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Original Articles
Behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy for relapse prevention in abstinent smokers: a rapid review and meta-analysis for the Korea Preventive Service Task Force
Naae Lee, Eon Sook Lee, Jae Moon Yun, Cheol Min Lee, Seung-Won Oh, Younglee Choi, Belong Cho
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(4):244-253.   Published online July 6, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0017
  • 3,899 View
  • 84 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of relapse prevention interventions involving behavioral and pharmacological treatment among abstinent smokers.
Methods
This rapid review was conducted using MEDLINE, Cochrane CENTRAL, CINAHL, Embase, KMbase, and KoreaMed to identify studies published until June 20, 2020. The participants were abstinent smokers who quit smoking on their own, due to pregnancy, hospitalization, or by participating in a smoking cessation program. We found a systematic review that fit the objective of this study and included 81 randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Studies that did not present information on smoking cessation status, had no control group, or used reward-based interventions were excluded. Random effect and fixed effect meta-analyses were used to estimate the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). In subgroup analyses, differences between subgroups were verified based on the participant setting, characteristics, intervention type, and intensity.
Results
Following screening, 44 RCTs were included in the meta-analysis. The review reported no differences in the success rate of relapse prevention between the behavioral interventions. Pharmacotherapy interventions showed higher success rates (RR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.05−1.26; I2=40.71%), depending on prior abstinence duration and the drug type. Conclusions: The results indicated that pharmacotherapy has a significant effect on preventing relapse among abstinent smokers.
Behavioral interventions for smoking cessation among adolescents: a rapid review and meta-analysis for the Korea Preventive Services Task Force
Younglee Choi, Cheol Min Lee, Belong Cho, Eon Sook Lee, Seung-Won Oh, Naae Lee, Jae Moon Yun
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(3):177-186.   Published online June 2, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0018
  • 6,797 View
  • 127 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of behavioral smoking cessation interventions among adolescents.
Methods
MEDLINE, CENTRAL, Embase, CINAHL, KoreaMed, and KMbase were searched from inception to June 2020. Systematic reviews (SRs) or meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were initially searched to perform a rapid SR. After selecting the final SR, RCTs after the publication year of the selected SR were searched. The primary outcome was smoking status after at least 6 months of follow-up, and the secondary outcome was smoking status at 4 weeks. Two reviewers independently assessed the selected studies’ quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. The meta-analysis utilized a Mantel-Haenszel fixed-effect model reporting the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). The subgroup analysis utilized Cochrane’s Q.
Results
Thirty-two RCTs (11,637 participants) from a single SR were meta-analyzed. After 6 months of follow-up, the intervention group had significantly higher abstinence rates (RR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.20−1.41; I2=26.46%). At 4 weeks of follow-up, the intervention group also had significantly higher abstinence rates (RR, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.49–2.47; I2=0.00%). The subgroup analysis indicated a significant difference in the abstinence rate according to the study setting and the period between intervention completion and follow-up.
Conclusion
This review showed that adolescent behavioral smoking cessation intervention programs significantly increased abstinence rates compared to the usual care.

Citations

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  • Behavioral Interventions for Smoking Cessation in Adolescents: Korea Preventive Services Task Force Guidance
    Younglee Choi, Cheol Min Lee, Jae Moon Yun, Eon Sook Lee, Seung-Won Oh, Naae Lee, Belong Cho
    Journal of the Korean Society for Research on Nico.2021; 12(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Tobacco Control Policy in Period of Epidemic “COVID 19”
    Eon Sook Lee
    Journal of the Korean Society for Research on Nico.2021; 12(1): 34.     CrossRef
Secondhand Smoking Among Children in Rural Households: A Community Based Cross-Sectional Study in Bangladesh
Rishad Choudhury Robin, Narongsak Noosorn, Sheikh Mohammad Alif
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(4):201-208.   Published online August 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.4.09
  • 5,327 View
  • 76 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study aimed to determine the factors associated with reducing exposure to secondhand smoke among children in households of rural Bangladesh.

Methods

A cross-sectional study of 410 smokers and non-smokers, in 6 villages of Munshigonj district was conducted. Data were collected randomly using a self-administrative questionnaire. Differences between variables were assessed using Chi-square or Fisher’s exact test (as appropriate). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to investigate associations. All results were presented as unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios with a 95% confidence interval. The level of statistical significance was reached when p < 0.05.

Results

A smoker in the household was determined to be a risk factor associated with exposure of other household members to secondhand smoke (p < 0.001). Higher education, strict implementation of household smoke-free rules, a higher influence of social norms and culture, as well as moderate knowledge on exposure to secondhand smoke were considered as preventive factors associated with exposure of others in the home to secondhand smoke.

Conclusion

Exposure to secondhand smoke is an extensive and preventable risk factor for children, and reducing exposure to secondhand smoke will have a largely positive effect in the community. An effective public health intervention model may reduce secondhand smoking.

Citations

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  • Need for sensitization on serious threats of second-hand smoke: Findings from a national study in Mauritius, a small island developing state in the Indian Ocean
    Marie Chan Sun, Urmila D. Beeharry Panray, Jayrani Cheeneebash, Raj Gunesh
    Preventive Medicine Reports.2022; 25: 101667.     CrossRef
  • Muslim Communities Learning About Second-hand Smoke in Bangladesh (MCLASS II): a combined evidence and theory-based plus partnership intervention development approach
    Ian Kellar, Zunayed Al Azdi, Cath Jackson, Rumana Huque, Noreen Dadirai Mdege, Kamran Siddiqi
    Pilot and Feasibility Studies.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Second Hand Smoke Exposure among Children in Indian Homes: Findings from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey
    Jaya Prasad Tripathy
    Behavioral Medicine.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Social measures for reducing exposure to secondhand smoke in migrant workers of sugarcane harvest in the lower northern region of Thailand
    Narongsak Noosorn, Anukool Manoton, Rishad Choudhury Robin
    Tobacco Induced Diseases.2021; 19(September): 1.     CrossRef
Interaction Between Smoking Cigarettes and Alcohol Consumption on Sexual Experience in High School Students
Soo Jeong Kim, Kyoung Won Cho
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(5):274-280.   Published online October 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.5.03
  • 6,705 View
  • 47 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study aimed to analyze nationwide representative data from the 11th Korean Youth Health Risk Behavior Web-Based Survey to determine whether factors including socio-demographics, smoking and alcohol consumption, were factors related to high school students that had experienced sexual intercourse.

Methods

A total of 33,744 students (17,346 boys and 16,398 girls) in 1st, 2nd, and 3rd grade at high school were analyzed. SPSS complex samples methods were used for analyses. Socio-demographic and health risk behaviors (type of region of residence, family structure, and economic status, student academic achievement, gender, high school grade, pocket money, student smoking, alcohol consumption, and having engaged in sexual intercourse) were considered as independent variables.

Results

There were 3.6% of girls and 9.9% of boys in high school that were sexually active. This behavior and the average number of cigarettes smoked daily, and alcohol consumed weekly, represented a dose-response relationship, after considering confounding factors. Compared with students that did not smoke or consume alcohol, smoking 1–9 cigarettes per day and consuming 1–6 cups of alcohol and group “smoking more than 10 cigarettes per day and consuming more than 7 cups of alcohol, had a 5.94 and 22.25 higher risk of having had sexual intercourse, respectively.

Conclusion

Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption were associated with an increased likelihood of high school students engaging in sexual intercourse.

Citations

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  • Factors associated with adolescents’ sexual experience based on the biopsychosocial model: a cross-sectional study using the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey (KYRBS)
    Ka Young Kim, Hye Young Shin
    BMJ Open.2022; 12(11): e066307.     CrossRef
  • DETERMINANTS OF PREMARITAL SEXUAL BEHAVIOR AMONGST ADOLESCENTS IN INDONESIA
    Nadhirul Mundhiro, Ridhwan Fauzi, Mohammad Ainul Maruf, Nurfadhilah Nurfadhilah
    Jurnal Biometrika dan Kependudukan.2021; 10(1): 86.     CrossRef
Gender Differences in Harmful Use of Alcohol Among Korean Adults
Eunok Park, Yeon Sook Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(4):205-214.   Published online August 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.4.02
  • 3,470 View
  • 54 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Harmful alcohol consumption is associated with considerable social and economic damage to individuals and society. Because gender and ethnic background influence alcohol intake differently, examining gender specific factors influencing harmful drinking is necessary. This study investigated gender differences in alcohol consumption, harmful drinking, and the associated factors among Korean adults.

Methods

We analyzed the data from the 2012–2015 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Data from survey participants aged 20–64 years (N = 18,581) were included. The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test was used for alcohol dependence, and pooled weights were used. Chi-squared tests and multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted.

Results

The prevalence of harmful alcohol use (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test score ≥ 16) was 10.7% in the total sample; 18.4% in men and 3.4% in women, which constituted a significant difference. Education, marital status, smoking, perceived stress, and depressive feeling were associated with harmful drinking in both genders. However, household income, occupation, and perceived health status were associated with harmful drinking only in men.

Conclusion

Since there are gender differences in harmful drinking and alcohol dependence, gender tailored prevention and intervention strategies for alcohol dependence are necessary including consideration of smoking, stress, and depressive feeling.

Citations

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  • Characteristics and Clinical Course of Diabetes of the Exocrine Pancreas: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study
    Nami Lee, So Jeong Park, Dongwoo Kang, Ja Young Jeon, Hae Jin Kim, Dae Jung Kim, Kwan-Woo Lee, Edward J. Boyko, Seung Jin Han
    Diabetes Care.2022; 45(5): 1141.     CrossRef
  • Harmful alcohol use among mothers of under-five child: findings from the Panel Study on Korean Children
    Seulgi Kim, Seung-Ah Choe, Sung-Il Cho
    BMC Women's Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Associations between Harmful Experiences from Alcohol Use of Others and Mental Health in Korean Adolescents
    Mi Ah Han
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2019; 16(21): 4240.     CrossRef
Nutritional Status of Indonesian Children in Low-Income Households with Fathers that Smoke
Maria Wijaya-Erhardt
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(2):64-71.   Published online April 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.2.04
  • 19,562 View
  • 187 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study compared the nutritional status of children in low-income households in Indonesia whose fathers were either cigarette smokers or non-smokers.

Methods

A cross sectional study of 482 children aged 2–6 years was conducted, stratified by whether the fathers were non-smoking (n = 138) or smoking (n = 340). Mothers and smoking fathers were interviewed about socioeconomic status and cigarette expenditure, respectively. The nutritional status of children was defined by weight-for-age, height-for-age and weight-for-height.

Results

Both groups had similar income. Households with a father that smoked, spent 16.6% of their income on cigarettes. Children whose fathers did not smoke had higher height-for-age (−1.99 vs. −2.25 Z-score, p = 0.02) than children whose fathers smoked. Weight-for-age in children with fathers that did not smoke was greater (−1.49 vs. −1.64 Z-score) but not statistically significantly different to those children with fathers that smoked, nor was child weight-for-height (−0.46 vs. −0.45 Z-score). The prevalence of stunted growth was higher in the children with a father that smoked compared with those that had a father did not smoke (62.2 vs. 49.6%, p = 0.07, respectively). There were 28.3% of children underweight in homes where the fathers did not smoke, and 35.6% in households where the father smoked (p = 0.11). Wasting was observed in 4.4% children where fathers did not smoke and 4.7% where fathers did smoke.

Conclusion

With similar income constraints, the degree of height growth faltering was less in children whose fathers did not smoke, compared to those whose fathers did smoke.

Citations

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  • Developmental trajectories of body mass index since childhood and health-related quality of life in young adulthood: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study
    Parnian Parvin, Parisa Amiri, Mohammad Masih Mansouri-Tehrani, Leila Cheraghi, Amirali Zareie Shab-khaneh, Fereidoun Azizi
    Quality of Life Research.2022; 31(7): 2093.     CrossRef
  • Do parental Smoking Behaviors Affect Children's Thinness, Stunting, and Overweight Status in Indonesia? Evidence from a Large-Scale Longitudinal Survey
    Adrianna Bella, Teguh Dartanto, Dimitri Swasthika Nurshadrina, Gita Kusnadi, Faizal Rahmanto Moeis, Renny Nurhasana, Aryana Satrya, Hasbullah Thabrany
    Journal of Family and Economic Issues.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Cigarette smoke exposure and increased risks of stunting among under-five children
    Dyah Dwi Astuti, Tri Widyastuti Handayani, Duwi Pudji Astuti
    Clinical Epidemiology and Global Health.2020; 8(3): 943.     CrossRef
  • The association between secondhand smoke exposure and growth outcomes of children: A systematic literature review
    Siti Nadhiroh, Kusharisupeni Djokosujono, Diah Mulyawati Utari
    Tobacco Induced Diseases.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Factors Affecting Smoking Cessation Success of Heavy Smokers Registered in the Intensive Care Smoking Cessation Camp (Data from the National Tobacco Control Center)
Hansol Yeom, Hee-Sook Lim, Jihyun Min, Seoni Lee, Yoon-Hyung Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2018;9(5):240-247.   Published online October 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2018.9.5.05
  • 6,645 View
  • 119 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors involved in the success of smoking cessation in heavy smokers enrolled in an intensive care smoking cessation camp program.

Methods

Heavy smokers enrolled in the program were classified into a success (n = 69) or failure (n = 29) group, according to whether they maintained smoking cessation for 6 months after the end of the program. Demographics, smoking behaviors, and smoking cessation-related characteristics were analyzed.

Results

Statistically significantly more participants in the success group had a spouse (98.6%; p = 0.008) compared with participants in the failure group (82.8%). However, multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that having a spouse was not an independent factor in smoking cessation (p = 0.349). A significant difference in the frequency of counseling between the success and failure groups was observed (p = 0.001), with 72.5% of those who received counseling on 3–5 occasions for 6 months after the end of program successfully quit smoking, indicating that those who received more counseling had a higher likelihood of smoking cessation success. This was confirmed as an independent factor by multivariate logistic regression (p < 0.005). Furthermore, a graduate school level of education or higher, indicated a statistically greater success rate compared to those that were less well educated (p = 0.043). This was also observed as a significant independent factor using multivariate logistic regression (p = 0.046).

Conclusion

Education level, marital status, and the number of counseling sessions were significant factors contributing to smoking cessation success.

Citations

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  • Sigara Bırakma Polikliniğine Başvuran Bireylerde Tedavi Başarısını Etkileyen Faktörler
    Derya KOCAKAYA, Hatice ŞENOL, Sezer ASLAN, Ahmed Mahmud ÇIRAKOĞLU, Merve ÇAKIR, Hatice TELCİ, Mehmet ÇETİNKAYA, Sehnaz OLGUN, Ayşe Nilüfer ÖZAYDIN, Ceyhan BERRİN
    Bağımlılık Dergisi.2022; 23(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Smoking cessation rates in elderly and nonelderly smokers after participating in an intensive care smoking cessation camp
    Jae-Kyeong Lee, Yu-Il Kim, Sun-Seog Kweon, In-Jae Oh, Yong-Soo Kwon, Hong-Joon Shin, Yu-Ri Choe, Ha-Young Park, Young-Ok Na, Hwa-Kyung Park
    Medicine.2022; 101(30): e29886.     CrossRef
  • Patterns and predictors of smoking relapse among inpatient smoking intervention participants: a 1-year follow-up study in Korea
    Seung Eun Lee, Chul-Woung Kim, Hyo-Bin Im, Myungwha Jang
    Epidemiology and Health.2021; 43: e2021043.     CrossRef
  • Factors affecting smoking initiation and cessation among adult smokers in Fiji: A qualitative study
    Masoud Mohammadnezhad, Mondha Kengganpanich
    Tobacco Induced Diseases.2021; 19(December): 1.     CrossRef
  • “STOP the PUFF! Tayo’y mag bagong BAGA, SIGARILYO ay ITIGIL”: A Pilot Community-based Tobacco Intervention Project in an Urban Settlement
    Irene Salve D Joson-Vergara, Julie T Li-Yu
    Journal of Medicine, University of Santo Tomas.2021; 5(1): 586.     CrossRef
  • Smoking cessation correlates with a decrease in infection rates following total joint arthroplasty
    Christina Herrero, Alex Tang, Amy Wasterlain, Scott Sherman, Joseph Bosco, Claudette Lajam, Ran Schwarzkopf, James Slover
    Journal of Orthopaedics.2020; 21: 390.     CrossRef
Letter
Smoking Status on Bone Health and Osteoporosis Prevalence
Vu H. Nguyen
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2018;9(4):213-214.   Published online August 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2018.9.4.11
  • 65,535 View
  • 60 Download
  • 2 Citations
PDF

Citations

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  • Validation Of Diagnostic Efficiency Of Digital Panoramic Radiographs In Predicting Osteoporosis By Female Undergraduate Students
    Cristalle Soman, Noura Aldakheel, Layal Aldughishem, Rahaf Alogaily, Mashail Aljuhani, Sara Aljumaiah
    Annals of Dental Specialty.2021; 9(2): 39.     CrossRef
  • Association of dental implants success in bone density classification of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis - a clinical and radiographic prospective study
    Wasim Alsadi, Ali AbouSulaiman, MohammadMonzer AlSabbagh
    Journal of Indian Academy of Oral Medicine and Rad.2021; 33(4): 428.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Effects of Smoking Cessation Intervention Education Program Based on Blended Learning among Nursing Students in South Korea
Sook-Hee Choi, Yun-Hee Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2018;9(4):185-191.   Published online August 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2018.9.4.07
  • 5,368 View
  • 135 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study was conducted to evaluate whether a “smoking cessation intervention” education program based on blended learning, was effective in improving nursing students’ perceived competence and motivation to perform a smoking cessation intervention for smokers.

Methods

A quasi-experimental, pretest–posttest design was conducted. The smoking cessation intervention education program based on blended learning, was administered to the experimental group (n = 23) in 5 sessions, consisting of 2 courses of an e-learning program and 1 course of a face-to-face learning program per session. The control group (n = 21) received the opportunity to participate in an e-learning program as well as receiving material of a face-to-face learning program, after completion of the smoking cessation intervention education program.

Results

The experimental group showed significant differences in autonomous motivation (t = −6.982, p < 0.001), controlled motivation (t = −3.729, p = 0.001), and perceived competence compared to the control group (t = −3.801, p < 0.001).

Conclusion

This study showed that a smoking cessation intervention education program adopting blended learning, was significantly effective in enhancing nursing students’ autonomous motivation and perceived competence to conduct a smoking cessation intervention. Further studies are needed to confirm longitudinal effects of this program.

Citations

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  • Efficacy of a blended learning programme in enhancing the communication skill competence and self-efficacy of nursing students in conducting clinical handovers: a randomised controlled trial
    Jessie Yuk Seng Chung, William Ho Cheung Li, Ankie Tan Cheung, Laurie Long Kwan Ho, Joyce Oi Kwan Chung
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of flipped learning-based smoking cessation intervention education program for nursing students in South Korea
    Yein Lee, Yunhee Kim
    The Journal of Korean Academic Society of Nursing .2022; 28(2): 147.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of Diabetes Nursing Course Designed With Hybrid Learning Pedagogy: A Pilot Study
    Gülten OKUROĞLU, Şule ALPAR ECEVİT
    Clinical and Experimental Health Sciences.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Impact of tobacco cessation education on behaviors of nursing undergraduates in helping smoker to quit smoking
    Li Zhang, Xian Huang, Tao Luo, Li Jiang, Mei Jiang, Han Chen
    Tobacco Induced Diseases.2021; 19(July): 1.     CrossRef
  • Blended learning in undergraduate nursing education – A scoping review
    Don M. Leidl, Lauren Ritchie, Neda Moslemi
    Nurse Education Today.2020; 86: 104318.     CrossRef
  • Comparing student achievement in traditional learning with a combination of blended and flipped learning
    Suhaila Halasa, Nimer Abusalim, Mohammad Rayyan, Rose E. Constantino, Omayah Nassar, Huda Amre, Moayad Sharab, Insirah Qadri
    Nursing Open.2020; 7(4): 1129.     CrossRef
Study on Cardiopulmonary Function, Maximal Oxygen Uptake, and Obesity Index according to Smoking Status in Middle-Aged and Older Office Workers
Deok-Ju Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2018;9(3):95-100.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2018.9.3.02
  • 3,944 View
  • 107 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

To investigate the effect of smoking upon cardiopulmonary function, maximal oxygen uptake, and obesity index, in middle-aged and older workers to propose guidelines on healthcare for these age groups.

Methods

This study analyzed medical data from 2,753 white-collar workers aged 50 years or older from workplaces located in Seoul, South Korea. Blood pressure (BP), resting heart rate, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), and body mass index (BMI) of each subject were measured. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS 21.0.

Results

In the smoking group BP and resting heart rate were significantly higher than in the non-smoking and smoking-cessation groups (p < 0.05). In addition, VO2max was lower in the smoking group compared to the other 2 groups. BP closely correlated with resting heart rate, abdominal fat ratio, and BMI. BMI was the highest in the group that stopped smoking and, BMI and abdominal fat ratio negatively correlated with VO2max.

Conclusion

Smoking increases the risk of cardiopulmonary disease but obesity may be caused by stopping smoking. Therefore, healthcare guidelines on smoking cessation should also include nutritional advice.

Citations

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  • Smoking Status on Bone Health and Osteoporosis Prevalence
    Vu H. Nguyen
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2018; 9(4): 213.     CrossRef
Effects of Anti-Smoking Public Service Announcements on the Attitudes of Korean College Students toward Smoking
Kyoung Won Cho, Jakyoung Lee, Ji-hye Ryu, Soo Jeong Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(6):397-404.   Published online December 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.6.07
  • 3,077 View
  • 40 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives

This study aimed to identify the effects of anti-smoking public service announcements on the attitudes of Korean college students toward smoking.

Methods

This study involved students via convenience sampling from seven universities who were randomly assigned to four groups. All groups completed a preliminary questionnaire, before being shown a public service announcement twice, and then completed a post viewing questionnaire.

Results

For announcements with positive messages, the proportion of changes in beliefs and attitudes were 39.1% and 19.8%, respectively, whereas those with negative messages showed a greater proportion of changes in the beliefs (59.7%) and attitudes (40.3%). After adjusting for sex and change in belief, the message types and smoking status were identified as factors affecting the change in the participants attitudes. A negative message resulted in a greater change in attitudes (odds ratio [OR], 3.047; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.847–5.053). Ever-smokers including current smokers showed a greater positive change in attitude than never-smokers (OR, 6.965; 95% CI, 4.107–11.812).

Conclusion

This study found that positive anti-smoking public service announcements were more effective on attitude change than negative messages. Additionally these announcements were more effective among viewers who were current smokers or had a prior smoking experience.

Citations

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  • Encouraging Firework Safety Through Public Service Announcements
    Stefano Cardin, Rachel Faber, Daniel Miller, Mary Elizabeth Gibson, Brett Lewellyn
    The Journal of Hand Surgery.2022; 47(6): 574.     CrossRef
  • Maintenance of Tobacco Abstinence—Effect of Anti-Tobacco Propaganda (Media) Messages
    Laxmi Kumari, Meenakshi Sood, Sandhya Gupta
    Pertanika Journal of Social Sciences and Humanitie.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association between Community Violence, Disorder and School Environment with Bullying among School Adolescents in Sao Paulo – Brazil
    Catarina Machado Azeredo, Emanuele Souza Marques, Letícia Martins Okada, Maria Fernanda Tourinho Peres
    Journal of Interpersonal Violence.2022; : 088626052211012.     CrossRef
  • Interaction Between Smoking Cigarettes and Alcohol Consumption on Sexual Experience in High School Students
    Soo Jeong Kim, Kyoung Won Cho
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2019; 10(5): 274.     CrossRef
Causal Effect of Self-esteem on Cigarette Smoking Stages in Adolescents: Coarsened Exact Matching in a Longitudinal Study
Ahmad Khosravi, Asghar Mohammadpoorasl, Kourosh Holakouie-Naieni, Mahmood Mahmoodi, Ali Akbar Pouyan, Mohammad Ali Mansournia
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(6):341-345.   Published online December 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2016.10.003
  • 2,076 View
  • 30 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Identification of the causal impact of self-esteem on smoking stages faces seemingly insurmountable problems in observational data, where self-esteem is not manipulable by the researcher and cannot be assigned randomly. The aim of this study was to find out if weaker self-esteem in adolescence is a risk factor of cigarette smoking in a longitudinal study in Iran.
Methods
In this longitudinal study, 4,853 students (14–18 years) completed a self-administered multiple-choice anonym questionnaire. The students were evaluated twice, 12 months apart. Students were matched based on coarsened exact matching on pretreatment variables, including age, gender, smoking stages at the first wave of study, socioeconomic status, general risk-taking behavior, having a smoker in the family, having a smoker friend, attitude toward smoking, and self-injury, to ensure statistically equivalent comparison groups. Self-esteem was measured using the Rosenberg 10-item questionnaire and were classified using a latent class analysis. After matching, the effect of self-esteem was evaluated using a multinomial logistic model.
Results
In the causal fitted model, for adolescents with weaker self-esteem relative to those with stronger self-esteem, the relative risk for experimenters and regular smokers relative to nonsmokers would be expected to increase by a factor of 2.2 (1.9–2.6) and 2.0 (1.5–2.6), respectively.
Conclusion
Using a causal approach, our study indicates that low self-esteem is consistently associated with progression in cigarette smoking stages.

Citations

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  • The effect of the educational intervention on empowerment of male high school students in prevention of smoking
    Ali Khani Jeihooni, Amirhossein Mobaraei, Amin Kiani, Pooyan Afzali Harsini, Sajjad Karami Ghazi Khani
    Journal of Substance Use.2022; 27(2): 162.     CrossRef
  • “I am a little superhero!”: a pilot play-based group to enhance self-esteem of children from low-income families in Hong Kong
    Jessie Ming Sin Wong
    Social Work with Groups.2021; 44(2): 181.     CrossRef
  • Depressive Symptoms and Cigarette Smoking in Adolescents and Young Adults: Mediating Role of Friends Smoking
    Christian W Mendo, Marine Maurel, Isabelle Doré, Jennifer O’Loughlin, Marie-Pierre Sylvestre
    Nicotine & Tobacco Research.2021; 23(10): 1771.     CrossRef
  • Explaining the determinants of hookah smoking cessation among southern Iranian women: a qualitative study
    Sakineh Dadipoor, Gerjo Kok, Ali Heyrani, Teamur Aghamolaei, Mohtasham Ghaffari, Amin Ghanbarnezhad
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    Ali Khani Jeihooni, Zahra Khiyali, Seyyed Mansour Kashfi, Seyyed Hannan Kashfi, Mohammad Zakeri, Mehdi Amirkhani
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High Tobacco Use among Presumptive Tuberculosis Patients, South India: Time to Integrate Control of Two Epidemics
Kunal Pradip Kanakia, Marie Gilbert Majella, Pruthu Thekkur, Gomathi Ramaswamy, Divya Nair, Palanivel Chinnakali
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(4):228-232.   Published online August 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2016.06.001
  • 1,990 View
  • 21 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Tobacco is an important risk factor for tuberculosis (TB) infection and TB disease. Identifying tobacco users and providing tobacco cessation services is expected to reduce the burden of TB. We assessed tobacco use among presumptive TB patients attending a tertiary hospital and their willingness to attend tobacco cessation services.
Methods
A cross-sectional study was conducted among presumptive TB patients attending a designated microscopy center of a tertiary hospital in South India. All presumptive TB patients aged ≥ 18 years attending the designated microscopy center were interviewed using a semistructured interview schedule. Data on presumptive TB patient's age, sex, tobacco use and forms of tobacco, attempts to quit tobacco since 1 year, and willingness to attend a smoking cessation clinic in tertiary hospital were captured. History of use of tobacco in the past 1 month was considered as “tobacco use.”.
Results
A total of 424 presumptive TB patients aged ≥ 18 years were interviewed. Tobacco use in the past 1 month was reported by 176 (41.5%, 95% confidence interval: 36.9–46.3%) presumptive TB patients. In total, 78 (18%) presumptive TB patients were eventually diagnosed with smear-positive pulmonary TB, of them 63 (80%) were tobacco users. Presumptive TB patients aged ≥ 30 years, male sex, and < 10 years of education were significantly associated with tobacco use. Of 176, a majority of 132 (75%) used some form of smoking. Of a total of 132 smokers, 70 (53%) were willing to avail of tobacco cessation services.
Conclusion
Tobacco use among presumptive TB patients was high. Considering the high willingness to quit among smokers, proven brief interventions to help quit smoking can be tried.

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Factors Affecting Korean Registered Nurses' Intention to Implement Smoking Cessation Intervention
Sook-Hee Choi, Yun-Hee Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(1):63-70.   Published online February 28, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2015.11.008
  • 2,016 View
  • 16 Download
  • 14 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Nurses have been identified as an instrumental partner in tobacco reduction. This study aimed to examine factors affecting Korean nurses' intention to implement smoking cessation intervention in Busan, Korea.
Methods
The participants were a total of 215 Korean registered nurses. A self-administered questionnaire evaluated predisposing factors, motivational factors (attitude, social influence, and self-efficacy) and intention to implement smoking cessation intervention. Data were analyzed by t tests, Pearson's correlation, and hierarchical multiple regression.
Results
The mean age of the participants was 28.12 ± 5.72 years. The majority of the participants were staff nurses (85.6%), and 64.2% of the sample had < 5 years of work experience. Significant predictors of intention to implement smoking cessation intervention included perceived barrier of smoking cessation intervention (β = −0.128, p = 0.023), willingness to receive smoking cessation training (β = 0.123, p = 0.034), more positive attitude (β = 0.203, p = 0.002), higher social influence (β = 0.292, p < 0.001), and higher self-efficacy toward smoking cessation intervention (β = 0.151, p = 0.021), which explained 45% of the total variance of intention to implement smoking cessation intervention.
Conclusion
Attitude, social influence, and self-efficacy towards smoking cessation intervention had a significant positive influence in determining the intention to implement smoking cessation intervention. These findings can be used to develop evidence-based smoking cessation training programs for nurses in Korea. The programs should aim for positive attitude, higher social influence, and higher self-efficacy in hospital settings.

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Smoking and Alcohol Drinking Related to Experience of Harmful Shops among Korean Adolescents
Jinyoung Kim, Aeree Sohn
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(3):138-147.   Published online June 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.04.005
  • 1,739 View
  • 16 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study was conducted in order to determine any correlation between experience of harmful shops and adolescent smoking and alcohol drinking in middle and high school students.
Methods
The survey was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire online via the homepage of the Ministry of Education student Health Information Center; 1888 and 1563 questionnaires were used for middle and high school students, respectively, for a total of 3451 questionnaires in the final analysis. The collected data were processed using SPSS version 21.0 and examined using frequency analysis and hierarchical linear regression.
Results
In this research, 8.3% of all participants were found to have experienced smoking and 17.0% alcohol drinking. Regarding the types of harmful shops, 81.8% said they had been to a gaming place; 21.2% to a lodging place; 16.0% to a sex and entertainment place; and 6.8% to a harmful sex industry location. Sociodemographic variables had a significant effect on adolescent smoking and alcohol drinking. Regarding environmental variables, a significant difference was observed for living with parents and school location. Among adolescent experience of harmful shops, both smoking and alcohol drinking showed a significant association with harmful sex industry locations.
Conclusion
National government-level management and supervision on this issue will be necessary to prevent adolescent access to harmful shops, along with more studies exploring methods for implementation of policies with more systematic control of harmful shops.

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PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives