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Original Article
A Study of High-Risk Drinking Patterns Among Generations Based on the 2009 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
Yeongseon Hong, Sungsoo Chun, Mieun Yun, Lydia Sarponmaa Asante, Chaeshin Chu
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(1):46-53.   Published online February 28, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.01.006
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The aim of this study was to identify how the drinking patterns of a generation on the paternal side affect those of the next generations by estimating the number of high-risk drinkers by generation according to the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test.
Methods
Data were selected from the 2009 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and were analyzed using SPSS 18.0.
Results
Later generations started drinking earlier (62.4%, 71.8% and 91.1%, respectively). The majority of the second generation consumed more than 2–4 drinks a month (83.7%), but only a small proportion experienced difficulty in everyday life (9.6%), felt repentance (9.6%), or experienced memory loss (17.9%) after drinking. Unmarried third-generation adults with high-risk-drinking fathers reported more frequent alcohol consumption [odds ratio (OR) 1.441), greater amounts on one occasion (>7 cups for men, OR 1.661; > 5 cups for women, OR 2.078), temperance failure (OR 2.377), and repentance after drinking (OR 1.577). Unmarried third-generation adults with high-risk-drinking grandfathers consumed greater amounts of alcohol on one occasion (OR 3.642), and unmarried third-generation women more frequently consumed large amounts of alcohol (>5 cups, OR 4.091). Unmarried third-generation adults with high-risk-drinking fathers were more likely to exhibit high-risk drinking patterns (OR 1.608). Second-generation individuals from a high-risk-drinking first generation were more likely to engage in high-risk drinking (OR 3.705).
Conclusion
High-risk drinking by a generation significantly affects the high-risk drinking patterns of subsequent generations.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Age at onset of alcohol consumption and its association with alcohol misuse in adulthood
    Soo Y. Kim, Sung H. Jeong, Eun‐Cheol Park
    Neuropsychopharmacology Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Alcohol consumption frequency or alcohol intake per drinking session: Which has a larger impact on the metabolic syndrome and its components?
    Sarah Soyeon Oh, Woorim Kim, Kyu-Tae Han, Eun-Cheol Park, Sung-In Jang
    Alcohol.2018; 71: 15.     CrossRef

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives