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Review Article
Effects of medication adherence interventions for older adults with chronic illnesses: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Hae Ok Jeon, Myung-Ock Chae, Ahrin Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(5):328-340.   Published online October 12, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0168
  • 811 View
  • 45 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to understand the characteristics of medication adherence interventions for older adults with chronic illnesses, and to investigate the average effect size by combining the individual effects of these interventions. Data from studies meeting the inclusion criteria were systematically collected in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines. The results showed that the average effect size (Hedges’ g) of the finally selected medication adherence interventions for older adults with chronic illnesses calculated using a random-effects model was 0.500 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.342−0.659). Of the medication adherence interventions, an implementation intention intervention (using face-to-face meetings and telephone monitoring with personalized behavioral strategies) and a health belief model–based educational program were found to be highly effective. Face-to-face counseling was a significantly effective method of implementing medication adherence interventions for older adults with chronic illnesses (Hedges’ g=0.531, 95% CI, 0.186−0.877), while medication adherence interventions through education and telehealth counseling were not effective. This study verified the effectiveness of personalized behavioral change strategies and cognitive behavioral therapy based on the health belief model, as well as face-to-face meetings, as medication adherence interventions for older adults with chronic illnesses.
Original Articles
Factors Influencing Self-Rated Oral Health in Elderly People Residing in the Community: Results from the Korea Community Health Survey, 2016
Jong-Hoon Moon, Sung-Jin Heo, Jin-Hwa Jung
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(4):245-250.   Published online August 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.4.14
  • 4,158 View
  • 74 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The aim of this study was to examine the factors influencing perceived oral health in elderly individuals residing in the community.

Methods

This study used raw data from the Korea community health survey, 2016. Of the 64,223 participants that were elderly (aged ≥ 65 years), 61,280 (95.4%) were included for analysis. Self-rated oral health was the dependent variable and 6 independent variables including age, gender, type of area of residence (metropolitan or provincial), educational level, income, and living status with spouse were assessed. Oral function was studied based on mastication, pronunciation, and use of dentures, and oral health behavior included brushing teeth after breakfast, after lunch, after dinner, and before sleep). The EQ-5D questionnaire measured health-related quality of life (mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain/discomfort and anxiety/depression).

Results

Among the general characteristics, age, gender, educational level, income, and living status with spouse were the factors that affected self-rated oral health. Mastication, pronunciation, use of dentures, and brushing after lunch, dinner, and before sleep were the factors that influenced self-rated oral function. All domains of the EQ-5D (pain/discomfort, mobility, self-care, usual activities, and anxiety/depression) were factors that affected self-rated oral health.

Conclusion

The results of the current investigation suggest that the development of management and education strategies for oral health promotion in the elderly, should focus on improving oral function and oral health behavior, taking into account the socio-economic and demographic characteristics that have been shown to be associated with poor self-rated oral function.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Oral health status and behavior in elderly Koreans with periodontal disease
    Sae‐Rom Lee, Mi Ah Han, Jong Park, So Yeon Ryu, So Yeong Kim
    Journal of Public Health Dentistry.2022; 82(4): 378.     CrossRef
  • Oral health-related quality of life, probable depression and probable anxiety: evidence from a representative survey in Germany
    André Hajek, Hans-Helmut König
    BMC Oral Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated with Self‐reported Oral Health Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults in a Rural Province of Thailand
    Yaowapa Chantaraboot, Nithimar Sermsuti-anuwat
    Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare.2022; Volume 15: 2111.     CrossRef
  • Self-rated oral health among elderly patients attending a university dental hospital in Thailand: a telephone-based cross-sectional survey study
    Nithimar Sermsuti-anuwat, Narongrit Nampikul, Rawitsara Suwannimit, Weerachon Panthueng
    PeerJ.2022; 10: e14191.     CrossRef
  • Older adults’ perceptions of oral health and its influence on general health: A deductive direct content analysis
    Maria Snogren, Irene Eriksson, Maria Browall, Kristina Ek
    Nordic Journal of Nursing Research.2022; : 205715852211248.     CrossRef
COVID-19 in Nursing Facilities: Experience in Republic of Korea
Rok Song, Hee-Sook Kim, Seok-Ju Yoo, Kwan Lee, Ji-Hyuk Park, Joon Ho Jang, Gyoung-Sook Ahn, Jun-Nyun Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(4):164-169.   Published online August 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.4.04
  • 5,305 View
  • 136 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreaks in nursing facilities can easily lead to a high rate of infection and fatality. A surge in newly infected cases in the first quarter of 2020 in Gyeongsan-si, in the Republic of Korea, was followed by several outbreaks in nursing facilities in the same area. The aim of this study is to report on the epidemiological investigation and the management to reduce the infection rate in nursing facilities for older adults.

Methods

The municipal government and the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention performed an epidemiological investigation into 5 nursing facilities that reported a high number of COVID-19 infection cases from February to May 2020. COVID-19 infected cases in the facilities were investigated to identify the infection routes, and the fatality rate of the 5 facilities.

Results

The 5 facilities had a combined fatality rate of 12.2% (9 deceased among the 74 infected cases). The median age of the deceased was 87 years old (range: 82–91). The infection was first identified on February 27th, 2020, peaked on March 6th, and was last detected on March 24th, 2020.

Conclusion

Difficulties specific to such facilities included the delay in the recognition of symptoms and limitation in distancing. Tailored strategies such as daily monitoring of symptoms and proactive COVID-19 screening of quarantined residents, contributed to a decline in the infections in the facilities.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and corresponding control measures on long-term care facilities: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Jun Zhang, Yushan Yu, Mirko Petrovic, Xiaomei Pei, Qing-Bao Tian, Lei Zhang, Wei-Hong Zhang
    Age and Ageing.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Using Non-Pharmaceutical Interventions and High Isolation of Asymptomatic Carriers to Contain the Spread of SARS-CoV-2 in Nursing Homes
    Alec J. Schmidt, Yury García, Diego Pinheiro, Thomas A. Reichert, Miriam Nuño
    Life.2022; 12(2): 180.     CrossRef
  • An Experience of the Early Stage of COVID-19 Outbreak in Nursing Homes in Gyeonggi Province, Korea
    Gawon Choi, Na-young Kim, Seon-young Lee, Hae Deun Noh, Heeyoung Lee
    Korean Journal of Clinical Geriatrics.2022; 23(1): 27.     CrossRef
  • Promising Best Practices Implemented in Long- Term Care Facilities During the COVID-19 Pandemic to Address Social Isolation and Loneliness: A Scoping Review
    Idrissa Beogo, Nebila Jean-Claude Bationo, Stephanie Collin, Diane Tapp, Jean Ramdé, Marie-Pierre Gagnon, Eric Nguemeleu Tchouaket, Drissa Sia
    Journal of Long-Term Care.2022; 0(2022): 298.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiology and clinical features of COVID-19 outbreaks in aged care facilities: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Mohammad Rashidul Hashan, Nicolas Smoll, Catherine King, Hannah Ockenden-Muldoon, Jacina Walker, Andre Wattiaux, Julieanne Graham, Robert Booy, Gulam Khandaker
    EClinicalMedicine.2021; 33: 100771.     CrossRef
  • The experience of executing preventive measures to protect a nursing home in Taiwan from a COVID-19 outbreak
    Chia-Yu Huang, Yu-Hung Kuo, Shu-Ting Chuang, Hung-Rong Yen, Sio-Ian Tou
    European Geriatric Medicine.2021; 12(3): 609.     CrossRef
  • Everyday life in a Swedish nursing home during the COVID-19 pandemic: a qualitative interview study with persons 85 to 100 years
    Qarin Lood, Maria Haak, Synneve Dahlin-Ivanoff
    BMJ Open.2021; 11(6): e048503.     CrossRef
Effect of Obesity on Blood Pressure and Arterial Stiffness in Middle-Aged Korean Women
Won-Mok Son, Do-Yeon Kim, You-Sin Kim, Min-Seong Ha
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(6):369-372.   Published online December 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.6.02
  • 2,897 View
  • 36 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Our study aims to provide basic scientific data on the importance of obesity management in middle-aged Korean women by analyzing its effects on blood pressure and arterial stiffness. In addition, we examined the correlations of these two parameters.

Methods

The study participants were 40 middle-aged female volunteers, who were classified into obesity group (n = 20) and normal weight group (n = 20). Statistical analysis was performed using independent t-test and the Pearson correlation coefficient was used to correlate blood pressure and arterial stiffness.

Results

This study evaluated the systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and pulse wave velocity (PWV). These results were higher in the obesity group than the normal weight group. Furthermore, blood pressure and arterial stiffness (PWV, augmentation pressure) were static correlated.

Conclusion

Obesity is closely related to blood pressure and arterial stiffness. Therefore, indices for blood pressure and arterial stiffness may play a vital role in predicting and preventing obesity and its sequelae.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comparison of Vascular Function, Cardiometabolic Parameters, Hemorheological Function, and Cardiorespiratory Fitness Between Middle-Aged Korean Women With and Without Obesity—A Pilot Study
    Hun-Young Park, Won-Sang Jung, Sung-Woo Kim, Kyounghwa Jung, Kiwon Lim
    Frontiers in Physiology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparison of femoral and carotid arteries in terms of pulse check in cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A prospective observational study
    Gökhan Yılmaz, Oğuzhan Bol
    Resuscitation.2021; 162: 56.     CrossRef
  • Effect of yoga on pulse rate and blood pressure among women
    G Kaleeswari, CVasantha Kalyani, JS Jayarani, KusumK Rohilla
    Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care.2021; 10(10): 3670.     CrossRef
  • Association of obesity with arterial stiffness: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)
    Jeongok G. Logan, Hyojung Kang, Soyoun Kim, Daniel Duprez, Younghoon Kwon, David R. Jacobs, Nketi Forbang, Jennifer Mason Lobo, Min-Woong Sohn
    Vascular Medicine.2020; 25(4): 309.     CrossRef
  • The Feasibility and Applications of Non-invasive Cardiac Monitoring in Obese Patients Undergoing Day-case Surgery: Results of a Prospective Observational Study
    P. Sansone, L.G. Giaccari, U. Colella, F. Coppolino, M.C. Pace, M.B. Passavanti, V. Pota, C. Aurilio
    The Open Anesthesia Journal.2020; 14(1): 80.     CrossRef
  • The Impact of Obesity on Nighttime Blood Pressure Dipping
    Beata Moczulska, Maciej Zechowicz, Sylwia Leśniewska, Karolina Osowiecka, Leszek Gromadziński
    Medicina.2020; 56(12): 700.     CrossRef
  • Greater Adherence to Life’s Simple 7 Is Associated With Less Arterial Stiffness: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study
    Abayomi O Oyenuga, Aaron R Folsom, Susan Cheng, Hirofumi Tanaka, Michelle L Meyer
    American Journal of Hypertension.2019; 32(8): 769.     CrossRef
Different Effects of Cognitive and Non-exercise Physical Leisure Activities on Cognitive Function by Age in Elderly Korean Individuals
Mi Sook Jung, Hyunli Kim, Yeji Lee, Mijung Kim, Eunyoung Chung
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(5):308-317.   Published online October 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.5.04
  • 3,069 View
  • 37 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

We aimed to examine the effects of various leisure activities on cognitive impairment in young-old (aged 65–74 years) and old-old (aged ≥ 75 years) adults.

Methods

In total, 10,279 elderly Korean individuals from the 2014 Korean National Survey on Older Adults’ cohort were enrolled in our study. Cognitive impairment was assessed using the standardized score of the Mini-Mental State Examination for Dementia Screening, whereas leisure activities were recorded via self-reporting of the extent and type of leisure activity the subjects involved in over the past year. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the effect of leisure activities on cognitive impairment, while controlling for potential covariates.

Results

The subjects were more likely to participate in cognitive activities than in non-exercise physical activities. After controlling for selected covariates, involvement in cognitive activities was found to be a significant predictor of cognitive impairment in both the groups, whereas involvement in non-exercise physical activities was not a predictor of cognitive impairment in individuals aged ≥ 75 years. Moreover, depressive symptoms, rural residence, and hearing difficulties were common predictors of cognitive impairment among elderly-Korean-individuals.

Conclusion

Leisure activity involvement may help delay cognitive impairment, which is often concomitant with aging. Hence, an early intervention service may significantly benefit both young-old and old-old individuals.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Leisure activity and cognitive function among Chinese old adults: The multiple mediation effect of anxiety and loneliness
    Wenjun Li, Haiyan Sun, Wen Xu, Wenyuan Ma, Xin Yuan, Hao Wu, Changgui Kou
    Journal of Affective Disorders.2021; 294: 137.     CrossRef
  • Hearing Screening for Residents in Long-Term Care Homes Who Live with Dementia: A Scoping Review
    Fiona Höbler, Katherine S. McGilton, Walter Wittich, Kate Dupuis, Marilyn Reed, Shirley Dumassais, Paul Mick, M. Kathleen Pichora-Fuller
    Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.2021; 84(3): 1115.     CrossRef
  • Effects of non‐pharmacological therapies for people with mild cognitive impairment. A Bayesian network meta‐analysis
    Ying‐quan Wang, Rui‐xia Jia, Jing‐hong Liang, Jing Li, Sheng Qian, Jia‐yu Li, Yong Xu
    International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.2020; 35(6): 591.     CrossRef
  • Do Musicians Have Better Mnemonic and Executive Performance Than Actors? Influence of Regular Musical or Theater Practice in Adults and in the Elderly
    Mathilde Groussard, Renaud Coppalle, Thomas Hinault, Hervé Platel
    Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Television Viewing and Cognitive Dysfunction of Korean Older Adults
    Mi Sook Jung, Eunyoung Chung
    Healthcare.2020; 8(4): 547.     CrossRef
  • Associated factors for cognition of physically independent elderly people living in residential care facilities for the aged in Sri Lanka
    Madushika Wishvanie Kodagoda Gamage, Chandana Hewage, Kithsiri Dedduwa Pathirana
    BMC Psychiatry.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
Age-differentiated Risk Factors of Suicidal Ideation among Young and Middle-aged Korean Adults
Ahra Jo, Minho Jeon, Heeyoung Oh
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(3):201-210.   Published online June 30, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.3.07
  • 2,921 View
  • 29 Download
  • 14 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study aimed to determine the prevalence of suicidal ideation among young and middle-aged adults, and explore the risk factors that affect suicidal ideation.

Methods

A descriptive study design was used for secondary data analysis. A total sample of 5,214 was drawn from two waves (2012–2013) of the 7th Korea Health Panel (KHP) survey. The KHP data were collected by a well-trained interviewer using the face-to-face method during home visits as well as self-report method. Descriptive statistics of frequency, percentage, chi-square test, and logistic regression analysis were performed using SPSS 22.0.

Results

The prevalence of suicidal ideation in young and middle-aged adults was 4.4% and 5.6%, respectively. For young adults, suicidal ideation risk was higher among those with low income or heavy drinking habits. In middle-aged adults, low income, poor perceived health status, negative perception of peer-compared health status, and negative social perspective were the major risk factors.

Conclusion

There is considerable risk of suicidal ideation in adulthood. Opportunities for increased income, avoidance of heavy drinking, and the construction of positive subjective health status and social perspective should be considered in suicide prevention interventions for Korean young and middle-aged adults.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Spectrum and predictors of suicidal risk among incarcerated youth in a correctional facility in Kaduna, Northern Nigeria
    Marufah Dupe Lasisi, Folorunsho Tajudeen Nuhu, Femi Adebayo, Edwin Ehi Eseigbe, Taiwo Lateef Sheikh
    Vulnerable Children and Youth Studies.2022; 17(2): 147.     CrossRef
  • Alcohol use and its association with suicide attempt, suicidal thoughts and non-suicidal self-harm in two successive, nationally representative English household samples
    Sarah Ledden, Paul Moran, David Osborn, Alexandra Pitman
    BJPsych Open.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Associations between Suicidal Ideation and Relatives’ Physical and Mental Health among Community Residents: Differences between Family Members and Lineal Consanguinity
    Caifeng Li, Zhen Wei, Yifan Wang, Long Sun
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2022; 19(23): 15997.     CrossRef
  • Factors affecting suicidal ideation among premenopausal and postmenopausal women
    Go‐Un Kim, Hae Kyoung Son, Mi‐Young Kim
    Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing.2021; 28(3): 356.     CrossRef
  • Depression and suicidal ideation among HIV seropositive patients attending the special treatment clinic of the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria
    Elvis Mbu Bisong, Chidi John Okafor, Agam Ebaji Ayuk, Udeme Essien Asibong, Henry Ohem Okpa
    Calabar Journal of Health Sciences.2021; 4: 64.     CrossRef
  • The role of ageing in the wish to be dead: disentangling age, period and cohort effects in suicide ideation in European population
    M. Cabello, L. A. Rico-Uribe, J. C. Martinez-Ávila, A. Sánchez-Niubò, F. F. Caballero, G. Borges, B. Mellor-Marsá, J. M. Haro, M. Prina, S. Koskinen, J. L. Ayuso-Mateos
    Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association Between Suicide Risk and Comorbidity of Mood Disorder and Alcohol Use Disorder: Using Common Data Model in Psychiatry
    Yong Hyuk Cho, Eunyoung Lee, Eun Sil Her, Gyubeom Hwang, Ki-Young Lim, Jai Sung Noh, Yunmi Shin, Chang Hyung Hong, Hyun Woong Roh, Dongyun Lee, Heirim Lee, Doyeop Kim, Rae Woong Park, Bumhee Park, Sang Joon Son
    Journal of Korean Neuropsychiatric Association.2021; 60(3): 232.     CrossRef
  • Analysis of risk factors affecting suicidal ideation in South Korea by life cycle stage
    Ji-Young Hwang, Il-Su Park
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2021; 12(5): 314.     CrossRef
  • Association of chronic diseases and lifestyle factors with suicidal ideation among adults aged 18–69 years in Eswatini: evidence from a population-based survey
    Mfundi President Sebenele Motsa, Hung-Yi Chiou, Yi-Hua Chen
    BMC Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Cross-national prevalence and factors associated with suicide ideation and attempts in older and young-and-middle age people
    Maria Cabello, Marta Miret, José Luis Ayuso-Mateos, Felix Feliz Caballero, Somnath Chatterji, Beata Tobiasz-Adamczyk, Josep Maria Haro, Seppo Koskinen, Matilde Leonardi, Guilherme Borges
    Aging & Mental Health.2020; 24(9): 1533.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics, causality, and suicidal behavior: a qualitative study of family members with suicide history in Wonogiri, Indonesia
    Susana Nurtanti, Sri Handayani, Nita Yunianti Ratnasari, Putri Halimu Husna, Tantut Susanto
    Frontiers of Nursing.2020; 7(2): 169.     CrossRef
  • Risk Factors for Suicidal Ideation among Middle Class Korean: Focusing on Psychosocial Comparison - An Analysis of a Nationwide Survey of the 8th Korea Health Panel Data
    Ahra Jo, Bora Kang, Youngju Seo, Eunha Gil, Heeyoung Oh
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nurs.2018; 29(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • The Function of Personality in Suicidal Ideation from the Perspective of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide
    Marc Baertschi, Alessandra Costanza, Alessandra Canuto, Kerstin Weber
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2018; 15(4): 636.     CrossRef
  • To Be or Not to Be
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2017; 8(3): 157.     CrossRef
Experience of Late–Middle-Aged Women who Reside in Small and Medium-Sized Cities in Becoming Psychologically Mature Women
Euna Park, Haeok Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2015;6(3):159-163.   Published online June 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2015.04.002
  • 2,022 View
  • 17 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The purpose of this study is to search the inner world of postmenopausal women in late-middle age who are facing senescence and live in small and medium-sized cities.
Methods
The methods of the study were the investigation and classification of answers to questions according to a declarative ethnography analysis. The questions asked to late–middle-aged women living in small and medium-sized cities were “How do you interpret and recognize the changes in the body after menopause?” and “Which methods do you choose and practice to maintain your health in relation to aging during middle age?”.
Results
Four positive topics and two negative topics were drawn from the study. The four positive themes were: ambition; completion of a great mission; life with a sense of affection; and gratitude for maintaining health. The negative themes were: undulating emotion; and filling the emptiness.
Conclusion
The recognition of changes in the body after menopause in late–middle-aged women in small and medium-sized cities can affect their preparation processes towards senescence. It is critical to find the means to manage emergency health cases from early adulthood to middle age, based on the outcomes of the study. The study also emphasizes the importance of the woman's family's alternative strategies and supportive systems, which can fit into the cultural context of the community.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The experiences and needs of Asian women experiencing menopausal symptoms: a meta-synthesis
    Shefaly Shorey, Esperanza D. Ng
    Menopause.2019; 26(5): 557.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Aromatherapy on Menopausal Symptoms, Perceived Stress and Depression in Middle-aged Women: A Systematic Review
    Shinmi Kim, Ji-Ah Song, Mi-Eun Kim, Myung-Haeng Hur
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing.2016; 46(5): 619.     CrossRef
Are There Spatial and Temporal Correlations in the Incidence Distribution of Scrub Typhus in Korea?
Maengseok Noh, Youngjo Lee, Chaeshin Chu, Jin Gwack, Seung-Ki Youn, Sun Huh
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(1):39-44.   Published online February 28, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.01.002
  • 2,475 View
  • 21 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
A hierarchical generalized linear model (HGLM) was applied to estimate the transmission pattern of scrub typhus from 2001 to 2011 in the Republic of Korea, based on spatial and temporal correlation.
Methods
Based on the descriptive statistics of scrub typhus incidence from 2001 to 2011 reported to the Korean Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the spatial and temporal correlations were estimated by HGLM. Incidences according to age, sex, and year were also estimated by the best-fit model out of nine HGLMs. A disease map was drawn to view the annual regional spread of the disease.
Results
The total number of scrub typhus cases reported from 2001 to 2011 was 51,136: male, 18,628 (36.4%); female, 32,508 (63.6%). The best-fit model selected was a combination of the spatial model (Markov random-field model) and temporal model (first order autoregressive model) of scrub typhus transmission. The peak incidence was 28.80 per 100,000 persons in early October and the peak incidence was 40.17 per 100,000 persons in those aged 63.3 years old by the best-fit HGLM. The disease map showed the spread of disease from the southern central area to a nationwide area, excepting Gangwon-do (province), Gyeongsangbuk-do (province), and Seoul.
Conclusion
In the transmission of scrub typhus in Korea, there was a correlation to the incidence of adjacent areas, as well as that of the previous year. According to the disease map, we are unlikely to see any decrease in the incidence in the near future, unless ongoing aggressive measures to prevent the exposure to the vector, chigger mites, in rural areas, are put into place.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Epidemiological characteristics and spatiotemporal patterns of scrub typhus in Yunnan Province from 2006 to 2017
    Pei-Ying Peng, Lei Xu, Gu-Xian Wang, Wen-Yuan He, Ting-Liang Yan, Xian-Guo Guo
    Scientific Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Clinical and Laboratory Predictors associated with Complicated Scrub Typhus
    Mi-Hee Kim, Si-Hyun Kim, Jung-Hyun Choi, Seong-Heon Wie
    Infection & Chemotherapy.2019; 51(2): 161.     CrossRef
  • Awareness and Work-Related Factors Associated with Scrub Typhus: A Case-Control Study from South Korea
    Dong-Seob Kim, Dilaram Acharya, Kwan Lee, Seok-Ju Yoo, Ji-Hyuk Park, Hyun-Sul Lim
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2018; 15(6): 1143.     CrossRef
  • Estimating the burden of scrub typhus: A systematic review
    Ana Bonell, Yoel Lubell, Paul N. Newton, John A. Crump, Daniel H. Paris, Janet Foley
    PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.2017; 11(9): e0005838.     CrossRef
  • Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Scrub Typhus Transmission in Mainland China, 2006-2014
    Yi-Cheng Wu, Quan Qian, Ricardo J. Soares Magalhaes, Zhi-Hai Han, Wen-Biao Hu, Ubydul Haque, Thomas A. Weppelmann, Yong Wang, Yun-Xi Liu, Xin-Lou Li, Hai-Long Sun, Yan-Song Sun, Archie C. A. Clements, Shen-Long Li, Wen-Yi Zhang, Mathieu Picardeau
    PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.2016; 10(8): e0004875.     CrossRef
  • Larval Chigger Mites Collected from Small Mammals in 3 Provinces, Korea
    In-Yong Lee, Hyeon-Je Song, Yeon-Joo Choi, Sun-Hye Shin, Min-Kyung Choi, So-Hyun Kwon, E-Hyun Shin, Chan Park, Heung-Chul Kim, Terry A. Klein, Kyung-Hee Park, Won-Jong Jang
    The Korean Journal of Parasitology.2014; 52(2): 225.     CrossRef

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives