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Original Article
Impact of long COVID-19 on posttraumatic stress disorder as modified by health literacy: an observational study in Vietnam
Han Thi Vo, Tien Duc Dao, Tuyen Van Duong, Tan Thanh Nguyen, Binh Nhu Do, Tinh Xuan Do, Khue Minh Pham, Vinh Hai Vu, Linh Van Pham, Lien Thi Hong Nguyen, Lan Thi Huong Le, Hoang Cong Nguyen, Nga Hoang Dang, Trung Huu Nguyen, Anh The Nguyen, Hoan Van Nguyen, Phuoc Ba Nguyen, Hoai Thi Thanh Nguyen, Thu Thi Minh Pham, Thuy Thi Le, Thao Thi Phuong Nguyen, Cuong Quoc Tran, Kien Trung Nguyen
Received September 15, 2023  Accepted January 12, 2024  Published online February 19, 2024  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2023.0261    [Epub ahead of print]
  • 61 View
  • 5 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The incidence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has increased, particularly among individuals who have recovered from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. Health literacy is considered a “social vaccine” that helps people respond effectively to the pandemic. We aimed to investigate the association between long COVID-19 and PTSD, and to examine the modifying role of health literacy in this association.
Methods
A cross-sectional study was conducted at 18 hospitals and health centers in Vietnam from December 2021 to October 2022. We recruited 4,463 individuals who had recovered from COVID-19 infection for at least 4 weeks. Participants provided information about their sociodemographics, clinical parameters, health-related behaviors, health literacy (using the 12-item short-form health literacy scale), long COVID-19 symptoms and PTSD (Impact Event Scale-Revised score of 33 or higher). Logistic regression models were used to examine associations and interactions.
Results
Out of the study sample, 55.9% had long COVID-19 symptoms, and 49.6% had PTSD. Individuals with long COVID-19 symptoms had a higher likelihood of PTSD (odds ratio [OR], 1.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.63–2.12; p<0.001). Higher health literacy was associated with a lower likelihood of PTSD (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.97–0.99; p=0.001). Compared to those with long COVID-19 symptoms and the lowest health literacy score, those with long COVID-19 symptoms and a 1-point health literacy increment had a 3% lower likelihood of PTSD (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.96–0.99; p=0.001).
Conclusion
Health literacy was found to be a protective factor against PTSD and modified the negative impact of long COVID-19 symptoms on PTSD.
Special Article
Activities of the Republic of Korea in the Global Health Security Agenda
Gang Lip Kim, Sookhyun Lee, So Yoon Kim
Received June 14, 2023  Accepted December 28, 2023  Published online February 19, 2024  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2023.0157    [Epub ahead of print]
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AbstractAbstract PDF
The government of the Republic of Korea has been an active participant in the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) since its inception in 2014. The country’s experiences with Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) in 2015 and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) from 2018 to 2023 underscored the critical importance of capacities for prevention, detection, and response in health security. During the transition from the first phase (2014–2018) to the second phase (2018–2023) of the GHSA, the Republic of Korea hosted 2 Ministerial Meetings, resulting in the Seoul Declaration and the subsequent New Seoul Declaration. The nation has also played a pivotal role in the Steering Group and Action Packages. Specifically, at the Seventh Ministerial Meeting in 2022, the Republic of Korea spearheaded the Immunization Action Package Expert Forum. Additionally, within the Legal Preparedness Action Package, the Republic of Korea shared examples of how its revised legal framework, updated in response to MERS, was applied during the COVID-19 pandemic. Moreover, with the announcement of the establishment of the Global Health Security Coordinating Office, the Republic of Korea aims to facilitate coordination and create a platform for communication and cooperation among GHSA Action Package members at various levels.
Original Articles
The effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on the trends and characteristics of natural and unnatural deaths in an urban Sri Lankan cohort viewed through retrospective analysis of forensic death investigations from 2019 to 2022
Sameera Anuruddha Gunawardena, Nishani Dassanayake, Buddhika Indeewarie Keerawelle, Shivasankarie Kanthasamy, Hasini Ranganatha, Jayani Wathsala Gunawardana
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2023;14(6):468-482.   Published online November 23, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2023.0175
  • 862 View
  • 32 Download
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a severe impact on global health. Apart from the disease itself, the strict restrictions and lockdowns enforced to minimize its spread have also substantially disrupted personal and public health. Methods: An analysis of forensic autopsy investigations was conducted between 2019 and 2022 on a selected urban population in Colombo, Sri Lanka, assessing the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on mortality within these communities. Results: During the COVID-19 restrictions, there was a 2.5-fold increase in the total number of deaths, with a significantly higher percentage of female deaths than before. The majority of these deaths were due to cardiovascular causes, while COVID-19-related deaths ranked third overall. The highest proportion of COVID-19 deaths occurred among unvaccinated females. The monthly frequency of deaths from traffic accidents, poisoning, and asphyxiation decreased, while deaths from blunt trauma, sharp trauma, burns, and immersion increased. There was also a rise in blunt homicides and a greater number of femicides during the COVID-19 restrictions than in the pre-pandemic period. A significantly higher percentage of males who received the COVID-19 vaccine died from cardiovascular causes compared to those in the unvaccinated group. Conclusion: The significant changes in mortality demographics and causes of death within this community during the COVID-19 restrictions underscore the disruption in healthcare, healthseeking behavior, and social interactions during this period. The vulnerability of individuals residing in highly urbanized areas with lower socioeconomic status, particularly women, is brought into sharp focus.
Factors affecting depression and health-related quality of life in the elderly during the COVID-19 pandemic
Deok-Ju Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2023;14(6):520-529.   Published online November 16, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2023.0166
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Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study investigated changes in the health behaviors of the elderly due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), concerns due to COVID-19, depression, and healthrelated quality of life (HRQOL), and aimed to identify factors that affect depression and HRQOL in the elderly. Methods: This study was conducted using data from the 2021 Community Health Survey of the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency. From a total sample size of 229,242 individuals, 74,376 elderly people aged 65 or older were selected as subjects, and changes in health behaviors, concerns due to COVID-19, depression, and HRQOL were measured and analyzed. Results: The level of depression associated with sleep and fatigue was high. The lowest HRQOL was related to physical pain and discomfort, while the most common concerns were related to economic difficulties. Factors influencing depression included worries about infection and economic harm, while factors impacting HRQOL encompassed concerns about infection, economic harm, and criticism from others. Conclusion: If an infectious disease situation such as COVID-19 reoccurs in the future, it will be necessary to encourage participation in hybrid online and offline programs at senior welfare centers. This should also extend to community counseling institutions like mental health welfare centers. Additionally, establishing connections with stable senior job projects can help to mitigate the effects of social interaction restrictions, physical and psychological health issues, and economic difficulties experienced by the elderly.
Short Communications
Perceptions of older adults and generativity among older citizens in Japan: a descriptive cross-sectional study
Yuho Shimizu, Tomoya Takahashi, Kenichiro Sato, Susumu Ogawa, Daisuke Cho, Yoshifumi Takahashi, Daichi Yamashiro, Yan Li, Keigo Hinakura, Ai Iizuka, Tomoki Furuya, Hiroyuki Suzuki
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2023;14(5):427-432.   Published online October 10, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2023.0063
  • 935 View
  • 51 Download
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
As the population ages worldwide, including in Japan, there is a growing expectation for older adults to remain active participants in society. The act of sharing one’s experiences and knowledge with younger generations through social engagement not only enriches the lives of older individuals, but also holds significant value for our society. In this study, we examined both positive and negative perceptions of older adults and investigated the correlation between these perceptions and generativity among older citizens. Additionally, we evaluated the impact of life satisfaction on these factors. Methods: We conducted a survey of 100 older adults in Japan (mean age, 71.68 years) and utilized multiple regression analyses, using positive and negative perceptions of older adults, life satisfaction, and demographic factors as independent variables. The sub-categories of generativity—namely, generative action, concern, and accomplishment—were used as dependent variables. Results: Participants who held a more positive perception of older adults demonstrated a higher level of generative actions and concerns. Additionally, participants who reported higher levels of life satisfaction also exhibited more generative actions, concerns, and accomplishments. Conversely, those who held a more negative perception of older adults were found to have higher levels of generative actions. Conclusion: Enhancing positive perceptions of older adults among them can boost the sub-categories of generativity. This study, which was conducted from an exploratory perspective, has several limitations, including a potential sampling bias. A more comprehensive examination of the relationship between perceptions of older adults and generativity is anticipated in future research.
Epidemiological characteristics of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae outbreaks in the Republic of Korea between 2017 and 2022
Hyoseon Jeong, Junghee Hyun, Yeon-Kyeng Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2023;14(4):312-320.   Published online August 21, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2023.0069
  • 923 View
  • 139 Download
  • 1 Crossref
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
We aimed to describe the epidemiological characteristics of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) outbreaks in healthcare settings in the Republic of Korea between 2017 and 2022.
Methods
Under the national notifiable disease surveillance system, we obtained annual descriptive statistics regarding the isolated species, carbapenemase genotype, healthcare facility type, outbreak location and duration, and number of patients affected and recommended interventions. We used epidemiological investigation reports on CPE outbreaks reported to Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency from June 2017 to September 2022.
Results
Among the 168 reports analyzed, Klebsiella pneumoniae (85.1%) was the most frequently reported species, while K. pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC, 82.7%) was the most common carbapenemase genotype. Both categories increased from 2017 to 2022 (p<0.01). General hospitals had the highest proportion (54.8%), while tertiary general hospitals demonstrated a decreasing trend (p<0.01). The largest proportion of outbreaks occurred exclusively in intensive care units (ICUs, 44.0%), and the frequency of concurrent outbreaks in ICUs and general wards increased over time (p<0.01). The median outbreak duration rose from 43.5 days before the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic (2017–2019) to 79.5 days during the pandemic (2020–2022) (p=0.01), and the median number of patients associated with each outbreak increased from 5.0 to 6.0 (p=0.03). Frequently recommended interventions included employee education (38.1%), and 3 or more measures were proposed for 45.2% of outbreaks.
Conclusion
In the Republic of Korea, CPE outbreaks have been consistently dominated by K. pneumoniae and KPC. The size of these outbreaks increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our findings highlight the need for continuing efforts to control CPE outbreaks using a multimodal approach, while considering their epidemiology.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comparison of clinical outcomes of patients with serial negative surveillance cultures according to a subsequent PCR test for carbapenemase-producing Enterobacterales
    Hyeonji Seo, Seowoo Kim, Yun Woo Lee, Hong Sang Oh, Han-Sung Kim, Yong Kyun Kim
    Journal of Hospital Infection.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
Review Article
Public health agencies’ use of social media for communication during pandemics: a scoping review of the literature
Babatunde Abiodun Balogun, Anne Hogden, Nenagh Kemp, Lin Yang, Maria Agaliotis
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2023;14(4):235-251.   Published online August 9, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2023.0095
  • 1,385 View
  • 141 Download
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Public health agencies (PHAs) have increasingly incorporated social media into their communication mix during successive pandemics in the 21st century. However, the quality, timing, and accuracy of their health messages have varied significantly, resulting in mixed outcomes for communication, audience engagement, and pandemic management. This study aimed to identify factors influencing the effectiveness of pandemic-related health messages shared by PHAs on social media and to report their impact on public engagement as documented in the literature. A scoping literature review was conducted following a predefined protocol. An electronic search of 7 relevant databases and 5 grey literature repositories yielded 9,714 papers published between January 2003 and November 2022. Seventy-three papers were deemed eligible and selected for review. The results underscored the insufficiency of social media guidance policies for PHAs. Six themes were identified: message source, message topic, message style, message timing, content credibility and reliability, and message recipient profile. These themes encompassed 20 variables that could inform PHAs’ social media public health communication during pandemics. Additionally, the findings revealed potential interconnectedness among the variables, and this study concluded by proposing a conceptual model that expands upon existing theoretical foundations for developing and evaluating pandemic-related health messaging.
Review Article
Carbapenem resistance in critically important human pathogens isolated from companion animals: a systematic literature review
Angie Alexandra Rincón-Real, Martha Cecilia Suárez-Alfonso
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(6):407-423.   Published online December 16, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0033
  • 2,708 View
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  • 2 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
This study aimed to describe the presence and geographical distribution of Gram-negativebacteria considered critical on the priority list of antibiotic-resistant pathogens publishedby the World Health Organization, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae,carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp., and carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.A systematic review of original studies published in 5 databases between 2010 and 2021 wasconducted, including genotypically confirmed carbapenem-resistant isolates obtained fromcanines, felines, and their settings. Fifty-one articles met the search criteria. Carbapenemresistant isolates were found in domestic canines and felines, pet food, and on veterinarymedical and household surfaces. The review found that the so-called “big five”—that is, the5 major carbapenemases identified worldwide in Enterobacterales (New Delhi metallo-βlactamase, active-on-imipenem, Verona integron-encoded metallo-β-lactamase, Klebsiellapneumoniae carbapenemase, and oxacillin [OXA]-48-like)—and the 3 most importantcarbapenemases from Acinetobacter spp. (OXA-23-like, OXA-40-like, and OXA-58-like) hadbeen detected in 8 species in the Enterobacteriaceae family and 5 species of glucose nonfermenting bacilli on 5 continents. Two publications used molecular analysis to confirmcarbapenem-resistant bacteria transmission between owners and dogs. Isolating criticallyimportant human carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria from domestic canines andfelines highlights the importance of including these animal species in surveillance programsand antimicrobial resistance containment plans as part of the One Health approach.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The European Union Summary Report on Antimicrobial Resistance in zoonotic and indicator bacteria from humans, animals and food in 2020/2021

    EFSA Journal.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Resistome-based surveillance identifies ESKAPE pathogens as the predominant gram-negative organisms circulating in veterinary hospitals
    Flavia Zendri, Cajsa M. Isgren, Jane Devaney, Vanessa Schmidt, Rachel Rankin, Dorina Timofte
    Frontiers in Microbiology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Unveiling the emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens in exotic pets from France: a comprehensive study (2017-2019)
    Sandro Cardoso, Aurélie Le Loc’h, Inês Marques, Anabela Almeida, Sérgio Sousa, Maria José Saavedra, Sofia Anastácio, Eduarda Silveira
    One Health & Implementation Research.2023; 3(4): 161.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Menstrual hygiene management and its determinants among adolescent girls in low-income urban areas of Delhi, India: a community-based study
Suneela Garg, Nidhi Bhatnagar, Mongjam Meghachandra Singh, Saurav Basu, Amod Borle, Yamini Marimuthu, Falak Azmi, Yomri Dabi, Indu Bala
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(4):273-281.   Published online August 31, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0127
  • 3,125 View
  • 228 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Menstrual hygiene management (MHM) in developing countries is linked to human rights, social justice, and the education and empowerment of young girls. The objective of this study was to assess menstrual hygiene practices and their determinants among adolescent girls, including school dropouts, and the effects of pad distribution programs in urban resettlement areas of Delhi, India.
Methods
A cross-sectional study was conducted from March 2019 to February 2020 in urban resettlement colonies and 2 villages of Delhi among 1,130 adolescent girls aged 10 to 19 years, who were interviewed face to face.
Results
In total, 954 participants (84.4%) used only disposable sanitary pads, 150 (13.3%) used both sanitary pads and cloths, and 26 (2.3%) used only cloths (n=1,130). Most school-going girls utilized the scheme for pad distribution, but only two-thirds of the girls who were out of school utilized the scheme. In the adjusted analysis, girls with lower educational status, those who had dropped out of school, and those from the Muslim religious community were more likely to use cloths for MHM.
Conclusion
More than 4 out of 5 adolescent girls in Delhi in low-income neighborhoods preferred sanitary pads for MHM. The government free pad scheme reached near-universal utilization among school-going girls (97%), but the subsidized pad scheme for girls who did not attend school was insufficiently utilized (75%).

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Menstrual Hygiene Problems and Challenges Faced by Adolescent Females in Rural Areas: A Narrative Review
    Vijiya Kashyap, Sonali G Choudhari
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Perceived difficulties in maintaining menstrual hygiene practices among indigenous adolescents during seasonal water scarcity periods in Bandarban hill district of Bangladesh: A cross-sectional study
    Imdadul Haque Talukdar, M.A. Rifat, Plabon Sarkar, Nobonita Saha, Mesfin Kassaye Tessma, Md. Ibrahim Miah
    International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental.2023; 254: 114268.     CrossRef
  • Menstrual hygiene practices among adolescent women in rural India: a cross-sectional study
    Aditya Singh, Mahashweta Chakrabarty, Shivani Singh, Rakesh Chandra, Sourav Chowdhury, Anshika Singh
    BMC Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Sex differences in factors associated with prediabetes in Korean adults
Jin Suk Ra
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(2):142-152.   Published online April 22, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0053
  • 3,654 View
  • 56 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Identifying the factors associated with prediabetes is necessary for the early detection and management of high-risk individuals with prediabetes. The purpose of this study was to identify the factors associated with prediabetes according to sex in Korean adults. Methods: Using the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2015 to 2019, a total of 13,595 adults (5,565 males and 8,030 females) aged ≥20 years were included in the data analysis. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the factors associated with prediabetes according to sex in Korean adults. Results: In both males and females, age and a family history of type 2 diabetes were associated with prediabetes. In males, current and past smoking habits were associated with increased prediabetes. In addition, low-intensity physical activity and prolonged sedentary behavior were associated with a higher prevalence of prediabetes. Females with a lower education level (less than middle school graduation) showed a higher risk of prediabetes. Conclusion: Sex-specific prevention strategies for prediabetes should be developed. In addition, older individuals and those with a family history of type 2 diabetes should be screened for prediabetes.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The effect of a nutrition program based on the Health Behavior Interaction Model on primary school students’ nutritional attitudes and behaviors
    Ayşe Burcu Başçı, Oya Nuran Emiroğlu, Bilge Kalanlar
    Journal of Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Factors associated with the combination of general and abdominal obesity in middle-aged and older Korean women: a cross-sectional study
    Jin Suk Ra
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2023; 14(5): 379.     CrossRef
Neck circumference and incidence of cerebrovascular disease over 12 years among Korean adults
Jae-Seon Han, Yun-Hee Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(1):71-79.   Published online February 8, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0277
  • 3,027 View
  • 56 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Neck circumference is associated with a distinctive fat storage process that confers additional metabolic risk. Hence, this study aimed to investigate the correlation between baseline neck circumference and the incidence of cerebrovascular disease using a prospective community-based sample of Korean adults over 12 years of follow-up, after controlling for selected covariates. Methods: Participants with non-cerebrovascular disease were divided into 4 groups (Q1–Q4) based on their baseline neck circumference. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to evaluate the relationship between neck circumference and cerebrovascular disease incidence over a 12-year period. Results: Among this study’s 3,662 participants, 128 (3.50%) developed cerebrovascular disease. The incidence of cerebrovascular disease increased from 2.2% in Q1 to 4.3% in Q2, 2.5% in Q3, and 5.0% in Q4. When compared to Q1, the relative risks of cerebrovascular disease development were 0.57 (95% CI, 0.25–1.31), 0.86 (95% CI, 0.38–1.96), and 0.79 (95% CI, 0.30–2.07) in man and 1.86 (95% CI, 0.66–5.20), 3.50 (95% CI, 1.25–9.86), and 4.71 (95% CI, 1.50–14.77) in woman in Q2, Q3, and Q4, respectively, after adjusting for most risk factors related to cerebrovascular disease. Conclusion: The relationship between neck circumference and cerebrovascular disease was stronger in woman than in man, indicating potential differences between the sexes. These results are meaningful for evaluating and surveilling neck circumference as a promising tool for identifying subgroups of vulnerable and at-risk populations.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Neck circumference as a predictor of all-cause mortality in middle-aged and older adults in rural Ecuador
    Oscar H Del Brutto, Denisse A Rumbea, Maitri Patel, Robertino M Mera
    International Health.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The association of Carbohydrate Quality Index with cardiovascular disease risk factors among women with overweight and obesity: A cross-sectional study
    Darya Khosravinia, Farideh Shiraseb, Atieh Mirzababaei, Elnaz Daneshzad, Shahin Jamili, Cain C. T. Clark, Khadijeh Mirzaei
    Frontiers in Nutrition.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Review Articles
Social determinants of adherence to COVID-19 preventive guidelines: a comprehensive review
Zahra Jorjoran Shushtari, Yahya Salimi, Sina Ahmadi, Nader Rajabi-Gilan, Marzieh Shirazikhah, Akbar Biglarian, Ali Almasi, Mohammad Ali Mohammadi Gharehghani
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(6):346-360.   Published online December 21, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0180
  • 6,770 View
  • 153 Download
  • 18 Web of Science
  • 18 Crossref
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Adherence to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) preventive guidelines (ACPG) is an important strategy to control the COVID-19 pandemic effectively. The present study aimed to identify and summarize the social determinants of ACPG among the general population. A comprehensive review was performed from December 2019 to February 2021 through searching electronic databases. Two independent reviewers assessed and selected relevant studies. Next, the characteristics and main findings of the included studies were summarized. Finally, the World Health Organization’s conceptual framework of social determinants of health was used to synthesize the identified social determinants of ACPG. Forty-one of 453 retrieved articles met the inclusion criteria. The study results showed different patterns of ACPG among various communities. Furthermore, 84 social determinants were identified and categorized into structural and intermediary determinants. ACPG is a set of complex behaviors associated with different individual sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics; living and working conditions; COVID-19 knowledge, attitudes, and risk perceptions; exposure to sources and information level; leisure activities; social support; trust; social norms; psychosocial well-being; socio-economic position; and the socio-economic and political context. Interventions to promote ACPG among the general population should consider the identified social determinants of ACPG.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Cognitive predictors of COVID-19 mitigation behaviors in vaccinated and unvaccinated general population members
    Anna Hudson, Peter A. Hall, Sara C. Hitchman, Gang Meng, Geoffrey T. Fong
    Vaccine.2023; 41(27): 4019.     CrossRef
  • Utilisation of rehabilitation due to mental disorders during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic: a difference-in-differences analysis
    Matthias Bethge, David Fauser, Pia Zollmann, Marco Streibelt
    BMC Psychiatry.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Perceptions about COVID-19 preventive measures among Ghanaian women
    Frank Kyei-Arthur, Martin Wiredu Agyekum, Grace Frempong Afrifa-Anane, Reuben Tete Larbi, Peter Kisaakye, Dario Ummarino
    PLOS ONE.2023; 18(4): e0284362.     CrossRef
  • Cognitive and Emotional Motivation to Explain Infection-Prevention Behaviors with Social Support as a Mediator During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Nationwide Cross-Sectional Study in Korea
    Myonghwa Park, Keunyeob Oh, Hyungjun Kim, Xing Fan, Thi-Thanh-Thnh Giap, Rhayun Song
    Patient Preference and Adherence.2023; Volume 17: 1063.     CrossRef
  • Factors Influencing COVID-19 Prevention Behavior: A Community-based Cross-sectional Study
    Ernawaty Ernawaty, Nabilla Belqys Dherindri
    Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences.2023; 11(E): 191.     CrossRef
  • The Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Outcomes in Acute Pancreatitis: A Propensity Score Matched Study Comparing before and during the Pandemic
    Patricia Mihaela Rădulescu, Elena Irina Căluianu, Emil Tiberius Traşcă, Dorin Mercuţ, Ion Georgescu, Eugen Florin Georgescu, Eleonora Daniela Ciupeanu-Călugăru, Maria Filoftea Mercuţ, Răzvan Mercuţ, Vlad Padureanu, Costin Teodor Streba, Cristina Călăraşu,
    Diagnostics.2023; 13(14): 2446.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 in social networks: unravelling its impact on youth risk perception, motivations and protective behaviours during the initial stages of the pandemic
    Marta Anson, Ksenia Eritsyan
    International Journal of Adolescence and Youth.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Bi-directional associations between mask usage and beliefs about reasons for masking before and after the downgrading of the legal status of COVID-19 in Japan: A longitudinal study
    Michio Murakami
    International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction.2023; 97: 104072.     CrossRef
  • Geoepidemiological perspective on COVID-19 pandemic review, an insight into the global impact
    Alexandre Vallée
    Frontiers in Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Effect of COVID-19 Pandemic on Using CTS and MRI in Iran: Evidence from an Interrupted Time Series Analysis
    Monireh Mahmood Pour-Azari, Nasim Badiee, Ali Kazemi Karyani, Shahin Soltani, Satar Rezaei
    Journal of Health Reports and Technology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association between social isolation and loneliness with COVID-19 vaccine uptake in Japan: a nationwide cross-sectional internet survey
    Tomohiko Ukai, Takahiro Tabuchi
    BMJ Open.2023; 13(11): e073008.     CrossRef
  • Exploration of factors associated with mask-wearing and hand disinfection in Japan after the coronavirus disease outbreak: A longitudinal study
    Michio Murakami, Mei Yamagata, Asako Miura
    International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction.2023; 98: 104107.     CrossRef
  • Social Determinants of Adherence to COVID-19 Preventive Guidelines in Iran: A Qualitative Study
    Sina Ahmadi, Zahra Jorjoran Shushtari, Marzieh Shirazikhah, Akbar Biglarian, Seyed Fahim Irandoost, Toktam Paykani, Ali Almasi, Nader Rajabi-Gilan, Nafiul Mehedi, Yahya Salimi
    INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, .2022; 59: 004695802210841.     CrossRef
  • Determinants of observing health protocols related to preventing COVID-19 in adult women: A qualitative study in Iran
    Javad Yoosefi Lebni, Saeede Pavee, Mandana Saki, Arash Ziapour, Ahmad Ahmadi, Mehdi Khezeli
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Adherence to Coronavirus Disease 2019 Preventive Measures in a Representative Sample of the Population of the Canton of Vaud, Switzerland
    Audrey Butty, Nolwenn Bühler, Jérôme Pasquier, Julien Dupraz, Vincent Faivre, Sandrine Estoppey, Cloé Rawlinson, Semira Gonseth Nusslé, Murielle Bochud, Valérie D’Acremont
    International Journal of Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Quarantine preparedness – the missing factor in COVID-19 behaviour change? Qualitative insights from Australia
    Angela Davis, Stephanie Munari, Joseph Doyle, Brett Sutton, Allen Cheng, Margaret Hellard, Lisa Gibbs
    BMC Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The impact of COVID-19 pandemic on hospital admissions for nine diseases in Iran: insight from an interrupted time series analysis
    Sina Ahmadi, Ali Kazemi-Karyani, Nasim Badiee, Sarah Byford, Ali Mohammadi, Bakhtiar Piroozi, Satar Rezaei
    Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Wei Liang, Yanping Duan, Feifei Li, Ryan E Rhodes, Xiang Wang, Dehiwala Liyanage Ishanka Harshani Kusum Peiris, Lin Zhou, Borui Shang, Yide Yang, Julien S Baker, Jiao Jiao, Wei Han
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COVID-19 prediction models: a systematic literature review
Sheikh Muzaffar Shakeel, Nithya Sathya Kumar, Pranita Pandurang Madalli, Rashmi Srinivasaiah, Devappa Renuka Swamy
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(4):215-229.   Published online August 13, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0100
  • 7,437 View
  • 167 Download
  • 14 Web of Science
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
As the world grapples with the problem of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and its devastating effects, scientific groups are working towards solutions to mitigate the effects of the virus. This paper aimed to collate information on COVID-19 prediction models. A systematic literature review is reported, based on a manual search of 1,196 papers published from January to December 2020. Various databases such as Google Scholar, Web of Science, and Scopus were searched. The search strategy was formulated and refined in terms of subject keywords, geographical purview, and time period according to a predefined protocol. Visualizations were created to present the data trends according to different parameters. The results of this systematic literature review show that the study findings are critically relevant for both healthcare managers and prediction model developers. Healthcare managers can choose the best prediction model output for their organization or process management. Meanwhile, prediction model developers and managers can identify the lacunae in their models and improve their data-driven approaches.

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  • Vaccination compartmental epidemiological models for the delta and omicron SARS-CoV-2 variants
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  • The reporting completeness and transparency of systematic reviews of prognostic prediction models for COVID-19 was poor: a methodological overview of systematic reviews
    Persefoni Talimtzi, Antonios Ntolkeras, Georgios Kostopoulos, Konstantinos I. Bougioukas, Eirini Pagkalidou, Andreas Ouranidis, Athanasia Pataka, Anna-Bettina Haidich
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    Berik Koichubekov, Aliya Takuadina, Ilya Korshukov, Anar Turmukhambetova, Marina Sorokina
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    Daniel Peck, Andrea Beaton, Maria Carmo Nunes, Nicholas Ollberding, Allison Hays, Pranoti Hiremath, Federico Asch, Nitin Malik, Christopher Fung, Craig Sable, Bruno Nascimento
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Scrutiny of COVID-19 response strategies among severely affected European nations
Shine Stephen, Alwin Issac, Rakesh Vadakkethil Radhakrishnan, Jaison Jacob, VR Vijay, Sam Jose, SM Azhar, Anoop S. Nair, Nadiya Krishnan, Rakesh Sharma, Manju Dhandapani
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(4):203-214.   Published online July 29, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0068
  • 9,940 View
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Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Although the health care systems in Europe are considered the global benchmark, European nations were severely affected by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. This manuscript aimed to examine the strategies implemented to combat the COVID-19 pandemic by France, the United Kingdom, Spain, Italy, Germany, and Russia and their outcomes in terms of the number of cases, testing, and deaths. This is the first review of its kind that extensively analyzes the preparedness, mitigation, and response strategies against the COVID-19 pandemic adopted by these nations. This paper further suggests a strategic preparedness model for future pandemics. From the analysis, we found that a decentralized approach, prompt decision-making and timely execution, coordination between local health authorities, and public participation in the implementation of strategies could substantially reduce the case fatality rate. Nations with a high percentage of gross domestic product invested in the health sector, as well as more nurses, physicians, hospital beds, intensive care unit beds, and ventilators, better managed the pandemic. Instead, nations that postponed their pandemic response by delaying tracking, tracing, testing, quarantine, and lockdown were badly affected. The lessons learned from the present pandemic could be used as a guide to prepare for further pandemics.

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Original Article
Perceptions of the COVID-19 vaccine and willingness to receive vaccination among health workers in Nigeria
Oluseyi Ademola Adejumo, Olorunfemi Akinbode Ogundele, Cynthia Roli Madubuko, Rosena Olubanke Oluwafemi, Ogochukwu Chinedum Okoye, Kenechukwu Chukwuemeka Okonkwo, Sunday Samson Owolade, Oladimeji Adedeji Junaid, Olutoyin Morenike Lawal, Adenike Christianah Enikuomehin, Maureen Iru Ntaji, Aisha Sokunbi, Aina Omodele Timothy, Olatunji Sunday Abolarin, Emmanuel Olalekan Ali, John Oghenevwirhe Ohaju-Obodo
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(4):236-243.   Published online July 19, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0023
  • 11,036 View
  • 453 Download
  • 35 Web of Science
  • 34 Crossref
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The study aimed to examine health workers’ perceptions of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine in Nigeria and their willingness to receive the vaccine when it becomes available.
Methods
This multi-center cross-sectional study used non-probability convenience sampling to enroll 1,470 hospital workers aged 18 and above from 4 specialized hospitals. A structured and validated self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Data entry and analysis were conducted using IBM SPSS ver. 22.0.
Results
The mean age of respondents was 40±6 years. Only 53.5% of the health workers had positive perceptions of the COVID-19 vaccine, and only slightly more than half (55.5%) were willing to receive vaccination. Predictors of willingness to receive the COVID-19 vaccine included having a positive perception of the vaccine (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 4.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.50−5.69), perceiving a risk of contracting COVID-19 (AOR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.25–3.98), having received tertiary education (AOR, 3.50; 95% CI, 1.40−6.86), and being a clinical health worker (AOR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.01−1.68).
Conclusion
Perceptions of the COVID-19 vaccine and willingness to receive the vaccine were sub-optimal among this group. Educational interventions to improve health workers' perceptions and attitudes toward the COVID-19 vaccine are needed.

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PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives