tan
    Nature Communications.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Staffing Levels and COVID-19 Infections and Deaths in Korean Nursing Homes
    Jiyeon Lee, Juh Hyun Shin, Kyeong Hun Lee, Charlene A. Harrington, Sun Ok Jung
    Policy, Politics, & Nursing Practice.2022; 23(1): 15.     CrossRef
  • An Experience of the Early Stage of COVID-19 Outbreak in Nursing Homes in Gyeonggi Province, Korea
    Gawon Choi, Na-young Kim, Seon-young Lee, Hae Deun Noh, Heeyoung Lee
    Korean Journal of Clinical Geriatrics.2022; 23(1): 27.     CrossRef
  • The implications of the COVID-19 pandemic for long term care facilities
    Muh-Yong Yen, Jonathan Schwartz, Po-Ren Hsueh
    Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases.2022; 35(4): 370.     CrossRef
  • Health impact of the first and second wave of COVID-19 and related restrictive measures among nursing home residents: a scoping review
    Marjolein E. A. Verbiest, Annerieke Stoop, Aukelien Scheffelaar, Meriam M. Janssen, Leonieke C. van Boekel, Katrien G. Luijkx
    BMC Health Services Research.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Epidemiology and clinical features of COVID-19 outbreaks in aged care facilities: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Mohammad Rashidul Hashan, Nicolas Smoll, Catherine King, Hannah Ockenden-Muldoon, Jacina Walker, Andre Wattiaux, Julieanne Graham, Robert Booy, Gulam Khandaker
    EClinicalMedicine.2021; 33: 100771.     CrossRef
  • Protecting Nursing Homes and Long-Term Care Facilities From COVID-19: A Rapid Review of International Evidence
    Sally Hall Dykgraaf, Sethunya Matenge, Jane Desborough, Elizabeth Sturgiss, Garang Dut, Leslee Roberts, Alison McMillan, Michael Kidd
    Journal of the American Medical Directors Associat.2021; 22(10): 1969.     CrossRef
  • Dementia Risk among Coronavirus Disease Survivors: A Nationwide Cohort Study in South Korea
    Hye-Yoon Park, In-Ae Song, Tak-Kyu Oh
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2021; 11(10): 1015.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Epidemiological Characteristics of Field Tick-Borne Pathogens in Gwang-ju Metropolitan Area, South Korea, from 2014 to 2018
Jung Wook Park, Seung Hun Lee, Gi Seong Lee, Jin Jong Seo, Jae Keun Chung
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(4):177-184.   Published online August 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.4.06
  • 4,449 View
  • 89 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The importance of tick-borne diseases is increasing because of climate change, with a lack of long-term studies on tick-borne pathogens in South Korea. To understand the epidemiological characteristics of tick-borne diseases, the monthly distribution of field ticks throughout the year was studied in South Korea between May 2014 and April 2018 in a cross sectional study.

Methods

The presence of various tick-borne pathogens (Rickettsia species, Borrelia species, Anaplasma phagocytophilum) was confirmed by using polymerase chain reaction, to provide information for a prevention strategy against tick-borne pathogenic infections, through increased understanding of the relationship between seasonal variation and risk of infection with Rickettsia species. This was performed using logistic regression analysis (SPSS 20, IBM, USA) of the data obtained from the study.

Results

During the study period there were 11,717 ticks collected and 4 species identified. Haemapysalis longicornis was the most common species (n = 10,904, 93.1%), followed by Haemapysalis flava (n = 656, 5.6%), Ixodes nipponensis (n = 151, 1.3%), and Amblyomma testudinarium (n = 6, 0.05%) The results of this cross-sectional study showed that Haemapysalis flava carried a higher risk of transmission of Rickettsia species than other tick species (p < 0.05).

Conclusion

In conclusion, due attention should be paid to preventing tick-borne infections in humans whilst engaged in outdoor activities in Spring and Autumn, particularly in places where there is a high prevalence of ticks.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Molecular Detection of Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia Species in Ticks Removed from Humans in the Republic of Korea
    Yu-Jung Kim, Ji Ye Seo, Seong Yoon Kim, Hee Il Lee
    Microorganisms.2022; 10(6): 1224.     CrossRef
  • Molecular Detection and Phylogeny of Tick-Borne Pathogens in Ticks Collected from Dogs in the Republic of Korea
    A-Tai Truong, Jinhyeong Noh, Yeojin Park, Hyun-Ji Seo, Keun-Ho Kim, Subin Min, Jiyeon Lim, Mi-Sun Yoo, Heung-Chul Kim, Terry A. Klein, Hyunkyoung Lee, Soon-Seek Yoon, Yun Sang Cho
    Pathogens.2021; 10(5): 613.     CrossRef
  • iSeq 100 for metagenomic pathogen screening in ticks
    Ju Yeong Kim, Myung-hee Yi, Alghurabi Areej Sabri Mahdi, Tai-Soon Yong
    Parasites & Vectors.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Molecular Identification of Borrelia spp. from Ticks in Pastures Nearby Livestock Farms in Korea
    Haeseung Lee, Seung-Hun Lee, SungShik Shin, Dongmi Kwak
    Insects.2021; 12(11): 1011.     CrossRef
Development and Utilization of a Rapid and Accurate Epidemic Investigation Support System for COVID-19
Young Joon Park, Sang Yun Cho, Jin Lee, Ikjin Lee, Won-Ho Park, Seungmyeong Jeong, Seongyun Kim, Seokjun Lee, Jaeho Kim, Ok Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(3):118-127.   Published online May 20, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.3.06
  • 9,905 View
  • 282 Download
  • 14 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

In this pandemic situation caused by a novel coronavirus disease in 2019 (COVID-19), an electronic support system that can rapidly and accurately perform epidemic investigations, is needed. It would systematically secure and analyze patients’ data (who have been confirmed to have the infection), location information, and credit card usage.

Methods

The “Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Act” in South Korea, established a legal basis for the securement, handling procedure, and disclosure of information required for epidemic investigations. The Epidemic Investigation Support System (EISS) was developed as an application platform on the Smart City data platform.

Results

The EISS performed the function of inter-institutional communication which reduced the processing period of patients’ data in comparison to other methods. This system automatically marked confirmed cases’ tracking data on a map and hot-spot analysis which lead to the prediction of areas where people may be vulnerable to infection.

Conclusion

The EISS was designed and implemented for use during an epidemic investigation to prevent the spread of an infectious disease, by specifically tracking confirmed cases of infection.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A scalable framework for smart COVID surveillance in the workplace using Deep Neural Networks and cloud computing
    Ajay Singh, Vaibhav Jindal, Rajinder Sandhu, Victor Chang
    Expert Systems.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 Cluster Linked to Aerosol Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 via Floor Drains
    Taewon Han, Heedo Park, Yungje Jeong, Jungmin Lee, Eungyeong Shon, Man-Seong Park, Minki Sung
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases.2022; 225(9): 1554.     CrossRef
  • Public health in times of crisis: An overlooked variable in city management theories?
    Celso Machado, Daielly Melina Nassif Mantovani Ribeiro, Adriana Backx Noronha Viana
    Sustainable Cities and Society.2021; 66: 102671.     CrossRef
  • Re-estimation of basic reproduction number of COVID-19 based on the epidemic curve by symptom onset date
    K. Hong, S. J. Yum, J. H. Kim, B. C. Chun
    Epidemiology and Infection.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Benefits of Mobile Contact Tracing on COVID-19: Tracing Capacity Perspectives
    Uichin Lee, Auk Kim
    Frontiers in Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Two-Way Contact Network Modeling for Identifying the Route of COVID-19 Community Transmission
    Sung Jin Lee, Sang Eun Lee, Ji-On Kim, Gi Bum Kim
    Informatics.2021; 8(2): 22.     CrossRef
  • State of the Art in Adoption of Contact Tracing Apps and Recommendations Regarding Privacy Protection and Public Health: Systematic Review
    Katarzyna Kolasa, Francesca Mazzi, Ewa Leszczuk-Czubkowska, Zsombor Zrubka, Márta Péntek
    JMIR mHealth and uHealth.2021; 9(6): e23250.     CrossRef
  • Riding the waves of the COVID-19 pandemic in South Korea
    Joseph Christian Obnial, Maria Beatriz Baron, Hannah Andrea Sagsagat, Erika Ong, Ma. Alexandra Nicola Valenzuela, Don Eliseo Lucero-Prisno III
    Journal of Primary Health Care.2021; 13(2): 116.     CrossRef
  • Contributions of Smart City Solutions and Technologies to Resilience against the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Literature Review
    Ayyoob Sharifi, Amir Reza Khavarian-Garmsir, Rama Krishna Reddy Kummitha
    Sustainability.2021; 13(14): 8018.     CrossRef
  • Harnessing the Power of Smart and Connected Health to Tackle COVID-19: IoT, AI, Robotics, and Blockchain for a Better World
    Farshad Firouzi, Bahar Farahani, Mahmoud Daneshmand, Kathy Grise, Jaeseung Song, Roberto Saracco, Lucy Lu Wang, Kyle Lo, Plamen Angelov, Eduardo Soares, Po-Shen Loh, Zeynab Talebpour, Reza Moradi, Mohsen Goodarzi, Haleh Ashraf, Mohammad Talebpour, Alireza
    IEEE Internet of Things Journal.2021; 8(16): 12826.     CrossRef
  • CASE-CF: Context Aware Smart Epidemic Control Framework
    Harsuminder Kaur Gill, Vivek Kumar Sehgal, Anil Kumar Verma
    New Generation Computing.2021; 39(3-4): 541.     CrossRef
  • Resolving the tension between full utilization of contact tracing app services and user stress as an effort to control the COVID-19 pandemic
    Jaehun Joo, Matthew Minsuk Shin
    Service Business.2020; 14(4): 461.     CrossRef
  • National Disaster Management System: COVID-19 Case in Korea
    Junic Kim, Kelly Ashihara
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2020; 17(18): 6691.     CrossRef
  • Evidence of Long-Distance Droplet Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 by Direct Air Flow in a Restaurant in Korea
    Keun-Sang Kwon, Jung-Im Park, Young Joon Park, Don-Myung Jung, Ki-Wahn Ryu, Ju-Hyung Lee
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Gender Differences in Harmful Use of Alcohol Among Korean Adults
Eunok Park, Yeon Sook Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(4):205-214.   Published online August 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.4.02
  • 3,782 View
  • 54 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Harmful alcohol consumption is associated with considerable social and economic damage to individuals and society. Because gender and ethnic background influence alcohol intake differently, examining gender specific factors influencing harmful drinking is necessary. This study investigated gender differences in alcohol consumption, harmful drinking, and the associated factors among Korean adults.

Methods

We analyzed the data from the 2012–2015 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Data from survey participants aged 20–64 years (N = 18,581) were included. The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test was used for alcohol dependence, and pooled weights were used. Chi-squared tests and multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted.

Results

The prevalence of harmful alcohol use (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test score ≥ 16) was 10.7% in the total sample; 18.4% in men and 3.4% in women, which constituted a significant difference. Education, marital status, smoking, perceived stress, and depressive feeling were associated with harmful drinking in both genders. However, household income, occupation, and perceived health status were associated with harmful drinking only in men.

Conclusion

Since there are gender differences in harmful drinking and alcohol dependence, gender tailored prevention and intervention strategies for alcohol dependence are necessary including consideration of smoking, stress, and depressive feeling.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Characteristics and Clinical Course of Diabetes of the Exocrine Pancreas: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study
    Nami Lee, So Jeong Park, Dongwoo Kang, Ja Young Jeon, Hae Jin Kim, Dae Jung Kim, Kwan-Woo Lee, Edward J. Boyko, Seung Jin Han
    Diabetes Care.2022; 45(5): 1141.     CrossRef
  • Harmful alcohol use among mothers of under-five child: findings from the Panel Study on Korean Children
    Seulgi Kim, Seung-Ah Choe, Sung-Il Cho
    BMC Women's Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Associations between Harmful Experiences from Alcohol Use of Others and Mental Health in Korean Adolescents
    Mi Ah Han
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2019; 16(21): 4240.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Review of the Incidence of Japanese Encephalitis in Foreign-Born and Korean Nationals Living in the Republic of Korea, 2007–2016
Een-Suk Shin, Ok Park, In-Sik Kong
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2018;9(3):126-129.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2018.9.3.08
  • 3,401 View
  • 99 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

The Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine was introduced to the national immunization program in 1985, which has led to a dramatic decrease in the number of reported cases, but JE continues to occur in foreign nationals residing in or traveling to Korea. Although the incidence is low, this study demonstrated that more Koreans were infected with JE than foreign-born expatriates. The incidence rates of Korean-born nationals were between 0.01 and 0.08 cases per 100,000. In contrast, the incidence rates of foreign-born nationals ranged between 0 and 0.26 cases per 100,000. The incidence rates clearly showed that foreign-born expatriates were more at risk, which underscores the importance of vaccination. We recommend heightened surveillance among JE-susceptible individuals and promote vaccination among foreign-born nationals living in Korea.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Japanese encephalitis in a U.S. traveler returning from Vietnam, 2022
    Zachary C. Janatpour, M. Andrew Boatwright, Sara M. Yousif, Maria-Fernanda Bonilla, Kelly A. Fitzpatrick, Susan L. Hills, Catherine F. Decker
    Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease.2023; 52: 102536.     CrossRef
  • Molecular Mechanism and Role of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infection in Central Nervous System-Mediated Diseases
    Pardeep Yadav, Pratik Chakraborty, Niraj Kumar Jha, Saikat Dewanjee, Abhimanyu Kumar Jha, Siva Prasad Panda, Prabhu Chandra Mishra, Abhijit Dey, Saurabh Kumar Jha
    Viruses.2022; 14(12): 2686.     CrossRef
  • Retention of neutralizing antibodies to Japanese encephalitis vaccine in age groups above fifteen years in Korea
    Hee-Jung Lee, Hanul Choi, Ki Hoon Park, Yuyeon Jang, Young-jin Hong, Young Bong Kim
    International Journal of Infectious Diseases.2020; 100: 53.     CrossRef
  • Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices
    Susan L. Hills, Emmanuel B. Walter, Robert L. Atmar, Marc Fischer, Emmanuel Walter, Robert L. Atmar, Elizabeth Barnett, Alan Barrett, Joseph A. Bocchini, Lin Chen, Eric Deussing, Doran Fink, Michael Holbrook, Myron Levin, Anthony Marfin, Cody Meissner, Ro
    MMWR. Recommendations and Reports.2019; 68(2): 1.     CrossRef
Original Article
Application of Gap-Constraints Given Sequential Frequent Pattern Mining for Protein Function Prediction
Hyeon Ah Park, Taewook Kim, Meijing Li, Ho Sun Shon, Jeong Seok Park, Keun Ho Ryu
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2015;6(2):112-120.   Published online April 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2015.01.006
  • 1,776 View
  • 15 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Predicting protein function from the protein–protein interaction network is challenging due to its complexity and huge scale of protein interaction process along with inconsistent pattern. Previously proposed methods such as neighbor counting, network analysis, and graph pattern mining has predicted functions by calculating the rules and probability of patterns inside network. Although these methods have shown good prediction, difficulty still exists in searching several functions that are exceptional from simple rules and patterns as a result of not considering the inconsistent aspect of the interaction network.
Methods
In this article, we propose a novel approach using the sequential pattern mining method with gap-constraints. To overcome the inconsistency problem, we suggest frequent functional patterns to include every possible functional sequence—including patterns for which search is limited by the structure of connection or level of neighborhood layer. We also constructed a tree-graph with the most crucial interaction information of the target protein, and generated candidate sets to assign by sequential pattern mining allowing gaps.
Results
The parameters of pattern length, maximum gaps, and minimum support were given to find the best setting for the most accurate prediction. The highest accuracy rate was 0.972, which showed better results than the simple neighbor counting approach and link-based approach.
Conclusion
The results comparison with other approaches has confirmed that the proposed approach could reach more function candidates that previous methods could not obtain.
Brief Report
A Strategic Plan for the Second Phase (2013–2015) of the Korea Biobank Project
Ok Park, Sang Yun Cho, So Youn Shin, Jae-Sun Park, Jun Woo Kim, Bok-Ghee Han
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(2):107-116.   Published online April 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.03.006
  • 2,121 View
  • 23 Download
  • 9 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
The Korea Biobank Project (KBP) was led by the Ministry of Health and Welfare to establish a network between the National Biobank of Korea and biobanks run by university-affiliated general hospitals (regional biobanks). The Ministry of Health and Welfare started the project to enhance medical and health technology by collecting, managing, and providing researchers with high-quality human bioresources. The National Biobank of Korea, under the leadership of the Ministry of Health and Welfare, collects specimens through various cohorts and regional biobanks within university hospitals gather specimens from patients. The project began in 2008, and the first phase ended in 2012, which meant that there needed to be a plan for the second phase that begins in 2013. Consequently, professionals from within and outside the project were gathered to develop a plan for the second phase. Under the leadership of the planning committee, six working groups were formed to formulate a practical plan. By conducting two workshops with experts in the six working groups and the planning committee and three forums in 2011 and 2012, they have developed a strategic plan for the second phase of the KBP. This document presents a brief report of the second phase of the project based on a discussion with them.During the first phase of the project (2008–2012), a network was set up between the National Biobank of Korea and 17 biobanks at university-affiliated hospitals in an effort to unify informatics and governance among the participating biobanks. The biobanks within the network manage data on their biospecimens with a unified Biobank Information Management System. Continuous efforts are being made to develop a common standard operating procedure for resource collection, management, distribution, and personal information security, and currently, management of these data is carried out in a somewhat unified manner. In addition, the KBP has trained and educated professionals to work within the biobanks, and has also carried out various publicity promotions to the public and researchers. During the first phase, biospecimens from more than 300,000 participants through various cohorts and biospecimens from more than 200,000 patients from hospitals were collected, which were distributed to approximately 600 research projects.The planning committee for the second phase evaluated that the first phase of the KBP was successful. However, the first phase of the project was meant to allow autonomy to the individual biobanks. The biobanks were able to choose the kind of specimens they were going to collect and the amount of specimen they would set as a goal, as well as being allowed to choose their own methods to manage their biobanks (autonomy). Therefore, some biobanks collected resources that were easy to collect and the resources needed by researchers were not strategically collected. In addition, there was also a low distribution rate to researchers outside of hospitals, who do not have as much access to specimens and cases as those in hospitals. There were also many cases in which researchers were not aware of the KBP, and the distribution processes were not set up to be convenient to the demands of researchers.Accordingly, the second phase of the KBP will be focused on increasing the integration and cooperation between the biobanks within the network. The KBP plans to set goals for the strategic collection of the needed human bioresources. Although the main principle of the first phase was to establish infrastructure and resource collection, the key objective of the second phase is the efficient utilization of gathered resources. In order to fully utilize the gathered resources in an efficient way, distribution systems and policies must be improved. Vitalization of distribution, securing of high-value resource and related clinical and laboratory information, international standardization of resource management systems, and establishment of a virtuous cycle between research and development (R&D) and biobanks are the four main strategies. Based on these strategies, 12 related objectives have been set and are planned to be executed.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
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    Hajar Yaghoobi, Sayedeh Azimeh Hosseini
    Journal of Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Neil Khosla, Rodolfo Valdez
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    Anthony Larsson
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    Hyun Sang Park, Hune Cho, Hwa Sun Kim
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    Won Bok Lee
    Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics.2016; 44(2): 342.     CrossRef
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Articleses
National Biobank of Korea: Quality control Programs of Collected-human Biospecimens
Jae-Eun Lee, Ji-Hyun Kim, Eun-Jung Hong, Hye Sook Yoo, Hye-Young Nam, Ok Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2012;3(3):185-189.   Published online June 30, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2012.07.007
  • 2,001 View
  • 15 Download
  • 16 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Personalized medicine is emerging as a main paradigm for risk prediction, pre-diagnosis, and effective prevention and treatment of disease. A large number of human biospecimens and their clinical data are essential resources for the success of personalized medicine as well as other biomedical research. The National Biobank of Korea (NBK) has collected well-annotated and high quality human biospecimens, and distributes them to the Korean biomedical scientists, through the Korea Biobank Project (KBP). The ultimate goal of NBK activities is to promote biomedical research and public health. As of December- 2011, the NBK has collected various human biospecimens from 525,416 participants including 325,952 Korean populations and 199,464 patients. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the KBP and quality control programs for collection of human biospecimens with high quality of NBK.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Multi-omics reveals microbiome, host gene expression, and immune landscape in gastric carcinogenesis
    Chan Hyuk Park, Changjin Hong, A-reum Lee, Jaeyun Sung, Tae Hyun Hwang
    iScience.2022; 25(3): 103956.     CrossRef
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    Haewon Byeon
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Opening of the National Biobank of Korea as the Infrastructure of Future Biomedical Science in Korea
Sang Yun Cho, Eun Jung Hong, Jung Min Nam, Bogkee Han, Chaeshin Chu, Ok Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2012;3(3):177-184.   Published online June 30, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2012.07.004
  • 2,289 View
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  • 31 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
On April 26, 2012, the Korea National Institute of Health officially held the opening ceremony of newly dedicated biobank building, ‘NationalBiobank of Korea’. The stocked biospecimens and related information have been distributed for medical and public health researches. The Korea Biobank Project, which was initiated in 2008, constructed the Korea Biobank Network consisting of the National Biobank of Korea (NBK) with 17 regional biobanks in Korea. As of December 2011, a total of 525,416 biospecimens with related information have been secured: 325,952 biospecimens from the general population obtained through cohort studies and 199,464 biospecimens of patients from regional biobanks. A large scale genomic study, Korea Association Resource (KARE) and many researches utilized the biospecimens secured through Korea Genome Epidemiology Study (KoGES) and Korea Biobank Project (KBP). Construction of ‘National Biobank of Korea’, a dedicated biobank building at Osong means that NBK can manage and check quality of the biospecimens with promising distribution of 26 million vials of biospecimen, which provide the infrastructure for the development of health technology in Korea. The NBK and the National Library of Medicine (to be constructed in 2014) will play a central role in future biomedical research in Korea.

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Changes in Human Immunodeficiency Virusrelated Knowledge and Stigmatizing Attitudes among Korean Adolescents from 2006 to 2011
Aeree Sohn, SungBok Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2012;3(2):107-112.   Published online June 30, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2012.04.006
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study assessed the prevalence and changes of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) knowledge and stigmatizing attitudes in 2006, 2008, and 2011.
Methods
Three cross-sectional surveys were conducted in 2006, 2008, and 2011. A cross-sectional sample of high school students in Seoul, South Korea was targeted. A self-administered questionnaire measuring general and transmission and discriminatory attitudes was used.
Results
Misconceptions about casual contact were widespread, even though the proportion responding incorrectly decreased significantly over the 5-year period. The respondents in all surveys displayed a high level of discrimination against those with HIV/AIDS in some situations, particularly in the idea of HIV/AIDS making the respondent feel disgusted (63.3% in 2006, 57.5% in 2008, and 52.6% in 2011), avoiding sitting with people with HIV/AIDS (50.6% in 2006, 50.5% in 2008, and 48.5% in 2011), and blaming those with HIV for becoming infected (46.6% in 2006, 42.8% in 2008, and 43.0% in 2011). Even though respondents had a high level of stigmatizing attitudes, the survey showed that the stigma has declined over the 5-year period.
Conclusion
The survey results showed that public health policy should recognize that HIV stigmatizing attitudes persist in Korea. This finding has implications for the development of intervention programs focusing on reducing the levels of discrimination.

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    Ian J. Cooke, Rohan D. Jeremiah, Nataka J. Moore, Karriem Watson, Michael A. Dixon, Gregory L. Jordan, Marcus Murray, Mary K. Keeter, Courtney M. P. Hollowell, Adam B. Murphy
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    S. Pilar Suguimoto, Teeranee Techasrivichien, Patou Masika Musumari, Christina El-saaidi, Bhekumusa Wellington Lukhele, Masako Ono-Kihara, Masahiro Kihara
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    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
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HIV/AIDS Knowledge, Stigmatizing Attitudes, and Related Behaviors and Factors that Affect Stigmatizing Attitudes against HIV/AIDS among Korean Adolescents
Aeree Sohn, SungBok Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2012;3(1):24-30.   Published online December 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2012.01.004
  • 2,144 View
  • 14 Download
  • 28 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study examined the sex differentials for specific aspects of knowledge regarding HIV, stigmatizing attitudes toward people with HIV/AIDS (PWHAs) and sexual behavior. In addition, the factors that affect stigmatizing attitudes toward PWHAs were investigated.
Methods
The population of this study comprised of senior high students in Seoul, Korea. Eight high schools were selected randomly and 1566 adolescents participated in the survey. A total sample of 1548 cases (18 cases were excluded) was used for analysis. A self-administered questionnaire measuring their general and transmission and discriminatory attitudes was used.
Results
The level of HIV/AIDS knowledge among Korean adolescents was low, as indicated by a correct response rate of 54% (7.0 out of 13). The students answered correctly about HIV transmission by kissing at 50.2%, toilets at 59.4%, cup sharing at 57.4%, and daily school life at 60.5%. The level of discriminatory attitudes towards HIV-infected persons was high. Boys reported a higher proportion of sexual experience (7.0% vs. 2.6%, OR=2.89, p < 0.001). Only 39.0% used a condom during their last sexual encounter and more girls (53.3%) than boys (35.3%) reported using a condom.
Conclusions
These findings highlight the need for increasing HIV knowledge, reducing HIV stigma, and providing sex education focusing on safer sex practices.

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    Aeree Sohn, Byonghee Cho, Harvey A. Kennedy
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  • Discrimination and Stigma
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2015; 6(3): 141.     CrossRef
  • Changing Patterns of HIV Epidemic in 30 Years in East Asia
    S. Pilar Suguimoto, Teeranee Techasrivichien, Patou Masika Musumari, Christina El-saaidi, Bhekumusa Wellington Lukhele, Masako Ono-Kihara, Masahiro Kihara
    Current HIV/AIDS Reports.2014; 11(2): 134.     CrossRef
  • What is Next for HIV/AIDS in Korea?
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2013; 4(6): 291.     CrossRef
  • Changes in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-related Knowledge and Stigmatizing Attitudes among Korean Adolescents from 2006 to 2011
    Aeree Sohn, SungBok Park
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2012; 3(2): 107.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge, Attitudes, and Sexual Behaviors in HIV/AIDS and Predictors Affecting Condom Use among Men Who Have Sex with Men in South Korea
    Aeree Sohn, Byonghee Cho
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2012; 3(3): 156.     CrossRef
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    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2012; 3(2): 65.     CrossRef
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    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
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Alterations of gyrA, gyrB, and parC and Activity of Efflux Pump in Fluoroquinolone-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii
Sunok Park, Kyeong Min Lee, Yong Sun Yoo, Jung Sik Yoo, Jae Il Yoo, Hwa Su Kim, Yeong Seon Lee, Gyung Tae Chung
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(3):164-170.   Published online December 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.11.040
  • 1,986 View
  • 15 Download
  • 29 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study investigated the fluoroquinolone-resistant mechanism of 56 clinical cases of A baumannii infection from 23 non-tertiary hospitals, collected between 2004 and 2006.
Methods
Susceptibility testing was performed by broth microdilution and Epsilometer test. Analyses of quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) were done by sequencing. The activity of the efflux pump was measured using inhibitors.
Results
The sequences from selected 56 isolates were divided into seven groups (I-VII) on the basis of mutations in gyrA (S83L), parC (S80L, S80W and S84K) and gyrB (containing the novel mutations E679D, D644Y and A677V). The 27 isolates with triple mutations in gyrA, gyrB and parC (groups IV-VII) showed higher levels of resistance to ciprofloxacin (minimal inhibitory concentration [MIC] of 16-256 μg/mL) than the 26 isolates with double mutations in gyrA and parC (groups II and III, MIC of 8-64 μ g/mL; p < 0.05). Alterations in the efflux pump were observed in four isolates with the parC S80L mutation (group II) or E84K mutation (group VII), but no effect was observed in an isolate with the parC S80 W mutation (group III).
Conclusion
These results suggest that triple mutations in clinical isolates of A baumannii contribute to the development of high levels of resistance to fluoroquinolones and that mutations in parC S80L or E84K (groups II and VII) may contribute to alterations in efflux pump activity in A baumannii.

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PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives