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Brief Report
Early Intervention Reduces the Spread of COVID-19 in Long-Term Care Facilities in the Republic of Korea
Shin Young Park, Gawon Choi, Hyeyoung Lee, Na-young Kim, Seon-young Lee, Kyungnam Kim, Soyoung Shin, Eunsu Jang, YoungSin Moon, KwangHwan Oh, JaeRin Choi, Sangeun Lee, Young-Man Kim, Jieun Kim, Seonju Yi, Jin Gwack, Ok Park, Young Joon Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(4):259-264.   Published online August 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.4.16
  • 4,432 View
  • 132 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

This study describes the epidemiological characteristics of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) based on reported cases from long-term care facilities. As of April 20th, 2020, 3 long-term care facilities in a metropolitan area of South Korea had reported cases of COVID-19. These facilities’ employees were presumed to be the sources of infection. There were 2 nursing hospitals that did not report any additional cases. One nursing home had a total of 25 cases, with an attack rate of 51.4% (95% CI 35.6–67.0), and a fatality rate of 38.9% (95% CI 20.3–61.4) among residents. The results from this study suggest that early detection and maintenance of infection control minimizes the risk of rapid transmission.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Staffing Levels and COVID-19 Infections and Deaths in Korean Nursing Homes
    Jiyeon Lee, Juh Hyun Shin, Kyeong Hun Lee, Charlene A. Harrington, Sun Ok Jung
    Policy, Politics, & Nursing Practice.2022; 23(1): 15.     CrossRef
  • An Experience of the Early Stage of COVID-19 Outbreak in Nursing Homes in Gyeonggi Province, Korea
    Gawon Choi, Na-young Kim, Seon-young Lee, Hae Deun Noh, Heeyoung Lee
    Korean Journal of Clinical Geriatrics.2022; 23(1): 27.     CrossRef
  • The implications of the COVID-19 pandemic for long term care facilities
    Muh-Yong Yen, Jonathan Schwartz, Po-Ren Hsueh
    Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases.2022; 35(4): 370.     CrossRef
  • Health impact of the first and second wave of COVID-19 and related restrictive measures among nursing home residents: a scoping review
    Marjolein E. A. Verbiest, Annerieke Stoop, Aukelien Scheffelaar, Meriam M. Janssen, Leonieke C. van Boekel, Katrien G. Luijkx
    BMC Health Services Research.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Epidemiology and clinical features of COVID-19 outbreaks in aged care facilities: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Mohammad Rashidul Hashan, Nicolas Smoll, Catherine King, Hannah Ockenden-Muldoon, Jacina Walker, Andre Wattiaux, Julieanne Graham, Robert Booy, Gulam Khandaker
    EClinicalMedicine.2021; 33: 100771.     CrossRef
  • Protecting Nursing Homes and Long-Term Care Facilities From COVID-19: A Rapid Review of International Evidence
    Sally Hall Dykgraaf, Sethunya Matenge, Jane Desborough, Elizabeth Sturgiss, Garang Dut, Leslee Roberts, Alison McMillan, Michael Kidd
    Journal of the American Medical Directors Associat.2021; 22(10): 1969.     CrossRef
  • Dementia Risk among Coronavirus Disease Survivors: A Nationwide Cohort Study in South Korea
    Hye-Yoon Park, In-Ae Song, Tak-Kyu Oh
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2021; 11(10): 1015.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Predictors Affecting the Elderly’s Use of Emergency Medical Services
Ju Moon Park, Aeree Sohn
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(4):209-215.   Published online August 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.4.10
  • 3,182 View
  • 60 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Elderly adults are the demographic most likely to utilize emergency medical services (EMS). This study aimed to examine the difference in EMS utilization in subgroups of the elderly population by assessing the predictors for using EMS.

Methods

Using both descriptive and logistic regression analyses, this study analyses data from the 2014 Korean Health Panel Survey (n = 3,175).

Results

It was observed that certain predisposing factors such as age, sex, and marital status were significant predictors of EMS utilization. However, differences in EMS need do not fully account for the original differences observed between subgroups of elderly Koreans. While health status and disability were important predictors of elderly Koreans using EMS, place of residence did not account for subgroup differences. Nonetheless, place of residence remained particularly important predictors of EMS utilization for the elderly.

Conclusion

Emergency needs and resource availability are 2 main determinants for elderly Koreans using EMS. In addition, it was observed that the demographic subgroup profile of unmarried/divorced/separated/widowed men who were aged 75 and older was least likely to utilize EMS. Improving their resource availability to meet their EMS needs should be a top priority for national policy making to narrow elderly population subgroup differences.

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  • Social Factors Contributing to Healthcare Service Requirements during the First COVID-19 Lockdown among Older Adults
    Ohad Shaked, Liat Korn, Yair Shapiro, Avi Zigdon
    Healthcare.2022; 10(10): 1854.     CrossRef
Neighborhood Deprivation and Unmet Health Care Needs: A Multilevel Analysis of Older Individuals in South Korea
Seung Eun Lee, Miyeon Yeon, Chul-Woung Kim, Tae-Ho Yoon, Dongjin Kim, Jihee Choi
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(5):295-306.   Published online October 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.5.06
  • 9,535 View
  • 42 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

In this study the relationship between neighborhood deprivation and the unmet health care needs of elderly individuals (≥ 65 years) was examined. Some previous studies suggested that neighborhood characteristics affect access to health care, yet research on the unmet needs of older individuals is limited.

Methods

Multilevel logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship of neighborhood-level factors with unmet health care needs due to costs, adjusting for individual-level factors, in individuals ≥ 65 years in the 2017 Korean Community Health Survey (n = 63,388).

Results

There were 2.6% of elderly individuals who experienced unmet health care needs due to costs. Following adjustment for individual and neighborhood characteristics, the neighborhood deprivation in urban areas was found to have an inverse association with unmet needs (odds ratio = 0.50; 95% confidence interval = 0.24–1.06) for the most deprived quartile versus the least deprived quartile). However, in rural areas neighborhood deprivation was not a significant variable. Among the individual-level variables, household income was one of the strongest correlates with unmet needs in both urban and rural areas.

Conclusion

The present findings suggest that targeted policy interventions reflecting both neighborhood and individual characteristics, should be implemented to reduce the unmet health care needs of elderly individuals.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Older Persons' Index of Multiple Deprivation: Measuring the deprivation circumstances of older populations in Aotearoa New Zealand
    Daniel J. Exeter, Michael Browne, Tommi Robinson-Chen, Jessie Colbert, Ngaire Kerse, Arier Lee
    Health & Place.2022; 76: 102850.     CrossRef
  • The Contribution of Material, Behavioral, Psychological, and Social-Relational Factors to Income-Related Disparities in Cardiovascular Risk Among Older Adults
    Chiyoung Lee, Qing Yang, Eun-Ok Im, Eleanor Schildwachter McConnell, Sin-Ho Jung, Hyeoneui Kim
    Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing.2021; 36(4): E38.     CrossRef
  • Association between community deprivation and practising health behaviours among South Korean adults: a survey-based cross-sectional study
    Bich Na Jang, Hin Moi Youn, Doo Woong Lee, Jae Hong Joo, Eun-Cheol Park
    BMJ Open.2021; 11(6): e047244.     CrossRef
Factors Affecting Activity Limitation in the Elderly: Data Processed from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2016
Jong-Hoon Moon
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(3):117-122.   Published online June 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.3.02
  • 4,023 View
  • 34 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The aim of this study was to compare the sociodemographic characteristics, depression, and the health-related quality of life outcome, among the Korean elderly population, with and without activity limitation.

Methods

The data used was drawn from the raw data of the seventh Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (N = 8,150). There were 1,632 records for individuals aged 65 or older extracted from the seventh Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey database, 199 of those had missing responses (n = 1,433). Differences within the sociodemographic characteristic, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and the EuroQol-5 Dimension were analyzed using logistic regression analysis according to the presence or absence of activity limitation.

Results

The prevalence of activity limitation among the elderly individuals surveyed was 19.9%. In the unadjusted regression analysis, the odds ratios of all independent variables (age, gender, education level, type of region, family income, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, all 5 domains of the EuroQol-5 Dimension) between the elderly individuals with and without activity limitation, were significant. Although, in the adjusted logistic regression analysis, it was observed that the only factors that were significantly associated with activity limitation were the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, EuroQol-5 Dimension, type of region, and family income.

Conclusion

These findings demonstrated that activity limitation in elderly individuals is associated with the sociodemographic characteristics of family income and type of region of residence, as well as depression and the health-related quality of life outcome.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Associations between Depressive Symptoms and Satisfaction with Meaningful Activities in Community-Dwelling Japanese Older Adults
    Michio Maruta, Hyuma Makizako, Yuriko Ikeda, Hironori Miyata, Atsushi Nakamura, Gwanghee Han, Suguru Shimokihara, Keiichiro Tokuda, Takuro Kubozono, Mitsuru Ohishi, Kounosuke Tomori, Takayuki Tabira
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2020; 9(3): 795.     CrossRef
Mediating and Moderating Effects in Ageism and Depression among the Korean Elderly: The Roles of Emotional Reactions and Coping Reponses
Il-Ho Kim, Samuel Noh, Heeran Chun
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(1):3-11.   Published online February 28, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2015.11.012
  • 2,071 View
  • 23 Download
  • 18 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study evaluated the relationship between ageism and depression, exploring the stress-mediating and stress-moderating roles of emotional reactions and coping behaviors.
Methods
Data were from the 2013 Ageism and Health Study (n = 816), a cross-sectional survey of urban and rural community-dwelling seniors aged 60–89 years in South Korea. Participants with at least one experience of ageism reported on their emotional reactions and coping responses. The measure yielded two types of coping: problem-focused (taking formal action, confrontation, seeking social support) and emotion-focused (passive acceptance, emotional discharge).
Results
Although ageism was significantly associated with depressive symptoms (B = 0.27, p < 0.0001), the association was entirely mediated by emotional reactions such as anger, sadness, and powerlessness. Problem-focused coping, especially confrontation and social support, seemingly reduced the impact of emotional reactions on depression, whereas emotion-focused coping exacerbated the adverse effects.
Conclusion
These findings support the cultural characterization explanation of ageism and related coping processes among Korean elderly and suggest that regulating emotional reactions may determine the efficacy of coping with ageism.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association Between Self-Perceived Stigma and Quality of Life Among Urban Chinese Older Adults: The Moderating Role of Attitude Toward Own Aging and Traditionality
    Tao Sun, Shu-E Zhang, Meng-yao Yan, Ting-hui Lian, Yi-qi Yu, Hong-yan Yin, Chen-xi Zhao, Yan-ping Wang, Xiao Chang, Ke-yu Ji, Si-yu Cheng, Xiao-he Wang, Xian-hong Huang, De-pin Cao
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • You’re Too Old for That! Ageism and Prescriptive Stereotypes in the Workplace
    Elizabeth A Hanrahan, Courtney L Thomas, Lisa M Finkelstein, Mo Wang
    Work, Aging and Retirement.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Ageism and Psychological Well-Being Among Older Adults: A Systematic Review
    Hyun Kang, Hansol Kim
    Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine.2022; 8: 233372142210870.     CrossRef
  • The Subjective Experience of Ageism: The Perceived Ageism Questionnaire (PAQ)
    Lotte P. Brinkhof, Sanne de Wit, Jaap M. J. Murre, Harm J. Krugers, K. Richard Ridderinkhof
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2022; 19(14): 8792.     CrossRef
  • Depressive Symptoms and Ageism among Nursing Home Residents: The Role of Social Support
    Dongjuan Xu, Yaqi Wang, Ming Li, Meng Zhao, Zhenhua Yang, Kefang Wang
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2022; 19(19): 12105.     CrossRef
  • Coping Style, Insomnia, and Psychological Distress Among Persons With Gastrointestinal Cancer
    Gaorong Lv, Di Zhao, Guopeng Li, Qing Wang, Miao Zhou, Yiming Gao, Xiangyu Zhao, Ping Li
    Nursing Research.2022; 71(6): 450.     CrossRef
  • Assessing knowledge and ageist attitudes and behaviors toward older adults among undergraduate nursing students
    Mohammad Rababa, Tariq Al-Dwaikat, Maysa H. Almomani
    Gerontology & Geriatrics Education.2021; 42(3): 347.     CrossRef
  • Day-to-Day Variability in Subjective Age and Ageist Attitudes and Their Association With Depressive Symptoms
    Ehud Bodner, Amit Shrira, Yaakov Hoffman, Yoav S Bergman, Shevaun Neupert
    The Journals of Gerontology: Series B.2021; 76(5): 836.     CrossRef
  • Association of nurses’ characteristics and level of knowledge with ageist attitudes toward older adults: a systematic review
    Mohammad Rababa, Ammar M. Hammouri, Sami Al-Rawashdeh
    Working with Older People.2021; 25(1): 21.     CrossRef
  • Associations of perceived poor societal treatment among the oldest-old
    M Knuutila, TE Lehti, H Karppinen, H Kautiainen, TE Strandberg, KH Pitkala
    Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics.2021; 93: 104318.     CrossRef
  • Ageism and the Factors Affecting Ageism among Korean Nursing Students: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Jiyeon Ha, Juah Kim
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2021; 18(4): 1798.     CrossRef
  • Psychometrics of Persian Version of the Ageism Survey Among an Iranian Older Adult Population During COVID-19 Pandemic
    Hamid Sharif Nia, Long She, Ratneswary Rasiah, Fatemeh Khoshnavay Fomani, Omolhoda Kaveh, Saeed Pahlevan Sharif, Lida Hosseini
    Frontiers in Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Global reach of ageism on older persons’ health: A systematic review
    E-Shien Chang, Sneha Kannoth, Samantha Levy, Shi-Yi Wang, John E. Lee, Becca R. Levy, Antony Bayer
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(1): e0220857.     CrossRef
  • The Role of Socio-demographics in Adoption of Religious–Spiritual and Other Coping Strategies Among Muslim Chronic Patients with Hepatitis C in Pakistan
    Malik Muhammad Sohail, Saeed Ahmad, Fauzia Maqsood
    Journal of Religion and Health.2020; 59(1): 234.     CrossRef
  • Association of nurses' level of knowledge and attitudes to ageism toward older adults: Cross‐sectional study
    Mohammad Rababa, Ammar M. Hammouri, Issa M. Hweidi, Julie L. Ellis
    Nursing & Health Sciences.2020; 22(3): 593.     CrossRef
  • How does ageism influence frailty? A preliminary study using a structural equation model
    Bo Ye, Junling Gao, Hua Fu, Hao Chen, Wenjing Dong, Ming Gu
    BMC Geriatrics.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Ageism, Attitudes Toward Aging, and Body Satisfaction by Subjective Socioeconomic and Health Status Among Older Women
    Haekyung Yu, Minsun Lee
    Fashion & Textile Research Journal.2019; 21(5): 586.     CrossRef
  • Where are we now in relation to determining the prevalence of ageism in this era of escalating population ageing?
    Donna M. Wilson, Begoña Errasti-Ibarrondo, Gail Low
    Ageing Research Reviews.2019; 51: 78.     CrossRef
Comparison of Consensus on Life-sustaining Treatment of the Elderly in Care Facilities and Family Member Dyad
Sunmi Lim, Seong Ae Hong, Hyun Sook Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2015;6(2):126-132.   Published online April 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2015.02.003
  • 1,840 View
  • 15 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The purpose of this study is to compare the agreement in opinion between the elderly in care facilities and their family members regarding the life-sustaining treatment at the deathbed and to find out if the intentions of the elderly are being properly reflected in their deathbed treatment.
Methods
Data were collected from 85 elderly individuals at five care facilities in Chunkcheongnam-do and 85 family members. The data were collected with a self-administered questionnaire from July 22, 2013 to August 15, 2014. A total of 170 cases were analyzed using SPSS version 21.
Results
First, the family members' preference for life-sustaining treatment was higher than the patients' preference. The preference between the elderly and their family members regarding life-sustaining treatment was statistically significant with regards to oral nutrition, pain control through oral and anal administration, pain control through intravenous administration, transfusion, and admission to an intensive care unit. Second, looking at the agreement between elderly and guardians regarding life-sustaining treatment, there was significant concordance about general testing, oral nutrition, intravenous hydration, intravenous nutrition, antibiotic treatment for severe infection with low resiliency, admission to an intensive care unit, blood pressure increase medication use, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and tracheotomy.
Conclusion
It is essential for the medical staff to confirm agreement between the elderly and their family members regarding life-sustaining treatment, and if such a prior agreement is not feasible, the patient's intention should be considered more actionable than their family members.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Analysis of high-intensity care in intensive care units and its cost at the end of life among older people in South Korea between 2016 and 2019: a cross-sectional study of the health insurance review and assessment service national patient sample database
    Yunji Lee, Minjeong Jo, Taehwa Kim, Kyoungsun Yun
    BMJ Open.2021; 11(8): e049711.     CrossRef
  • Effect of the Contents in Advance Directives on Individuals’ Decision-Making
    Jae Yoon Park, Chi-Yeon Lim, Gloria Puurveen, Do Yeun Kim, Jae Hang Lee, Han Ho Do, Kyung Soo Kim, Kyung Don Yoo, Hyo Jin Kim, Yunmi Kim, Sung Joon Shin
    OMEGA - Journal of Death and Dying.2020; 81(3): 436.     CrossRef
  • Do medical oncology patients and their support persons agree about end‐of‐life issues?
    Amy Waller, Alix Hall, Rob Sanson‐Fisher, Nicholas Zdenkowski, Charles Douglas, Justin Walsh
    Internal Medicine Journal.2018; 48(1): 60.     CrossRef
  • Preferences of older inpatients and their family caregivers for life-sustaining treatments in South Korea
    Hyeyoung Hwang, Sook Ja Yang, Sarah Yeun-Sim Jeong
    Geriatric Nursing.2018; 39(4): 428.     CrossRef

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives