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Solitary and Social Drinking in South Korea: An Exploratory Study
Ju Moon Park, Aeree Sohn, Chanho Choi
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(6):365-372.   Published online December 22, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.6.04
  • 4,577 View
  • 120 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study aimed to identify differences in drinking norms, heavy drinking, and motives between types of drinkers (abstainers, solitary, and social drinkers) in a representative sample of Korean adults.

Methods

An online survey of people registered on the electoral roll were randomly invited to be part of the “National Korean Drinking Culture Study” conducted in 2018 (n = 3,015). Participants included 1,532 men and 1,469 women aged 19–60 years. Questions included the number of times they drank in the last month, what they drank, and the volume drank. The amount of pure alcohol consumed was calculated. Drinking norms, motives, and types were determined in the survey questions.

Results

Solitary drinkers were more likely to be divorced or separated, less educated, and marginally employed. Solitary drinking peaked in those in their 30s (18.5%) and social drinkers in their 50s (68.1%). Solitary drinkers drank more frequently compared with social drinkers (6.1 vs. 3.6 times per month, p < 0.001), and consumed a significantly larger quantity of alcohol (69.5 g vs. 46.8 g per week). Solitary drinkers were more accepting of drinking-related behaviors in diverse situations compared with social drinkers. The regression analysis revealed that personal drinking motives were the most important factor influencing the frequency and quantity of alcohol consumption in both solitary and social drinking.

Conclusion

Solitary drinkers may be more vulnerable to alcohol abuse than social drinkers.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Do Drinking Norms, Motives, and Drinking Behaviors Differ by Age Group among Korean Women?
    Aeree Sohn, Sarang Jang
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2022; 19(6): 3345.     CrossRef
  • Exploring Contributing Factors of Solitary Drinking among Hong Kong Chinese Adolescents and Young Adults: A Descriptive Phenomenology
    Ka-Yan Ho, Katherine-Ka-Wai Lam, Cynthia-Sau-Ting Wu, Man-Nok Tong, Lai-Ngo Tang, Yim-Wah Mak
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2022; 19(14): 8371.     CrossRef
Developing the High-Risk Drinking Scorecard Model in Korea
Jun-Tae Han, Il-Su Park, Suk-Bok Kang, Byeong-Gyu Seo
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2018;9(5):231-239.   Published online October 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2018.9.5.04
  • 14,853 View
  • 99 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study aimed to develop a high-risk drinking scorecard using cross-sectional data from the 2014 Korea Community Health Survey.

Methods

Data were collected from records for 149,592 subjects who had participated in the Korea Community Health Survey conducted from 2014. The scorecard model was developed using data mining, a scorecard and points to double the odds approach for weighted multiple logistic regression.

Results

This study found that there were many major influencing factors for high-risk drinkers which included gender, age, educational level, occupation, whether they received health check-ups, depressive symptoms, over-moderate physical activity, mental stress, smoking status, obese status, and regular breakfast. Men in their thirties to fifties had a high risk of being a drinker and the risks in office workers and sales workers were high. Those individuals who were current smokers had a higher risk of drinking. In the scorecard results, the highest score range was observed for gender, age, educational level, and smoking status, suggesting that these were the most important risk factors.

Conclusion

A credit risk scorecard system can be applied to quantify the scoring method, not only to help the medical service provider to understand the meaning, but also to help the general public to understand the danger of high-risk drinking more easily.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Study on ML-Based Sleep Score Model Using Lifelog Data
    Jiyong Kim, Minseo Park
    Applied Sciences.2023; 13(2): 1043.     CrossRef
  • A Simple-to-Use Score for Identifying Individuals at High Risk of Denosumab-Associated Hypocalcemia in Postmenopausal Osteoporosis: A Real-World Cohort Study
    Kyoung Jin Kim, Namki Hong, Seunghyun Lee, Miryung Kim, Yumie Rhee
    Calcified Tissue International.2020; 107(6): 567.     CrossRef
Korean Adolescents’ Health Behavior and Psychological Status according to Their Mother’s Nationality
Yunjeong Yi, Ji-Soo Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(6):377-383.   Published online December 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.6.04
  • 3,190 View
  • 23 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study was conducted to compare adolescents’ health behaviors and psychological status according to whether or not their mother was born in Korea.

Methods

This secondary analysis used nationally representative data from the 2015 Korean Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey. The self-administered questionnaire included computer measured socio-demographic variables, 15 health behaviors, and psychological status. Data from 65,426 middle school and high school students were analyzed. Multiple logistic regression, adjusting for socio-demographic variables, was used to analyze differences in health behaviors and psychological status between adolescents with a foreign-born mother and those with a Korean mother.

Results

Adolescents who have foreign-born mothers had a lower level of current drinking and subjective happiness, but a higher stress level.

Conclusion

The stress levels of the adolescents with foreign-born mothers could be affected by their multicultural background. It is necessary to analyze stress-influencing factors of multicultural adolescents by comparing them to adolescents from Korean parents. Additionally, our society should pay more attention to the mental health of multicultural adolescents. Schools should also make various efforts to protect multicultural adolescents by adopting mental health management programs led by school nurses and counselors.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Measuring Happiness in Adolescent Samples: A Systematic Review
    Justė Lukoševičiūtė, Gita Argustaitė-Zailskienė, Kastytis Šmigelskas
    Children.2022; 9(2): 227.     CrossRef
  • Factors Related to Depressive Symptoms Among Multicultural Adolescents in Korea
    Kyoung Hwa Joung, Sung Suk Chung
    The Journal of School Nursing.2022; 38(2): 138.     CrossRef
  • The Mental Health of Ethnic Minority Youths in South Korea and Its Related Environmental Factors: A Literature Review
    Yeeun Lee, Minji Lee, Subin Park
    Journal of the Korean Academy of Child and Adolesc.2019; 30(3): 88.     CrossRef
  • Adolescents in Multi-Ethnic Families under Korean Ethnic Nationalism
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2017; 8(6): 367.     CrossRef
Relationship Between Water Intake and Metabolic/Heart Diseases: Based on Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
Soobin Jang, Chunhoo Cheon, Bo-Hyoung Jang, Sunju Park, So-Mi Oh, Yong-Cheol Shin, Seong-Gyu Ko
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(5):289-295.   Published online October 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2016.08.007
  • 2,150 View
  • 22 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The aim of this study was to identify the correlation between adequate water intake and the prevalence of metabolic/heart diseases.
Methods
We analyzed the data from the 2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. All participants were divided into Group Above Adequate Intake (n = 736) and Group Below Adequate Intake (n = 4,819) according to water intake. The thresholds were 1.8 L for men and 1.4 L for women based on the World Health Organization report findings. Logistic regression analyses were performed to verify the correlation between water intake and prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, myocardial infarction, and angina pectoris.
Results
There were significant differences between the two groups in terms of the following variables: age, smoking, alcohol, stress, dietary supplements, body weight, physical activity, total calorie intake, water intakes from food, and sodium intake. Participants in Group Above Adequate Intake showed a higher prevalence of hypertension [odds ratio (OR) = 1.22; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.58–2.55], diabetes mellitus (OR = 1.38; 95% CI, 0.51–3.73), angina pectoris (OR = 0.94; 95% CI, 0.47–1.86), and myocardial infarction (OR = 5.36; 95% CI, 0.67–43.20) than those in Group Below Adequate Intake, whereas the latter showed a slightly higher prevalence of dyslipidemia (OR = 2.25; 95% CI, 0.88–57.84) than the former.
Conclusion
There was no statistically significant association between water intake and any of the metabolic/heart diseases. However, further studies on water intake are needed to confirm our findings.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Water intake and risk of type 2 diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies
    Nasim Janbozorgi, Ramesh Allipour, Kurosh Djafarian, Sakineh Shab-Bidar, Mostafa Badeli, Maryam Safabakhsh
    Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research &.2021; 15(4): 102156.     CrossRef
  • Changes in feed consumption and water intake among broiler chickens subjected to melatonin treatment during the hot-dry season
    Victor Olusegun Sinkalu, Joseph Olusegun Ayo, Joseph Olajide Hambolu, Alexander Babatunde Adelaiye, Friday Ocheja Zakari, Tagang Aluwong
    Tropical Animal Health and Production.2020; 52(2): 717.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of Dietary Habit and Nutritional Intake of Korean Elderly: Data from Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2013∼2015
    Gyusang Han, Eunju Yang
    Journal of the East Asian Society of Dietary Life.2018; 28(4): 258.     CrossRef
  • Water intake from foods and beverages and risk of mortality from CVD: the Japan Collaborative Cohort (JACC) Study
    Renzhe Cui, Hiroyasu Iso, Ehab S Eshak, Koutatsu Maruyama, Akiko Tamakoshi
    Public Health Nutrition.2018; 21(16): 3011.     CrossRef
Smoking and Alcohol Drinking Related to Experience of Harmful Shops among Korean Adolescents
Jinyoung Kim, Aeree Sohn
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(3):138-147.   Published online June 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.04.005
  • 1,888 View
  • 16 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study was conducted in order to determine any correlation between experience of harmful shops and adolescent smoking and alcohol drinking in middle and high school students.
Methods
The survey was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire online via the homepage of the Ministry of Education student Health Information Center; 1888 and 1563 questionnaires were used for middle and high school students, respectively, for a total of 3451 questionnaires in the final analysis. The collected data were processed using SPSS version 21.0 and examined using frequency analysis and hierarchical linear regression.
Results
In this research, 8.3% of all participants were found to have experienced smoking and 17.0% alcohol drinking. Regarding the types of harmful shops, 81.8% said they had been to a gaming place; 21.2% to a lodging place; 16.0% to a sex and entertainment place; and 6.8% to a harmful sex industry location. Sociodemographic variables had a significant effect on adolescent smoking and alcohol drinking. Regarding environmental variables, a significant difference was observed for living with parents and school location. Among adolescent experience of harmful shops, both smoking and alcohol drinking showed a significant association with harmful sex industry locations.
Conclusion
National government-level management and supervision on this issue will be necessary to prevent adolescent access to harmful shops, along with more studies exploring methods for implementation of policies with more systematic control of harmful shops.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Evaluation of Individual and Community Factors Affecting Adolescents’ Mental Health: A Longitudinal Multilevel Analysis
    Bohye Lee, Myungsuk Choi, Mankyu Choi
    Applied Research in Quality of Life.2021; 16(3): 1187.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and Extrinsic Risk Factors for Dental Erosion in Adolescents
    Ana C Mafla, Ximena A Cerón-Bastidas, Maria E Munoz-Ceballos, Diana C Vallejo-Bravo, Maria C Fajardo-Santacruz
    Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry.2017; 41(2): 102.     CrossRef
  • Trend of Suicide Rates According to Urbanity among Adolescents by Gender and Suicide Method in Korea, 1997–2012
    Kyung-Hwa Choi, Dong-Hyun Kim
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2015; 12(5): 5129.     CrossRef
  • The awareness of "School Environmental Sanitation and Cleanup Zone System" and harmful perception by shops among students, teachers and parents in Korea
    Aeree Sohn
    Korean Journal of Health Education and Promotion.2015; 32(5): 83.     CrossRef
  • Substance Use and Sexual Behaviors of Adolescents in Multicultural Families in Korea
    Subin Park
    Psychiatry Investigation.2015; 12(4): 466.     CrossRef
  • Health-related quality of life assessment according to socio-demographic characteristics and health behavior among Gyeonggi-do citizens: focused on gender difference
    Sun-Hee Joung, YeogSeon Hong, AeRee Sohn
    Korean Journal of Health Education and Promotion.2015; 32(3): 33.     CrossRef
  • A Period of Storm and Stress
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2014; 5(3): 117.     CrossRef
  • Characterizing Patterns of Experience of Harmful Shops among Adolescents Using Decision Tree Models
    Aeree Sohn
    Korean Journal of Health Education and Promotion.2014; 31(3): 15.     CrossRef
A Study of High-Risk Drinking Patterns Among Generations Based on the 2009 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
Yeongseon Hong, Sungsoo Chun, Mieun Yun, Lydia Sarponmaa Asante, Chaeshin Chu
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(1):46-53.   Published online February 28, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.01.006
  • 1,884 View
  • 15 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The aim of this study was to identify how the drinking patterns of a generation on the paternal side affect those of the next generations by estimating the number of high-risk drinkers by generation according to the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test.
Methods
Data were selected from the 2009 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and were analyzed using SPSS 18.0.
Results
Later generations started drinking earlier (62.4%, 71.8% and 91.1%, respectively). The majority of the second generation consumed more than 2–4 drinks a month (83.7%), but only a small proportion experienced difficulty in everyday life (9.6%), felt repentance (9.6%), or experienced memory loss (17.9%) after drinking. Unmarried third-generation adults with high-risk-drinking fathers reported more frequent alcohol consumption [odds ratio (OR) 1.441), greater amounts on one occasion (>7 cups for men, OR 1.661; > 5 cups for women, OR 2.078), temperance failure (OR 2.377), and repentance after drinking (OR 1.577). Unmarried third-generation adults with high-risk-drinking grandfathers consumed greater amounts of alcohol on one occasion (OR 3.642), and unmarried third-generation women more frequently consumed large amounts of alcohol (>5 cups, OR 4.091). Unmarried third-generation adults with high-risk-drinking fathers were more likely to exhibit high-risk drinking patterns (OR 1.608). Second-generation individuals from a high-risk-drinking first generation were more likely to engage in high-risk drinking (OR 3.705).
Conclusion
High-risk drinking by a generation significantly affects the high-risk drinking patterns of subsequent generations.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Age at onset of alcohol consumption and its association with alcohol misuse in adulthood
    Soo Y. Kim, Sung H. Jeong, Eun‐Cheol Park
    Neuropsychopharmacology Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Alcohol consumption frequency or alcohol intake per drinking session: Which has a larger impact on the metabolic syndrome and its components?
    Sarah Soyeon Oh, Woorim Kim, Kyu-Tae Han, Eun-Cheol Park, Sung-In Jang
    Alcohol.2018; 71: 15.     CrossRef

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives