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Original Article
Depression among Korean Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Ansan-Community-Based Epidemiological Study
Chan Young Park, So Young Kim, Jong Won Gil, Min Hee Park, Jong-Hyock Park, Yeonjung Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2015;6(4):224-232.   Published online August 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2015.05.004
  • 1,914 View
  • 12 Download
  • 22 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
There are an increasing number of studies being carried out on depression in patients with diabetes. Individuals with diabetes have been reported as having a higher prevalence of depression compared to those without diabetes. However, only a few studies involving Korean patients have been conducted. The aims of this study were to examine the prevalence of depression and to find various risk factors according to the degree of depression among Korean patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).
Methods
An Ansan-community-based epidemiological study was conducted from 2005 to 2012. The total number of participants in this study was 3,540, from which patients with diabetes (n = 753) have been selected. The presence of depression was evaluated using the Beck Depression Inventory total score.
Results
The prevalence of depression was 28.8%. The mean age of participants was 55.5 ± 8.2 years. We divided the participants into three groups (without-depression, moderate-depression, and severe-depression groups) to examine the depression prevalence among Korean T2DM patients. The unemployed participants had 2.40 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21–4.76], the low-income participants had 2.57 (95% CI 1.52–4.35), the participants using an oral diabetes medicine or insulin had 2.03 (95% CI 1.25–3.32), the participants who are currently smoking had 2.03 (95% CI 1.10–3.73), and those without regular exercise had 1.91 (95% CI 1.17–3.14) times higher odds of depression in the severe-depression group, compared with the without-depression group.
Conclusion
There was a significant association between depression prevalence and diabetes, and we found various risk factors according to the degree of depression in Korean patients with T2DM.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Psychological Health and Diabetes Self-Management among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes during COVID-19 in the Southwest of Saudi Arabia
    Abdulrhman H. Alkhormi, Mohamed Salih Mahfouz, Najim Z. Alshahrani, Abdulrahman Hummadi, Wali A. Hakami, Doha H. Alattas, Hassan Q. Alhafaf, Leena E. Kardly, Mulook A. Mashhoor
    Medicina.2022; 58(5): 675.     CrossRef
  • Higher risk of depression in individuals with type 2 diabetes and obesity: Results of a meta-analysis
    Thelma Beatriz González-Castro, Yudy Merady Escobar-Chan, Ana Fresan, María Lilia López-Narváez, Carlos Alfonso Tovilla-Zárate, Isela Esther Juárez-Rojop, Jorge L Ble-Castillo, Alma Delia Genis-Mendoza, Pedro Iván Arias-Vázquez
    Journal of Health Psychology.2021; 26(9): 1404.     CrossRef
  • The Effects of Meditation with a Biofeedback Program on Stress and Depression Levels among People with Mild Depression Diabetes
    Ormanee Patarathipakorn, Manyat Ruchiwit, Marlaine Smith
    The Open Public Health Journal.2021; 14(1): 104.     CrossRef
  • Association between the level of adherence to dietary guidelines and depression among Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus
    Seonghee Park, Kyong Park
    Journal of Psychosomatic Research.2021; 145: 110463.     CrossRef
  • Depression Among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Prevalence and Associated Factors in Hue City, Vietnam
    Nhu Minh Hang Tran, Quang Ngoc Linh Nguyen, Thi Han Vo, Tran Tuan Anh Le, Ngoc Ha Ngo
    Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets .2021; Volume 14: 505.     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated with Depressive Symptoms in Korean Adults with Diabetes Mellitus: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Mihyun Jeong
    Healthcare.2021; 9(8): 1049.     CrossRef
  • Spiritual intelligence, mindfulness, emotional dysregulation, depression relationship with mental well-being among persons with diabetes during COVID-19 pandemic
    Wojujutari Kenni Ajele, Teslim Alabi Oladejo, Abimbola A. Akanni, Oyeyemi Bukola Babalola
    Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders.2021; 20(2): 1705.     CrossRef
  • Depression and Its Predictors among Diabetes Mellitus Patients Attending Treatment in Hawassa University Comprehensive Specialized Hospital, Southern Ethiopia
    Bereket Beyene Gebre, Suzan Anand, Zebene Mekonnen Assefa
    Journal of Diabetes Research.2020; 2020: 1.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Study Design and Survey Instrument to Identify the Association Between Depressive Symptoms and Physical Activity in Type 2 Diabetes, 2000-2018: A Systematic Review
    Jusung Lee, Timothy Callaghan, Marcia Ory, Hongwei Zhao, Margaret Foster, Jane N. Bolin
    The Diabetes Educator.2020; 46(1): 28.     CrossRef
  • Genetic Overlap Between Type 2 Diabetes and Depression in a Sri Lankan Population Twin Sample
    Carol Kan, Kaushalya Jayaweera, Anushka Adikari, Sisira Siribaddana, Helena M.S. Zavos, Lisa Harber-Aschan, Athula Sumathipala, Matthew Hotopf, Khalida Ismail, Frühling Rijsdijk
    Psychosomatic Medicine.2020; 82(2): 247.     CrossRef
  • Depression in Iranian Children with Diabetes and Related Factors
    Azadeh Sayarifard, Fatemeh Sayarifard, Maryam Nazari, Morteza Nikzadian, Mona Amrollahinia, Javad Mahmoudi-Gharaei
    Iranian Journal of Pediatrics.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Undiagnosed Depression in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes
    Dina Siddiq Abdulhadi Alajmani, Amna Mohamad Alkaabi, Mariam Waleed Alhosani, Ayesha Abdulaziz Folad, Fawzia Ahmed Abdouli, Frederick Robert Carrick, Mahera Abdulrahman
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Risk and protective factors of co-morbid depression in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a meta analysis
    Aidibai Simayi, Patamu Mohemaiti
    Endocrine Journal.2019; 66(9): 793.     CrossRef
  • The prevalence of comorbid depression in patients with type 2 diabetes: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis on huge number of observational studies
    Mohammad Khaledi, Fahimeh Haghighatdoost, Awat Feizi, Ashraf Aminorroaya
    Acta Diabetologica.2019; 56(6): 631.     CrossRef
  • Effect of walking and aerobic exercise on physical performance and depression in cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus
    Manal K. Youssef
    The Egyptian Journal of Internal Medicine.2019; 31(2): 142.     CrossRef
  • Premorbid risk perception, lifestyle, adherence and coping strategies of people with diabetes mellitus: A phenomenological study in the Brong Ahafo Region of Ghana
    Philip Teg-Nefaah Tabong, Vitalis Bawontuo, Doris Ningwiebe Dumah, Joseph Maaminu Kyilleh, Tolgou Yempabe, Noël C. Barengo
    PLOS ONE.2018; 13(6): e0198915.     CrossRef
  • Past and Current Status of Adult Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Management in Korea: A National Health Insurance Service Database Analysis
    Seung-Hyun Ko, Kyungdo Han, Yong-ho Lee, Junghyun Noh, Cheol-Young Park, Dae-Jung Kim, Chang Hee Jung, Ki-Up Lee, Kyung-Soo Ko
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2018; 42(2): 93.     CrossRef
  • Why Early Psychological Attention for Type 2 Diabetics Could Contribute to Metabolic Control
    Alfredo Briones-Aranda, Manuela Castellanos-Pérez, Raquel Gómez-Pliego
    Romanian Journal of Diabetes Nutrition and Metabol.2018; 25(3): 329.     CrossRef
  • Depression and Mortality in People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, 2003 to 2013: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study
    Jong-Hyun Jeong, Yoo Hyun Um, Seung-Hyun Ko, Jong-Heon Park, Joong-Yeol Park, Kyungdo Han, Kyung-Soo Ko
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2017; 41(4): 296.     CrossRef
  • Diabetes-related distress and its associated factors among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in China
    Huanhuan Zhou, Junya Zhu, Lin Liu, Fan Li, Anne F. Fish, Tao Chen, Qingqing Lou
    Psychiatry Research.2017; 252: 45.     CrossRef
  • Comorbidity of depression and diabetes: an application of biopsychosocial model
    Tesfa Dejenie Habtewold, Md. Atiqul Islam, Yosef Tsige Radie, Balewgizie Sileshi Tegegne
    International Journal of Mental Health Systems.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Differences in depression between unknown diabetes and known diabetes: results from China health and retirement longitudinal study
    Huaqing Liu, Xiaoyue Xu, John J. Hall, Xuesen Wu, Min Zhang
    International Psychogeriatrics.2016; 28(7): 1191.     CrossRef
Articles
Dietary Patterns and Osteoporosis Risk in Postmenopausal Korean Women
Seon-Joo Park, Seong-Eun Joo, Haesook Min, Jae Kyung Park, Yeonjung Kim, Sung Soo Kim, Younjhin Ahn
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2012;3(4):199-205.   Published online December 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2012.10.005
  • 1,903 View
  • 16 Download
  • 23 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The prevalence of osteoporosis and related fractures has increased rapidly in Korean women. Proper nutrition intake is associated with the prevention of osteoporosis. We analyzed the association between dietary patterns and the risk of osteoporosis during a 4-year follow-up in postmenopausal Korean women.
Methods
Postmenopausal women (n = 1,725) who participated in the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study were enrolled. Food intake was assessed using a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire, and a quantitative ultrasound device was used to measure the speed of sound at the radius and tibia.
Results
Three major dietary patterns were identified using factor analysis based on baseline intake data: traditional (high intake of rice, kimchi, and vegetables), dairy (high intake of milk, dairy products, and green tea), and western (high intake of sugar, fat, and bread). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risk for osteoporosis. An inverse association was detected between the dairy dietary pattern and the osteoporosis incidence [relative risk (RR): 0.63, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.42–0.93, p-trend=0.055 in radius; RR: 0.56, 95% CI: 0.35–0.90, p-trend=0.048 in tibia]. Individuals in the highest quintile for the traditional dietary pattern (p-trend = 0.009 in tibia) and western dietary pattern (p-trend = 0.043 in radius) demonstrated a higher risk of osteoporosis incidence than those in the lowest quintile.
Conclusion
These results suggested that high consumption of milk, dairy products, and green tea may reduce the risk of osteoporosis in postmenopausal Korean women.

Citations

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  • Association between macronutrients intake distribution and bone mineral density
    Shihua Gao, Xin Qian, Sicong Huang, Wanxi Deng, Zhe Li, Yingyu Hu
    Clinical Nutrition.2022; 41(8): 1689.     CrossRef
  • Drinking tea before menopause is associated with higher bone mineral density in postmenopausal women
    Saili Ni, Lu Wang, Guowei Wang, Jie Lin, Yiyun Ma, Xueyin Zhao, Yuan Ru, Weifang Zheng, Xiaohui Zhang, Shankuan Zhu
    European Journal of Clinical Nutrition.2021; 75(10): 1454.     CrossRef
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    Bin Sheng, Xin Li, Andreas K. Nussler, Sheng Zhu
    Medicine.2021; 100(8): e24684.     CrossRef
  • Postmenopausal women with osteoporosis consume high amounts of vegetables but insufficient dairy products and calcium to benefit from their virtues: the CoLaus/OsteoLaus cohort
    A. Lanyan, P. Marques-Vidal, E. Gonzalez-Rodriguez, D. Hans, O. Lamy
    Osteoporosis International.2020; 31(5): 875.     CrossRef
  • Combining Population-Specific Dietary Patterns in Meta-analyses: True or False?
    Asma Salari-Moghaddam, Bagher Larijani, Ahmad Esmaillzadeh
    Advances in Nutrition.2020; 11(2): 463.     CrossRef
  • Effect of nutrient intake and dietary diversity score on osteoporosis of middle-aged adults and elderly based on 2015–2017 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data
    Sehyug Kwon, Jung Sug Lee
    Journal of Nutrition and Health.2020; 53(2): 155.     CrossRef
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    Roberto Fabiani, Giulia Naldini, Manuela Chiavarini
    Advances in Nutrition.2020; 11(3): 743.     CrossRef
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    Divya Upadhyay, Taruneet Kaur, Rajeev Kapila, Suman Kapila
    Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.2020; 68(31): 8308.     CrossRef
  • Nutrient and Dietary Patterns in Relation to the Pathogenesis of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis—A Literature Review
    Bolaji Lilian Ilesanmi-Oyelere, Marlena C. Kruger
    Life.2020; 10(10): 220.     CrossRef
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    Simon Rønnow Schacht, Mads Vendelbo Lind, Kenneth Hudlebusch Mertz, Jacob Bülow, Rasmus Bechshøft, Grith Højfeldt, Aide Schucany, Morten Hjulmand, Chiara Sidoli, Søren Binder Andersen, Mikkel Jensen, Søren Reitelseder, Lars Holm, Inge Tetens
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Original Article
Plasma Calcium and Risk of Hypertension: Propensity Score Analysis Using Data From the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study
Jong Wook Kim, Kwang-Pil Ko, Hee Jo Koo, Younjhin Ahn, Seon-Joo Park, Hyo-Mi Kim, Yeonjung Kim, Sung Soo Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(2):83-88.   Published online June 30, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.07.004
  • 1,892 View
  • 12 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objective To investigate associations between plasma calcium and future incidence of hypertension in a healthy population.
Methods
We used prospective data from Ansung and Ansan cohorts (n = 10,038) of the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study. Data from baseline (2001–02) to the fourth study (2007–08) were used. After excluding hypertensive cases at baseline, missing data, and outliers, 5560 participants were analyzed. Propensity scores for having higher plasma calcium (≥2.37 mmol/L) were created for each participant. After propensity score matching (1:1 nearest neighbor matching within caliper), 2153 pairs were left for analysis. Factors that were significantly different between the lower and higher plasma calcium groups before matching either became nonsignificant or the difference decreased in size.
Results
Using multivariable Cox proportional hazard models with robust standard errors accounting for clustering of matched pairs, higher plasma calcium was associated with higher incidence of hypertension (adjusted HR, 1.24; robust 95%CI, 1.07–1.43). Among those with higher plasma calcium, low dietary calcium intake increased the development of hypertension, but the effect was not significant. Sensitivity analysis showed that our results were robust to hidden bias.
Conclusions
Plasma calcium was positively associated with incidence of hypertension. These results expand on cross-sectional associations between hypercalcemia and the metabolic syndrome, and extend the link to future risk of hypertension.

Citations

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  • Hypocalcemia is associated with severe COVID-19: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Januar Wibawa Martha, Arief Wibowo, Raymond Pranata
    Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research &.2021; 15(1): 337.     CrossRef
  • Plasma total calcium concentration is associated with blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance in normotensive and never-treated hypertensive subjects
    Lasse Oinonen, Jenni Koskela, Arttu Eräranta, Antti Tikkakoski, Mika Kähönen, Onni Niemelä, Jukka Mustonen, Ilkka Pörsti
    Blood Pressure.2020; 29(3): 137.     CrossRef
  • Hipercalcemia como causa de hipertensión arterial presentación de un caso
    Carlos Harrison Gómez, Derek Harrison Ragle, Francisco Sánchez Lezama, Adalberto Arceo Navarro, Víctor Manuel Arredondo Arzola, Luis Gerardo Domínguez Carrillo
    Atención Familiar.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives