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Brief Report
Safety monitoring of COVID-19 vaccination among adolescents aged 12 to 17 years old in the Republic of Korea
Seontae Kim, Insob Hwang, Mijeong Ko, Yunhyung Kwon, Yeon-Kyeng Lee
Received April 8, 2022  Accepted May 12, 2022  Published online June 10, 2022  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0122    [Epub ahead of print]
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aimed to disseminate information on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine safety among adolescents aged 12 to 17 years in the Republic of Korea.
Methods
Two databases were used to assess COVID-19 vaccine safety in adolescents aged 12 to 17 years who completed the primary Pfizer-BioNTech vaccination series. Adverse events reported to the web-based COVID-19 vaccination management system (CVMS) and collected in the text message-based system were analyzed.
Results
From March 5, 2021 to February 13, 2022, 12,216 adverse events among 12- to 17-year-olds were reported to theCVMS, of which 97.1% were non-serious adverse events and 2.9% were serious adverse events, including 85 suspected cases of anaphylaxis, 74 suspected cases of myocarditis and/or pericarditis, and 2 deaths. From December 13, 2021 to January 26, 2022, 10,389 adolescents responded to a text message survey, and local/systemic adverse events were more common after dose 2 than after dose 1. The most commonly reported events following either vaccine dose were pain at the injection site, headache, fatigue/tiredness, and myalgia.
Conclusion
The overall results are consistent with safety data reported in the United States and a controlled trial and serious adverse.events were rare among adolescents aged 12 to 17 years following COVID-19 vaccination.
Review Article
Immune-related therapeutics: an update on antiviral drugs and vaccines to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic
Iqra Mir, Sania Aamir, Syed Rizwan Hussain Shah, Muhammad Shahid, Iram Amin, Samia Afzal, Amjad Nawaz, Muhammad Umer Khan, Muhammad Idrees
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(2):84-100.   Published online April 27, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0024
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Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic rapidly spread globally. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which causes COVID-19, is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus with a reported fatality rate ranging from 1% to 7%, and people with immune-compromised conditions, children, and older adults are particularly vulnerable. Respiratory failure and cytokine storm-induced multiple organ failure are the major causes of death. This article highlights the innate and adaptive immune mechanisms of host cells activated in response to SARS-CoV-2 infection and possible therapeutic approaches against COVID-19. Some potential drugs proven to be effective for other viral diseases are under clinical trials now for use against COVID-19. Examples include inhibitors of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (remdesivir, favipiravir, ribavirin), viral protein synthesis (ivermectin, lopinavir/ ritonavir), and fusion of the viral membrane with host cells (chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine, nitazoxanide, and umifenovir). This article also presents the intellectual groundwork for the ongoing development of vaccines in preclinical and clinical trials, explaining potential candidates (live attenuated-whole virus vaccines, inactivated vaccines, subunit vaccines, DNAbased vaccines, protein-based vaccines, nanoparticle-based vaccines, virus-like particles and mRNA-based vaccines). Designing and developing an effective vaccine (both prophylactic and therapeutic) would be a long-term solution and the most effective way to eliminate the COVID-19 pandemic.
Original Article
COVID-19 outbreak response at a nursing hospital in South Korea in the post-vaccination era, including an estimation of the effectiveness of the first shot of the Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine (ChAdOx1-S)
Chanhee Kim, Geon Kang, Sun Gu Kang, Heeyoung Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(2):114-122.   Published online April 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0262
  • 1,017 View
  • 51 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
We descriptively reviewed a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak at a nursing hospital in Gyeonggi Province (South Korea) and assessed the effectiveness of the first dose of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine in a real-world population. Methods: The general process of the epidemiological investigation included a public health intervention. The relative risk (RR) of vaccinated and unvaccinated groups was calculated and compared to confirm the risk of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARSCoV-2) infection, and vaccine effectiveness was evaluated based on the calculated RR. Results: The population at risk was confined to ward E among 8 wards of Hospital X, where the outbreak occurred. This population comprised 55 people, including 39 patients, 12 nurses, and 4 caregivers, and 19 cases were identified. The RR between the vaccinated and unvaccinated groups was 0.04, resulting in a vaccine effectiveness of 95.3%. The vaccination rate of the nonpatients in ward E was the lowest in the entire hospital, whereas the overall vaccination rate of the combined patient and non-patient groups in ward E was the third lowest. Conclusion: The first dose of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine (ChAdOx1-S) was effective in preventing SARS-CoV-2 infection. To prevent COVID-19 outbreaks in medical facilities, it is important to prioritize the vaccination of healthcare providers.
Review Article
Points to consider for COVID-19 vaccine quality control and national lot release in Republic of Korea: focus on a viral vector platform
Jung Hun Ju, Naery Lee, Sun-hee Kim, Seokkee Chang, Misook Yang, Jihyun Shin, Eunjo Lee, Sunhwa Sung, Jung-Hwan Kim, Jin Tae Hong, Ho Jung Oh
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(1):4-14.   Published online February 8, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0311
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  • 111 Download
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Due to the global public health crisis caused by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the importance of vaccine development has increased. In particular, a rapid supply of vaccines and prompt deployment of vaccination programs are essential to prevent and overcome the spread of COVID-19. As a part of the vaccine regulations, national lot release is regulated by the responsible authorities, and this process involves the assessment of the lot before a vaccine is marketed. A lot can be released for use when both summary protocol (SP) review and quality control testing are complete. Accelerated lot release is required to distribute COVID-19 vaccines in a timely manner. In order to expedite the process by simultaneously undertaking the verification of quality assessment and application for approval, it is necessary to prepare the test methods before marketing authorization. With the prolonged pandemic and controversies regarding the effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccine against new variants, public interest for the development of a new vaccine are increasing. Domestic developers have raised the need to establish standard guidance on the requirements for developing COVID-19 vaccine. This paper presents considerations for quality control in the manufacturing process, test items, and SP content of viral vector vaccines.
Brief Report
COVID-19 vaccine safety monitoring in Republic of Korea from February 26, 2021 to October 31, 2021
Insob Hwang, Kyeongeun Park, Tae Eun Kim, Yunhyung Kwon, Yeon-Kyeng Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(6):396-402.   Published online December 21, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0310
  • 2,615 View
  • 120 Download
  • 1 Citations
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study aimed to present data on reported adverse events following coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination in Republic of Korea from February 26 to October 31, 2021, and to determine whether any significant patterns emerged from an analysis of the characteristics of suspected adverse event cases for each type of vaccine.
Methods
Adverse events following COVID-19 vaccination reported by medical doctors and forensic pathologists were analyzed. Cases of suspected anaphylaxis were classified using the Brighton Collaboration definition.
Results
By October 31, 2021, a total of 353,535 (0.45%) adverse events were reported after 78,416,802 COVID-19 vaccine doses. Of the adverse events, 96.4% were non-serious and 3.6% were serious. The most frequently reported adverse events were headache, myalgia, and dizziness. Of the 835 reported deaths after COVID-19 vaccination, 2 vaccine-related deaths were confirmed. Suspected anaphylaxis was confirmed in 454 cases using the Brighton Collaboration definition.
Conclusion
The commonly reported symptoms were similar to those described in clinical trials. Most reported adverse events were non-serious, and the reporting rate of adverse events following COVID-19 vaccination was higher in women than in men (581 vs. 315 per 100,000 vaccinations). Confirmed anaphylaxis was reported in 5.8 cases per 1,000,000 vaccinations.
Original Article
Factors influencing acceptance of the COVID-19 vaccine in Malaysia: a web-based survey
June Fei Wen Lau, Yuan Liang Woon, Chin Tho Leong, Hoon Shien Teh
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(6):361-373.   Published online November 25, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0085
  • 5,388 View
  • 362 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has set a precedent for the fastest-produced vaccine as a result of global collaboration and outreach. This study explored Malaysians’ acceptance of the COVID-19 vaccine and its associated factors.
Methods
A cross-sectional anonymous web-based survey was disseminated to Malaysian adults aged ≥18 years old via social media platforms between July 10, 2020 and August 31, 2020.
Results
In the analysis of 4,164 complete responses, 93.2% of participants indicated that they would accept the COVID-19 vaccine if it was offered for free by the Malaysian government. The median out-of-pocket cost that participants were willing to pay for a COVID-19 vaccine was Malaysian ringgit (MYR) 100 (interquartile range [IQR], 100) if it was readily available and MYR 150 (IQR, 200) if the supply was limited. Respondents with a low likelihood of vaccine hesitancy had 13 times higher odds of accepting the COVID-19 vaccine (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.69 to 19.13). High perceived risk and severity were also associated with willingness to be vaccinated, with adjusted odds ratios of 2.22 (95% CI, 1.44 to 3.41) and 2.76 (95% CI, 1.87 to 4.09), respectively. Age and ethnicity were the only independent demographic characteristics that predicted vaccine uptake.
Conclusion
Public health strategies targeting perceived risk, perceived susceptibility and vaccine hesitancy could be effective in enhancing vaccine uptake.
Brief Reports
COVID-19 vaccine safety monitoring in the Republic of Korea: February 26, 2021 to April 30, 2021
Hyun-kyung Oh, Eun Kyeong Kim, Insob Hwang, Tae Eun Kim, Yeon-kyeong Lee, Eunju Lee, Yeon-Kyeng Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(4):264-268.   Published online August 13, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0157
  • 2,421 View
  • 103 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
On February 26, 2021, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination was started for high-priority groups based on the recommendation of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices with 2 available COVID-19 vaccines (AstraZeneca and Pfizer-BioNTech) in Korea. This report provides a summary of adverse events following COVID-19 vaccination as of April 30, 2021.
Methods
Adverse events following immunization are notifiable by medical doctors to the Korea Immunization Management System (KIMS) under the national surveillance system. We analyzed all adverse events reports following COVID-19 vaccination to the KIMS from February 26 to April 30, 2021.
Results
In total, 16,196 adverse events following 3,586,814 administered doses of COVID-19 vaccines were reported in approximately 2 months (February 26 to April 30, 2021). Of these, 15,658 (96.7%) were non-serious adverse events, and 538 (3.3%) were serious adverse events, including 73 (0.5%) deaths. The majority of adverse events (n=13,063, 80.7%) were observed in women, and the most frequently reported adverse events were myalgia (52.2%), fever (44.9%), and headache (34.9%). Of the 73 deaths following the COVID-19 vaccination, none were related to the vaccines.
Conclusion
By April 30, 3.6 million doses of the COVID 19 vaccine had been given in Korea, and the overwhelming majority of reports were for non-serious events. The Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency continues to monitor the safety of COVID-19 vaccination.
The laboratory test procedure to confirm rotavirus vaccine infection in severe complex immunodeficiency patients
Su-Jin Chae, Seung-Rye Cho, Wooyoung Choi, Myung-Guk Han, Deog-Yong Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(4):269-273.   Published online August 13, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0079
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AbstractAbstract PDF
The rotavirus vaccine is a live vaccine, and there is a possibility of infection by the virus strain used in the vaccine. We investigated the process of determining whether an infection was caused by the vaccine strain in a severe complex immunodeficiency (SCID) patient with rotavirus infection. The patient was vaccinated with RotaTeq prior to being diagnosed with SCID. The testing process was conducted in the following order: confirming rotavirus infection, determining its genotype, and confirming the vaccine strain. Rotavirus infection was confirmed through enzyme immunoassay and VP6 gene detection. G1 and P[8] were identified by multiplex polymerase chain reaction for the genotype, and G3 was further identified using a single primer. By detecting the fingerprint gene (WC3) of RotaTeq, it was confirmed that the detected virus was the vaccine strain. Genotypes G1 and P[8] were identified, and the infection was suspected of having been caused by rotavirus G1P[8]. G1P[8] is the most commonly detected genotype worldwide and is not included in the recombinant strains used in vaccines. Therefore, the infection was confirmed to have been caused by the vaccine strain by analyzing the genetic relationship between VP4 and VP7. Rotavirus infection by the vaccine strain can be identified through genotyping and fingerprint gene detection. However, genetic linkage analysis will also help to identify vaccine strains.
Original Article
Perceptions of the COVID-19 vaccine and willingness to receive vaccination among health workers in Nigeria
Oluseyi Ademola Adejumo, Olorunfemi Akinbode Ogundele, Cynthia Roli Madubuko, Rosena Olubanke Oluwafemi, Ogochukwu Chinedum Okoye, Kenechukwu Chukwuemeka Okonkwo, Sunday Samson Owolade, Oladimeji Adedeji Junaid, Olutoyin Morenike Lawal, Adenike Christianah Enikuomehin, Maureen Iru Ntaji, Aisha Sokunbi, Aina Omodele Timothy, Olatunji Sunday Abolarin, Emmanuel Olalekan Ali, John Oghenevwirhe Ohaju-Obodo
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(4):236-243.   Published online July 19, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0023
  • 5,389 View
  • 366 Download
  • 10 Citations
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The study aimed to examine health workers’ perceptions of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine in Nigeria and their willingness to receive the vaccine when it becomes available.
Methods
This multi-center cross-sectional study used non-probability convenience sampling to enroll 1,470 hospital workers aged 18 and above from 4 specialized hospitals. A structured and validated self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Data entry and analysis were conducted using IBM SPSS ver. 22.0.
Results
The mean age of respondents was 40±6 years. Only 53.5% of the health workers had positive perceptions of the COVID-19 vaccine, and only slightly more than half (55.5%) were willing to receive vaccination. Predictors of willingness to receive the COVID-19 vaccine included having a positive perception of the vaccine (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 4.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.50−5.69), perceiving a risk of contracting COVID-19 (AOR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.25–3.98), having received tertiary education (AOR, 3.50; 95% CI, 1.40−6.86), and being a clinical health worker (AOR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.01−1.68).
Conclusion
Perceptions of the COVID-19 vaccine and willingness to receive the vaccine were sub-optimal among this group. Educational interventions to improve health workers' perceptions and attitudes toward the COVID-19 vaccine are needed.
Brief Report
Evaluation of Potency on Diphtheria and Tetanus Toxoid for Adult Vaccines by In Vivo Toxin Neutralization Assay Using National Reference Standards
Chan Woong Choi, Jae Hoon Moon, Jae Ok Kim, Si Hyung Yoo, Hyeon Guk Kim, Jung-Hwan Kim, Tae Jun Park, Sung Soon Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2018;9(5):278-282.   Published online October 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2018.9.5.10
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  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Vaccinations against diphtheria and tetanus are essential in providing immunity against these bacterial infections. The potency of diphtheria and tetanus toxoid vaccines can be measured using the in vivo toxin neutralization assay. The limit of potency of this assay was determined only for children. Therefore, we assessed the potency of adult vaccines using this assay to identify the feasibility of limit for adult vaccines.

Methods

Fifteen lots of tetanus-reduced diphtheria and tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis vaccines were used. In vivo toxin neutralization and lethal challenge assays were conducted on each vaccine to calculate the potencies of the toxoids. National reference standards for toxins and antitoxins were used for in vivo toxin neutralization assay.

Results

All 15 lots satisfied the limits of potency for lethal challenge assay. The potency of diphtheria and tetanus toxoids exceeded 1 and 8 units/mL, respectively, for in vivo toxin neutralization assay.

Conclusion

Although additional studies are required for new assays and limits, the current level of potency for adult vaccines as determined by in vivo toxin neutralization assay, was demonstrated in this study. Such efforts to improve assays are expected to promote the development of diphtheria and tetanus vaccines for adults and to contribute to vaccine self-sufficiency.

Original Articles
Development of a New Approach to Determine the Potency of Bacille Calmette–Guérin Vaccines Using Flow Cytometry
Eunjeong Gweon, Chanwoong Choi, Jaeok Kim, Byungkuk Kim, Hyunkyung Kang, Taejun Park, Sangja Ban, Minseok Bae, Sangjin Park, Jayoung Jeong
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(6):389-396.   Published online December 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.6.06
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  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

To circumvent the limitations of the current golden standard method, colony-forming unit (CFU) assay, for viability of Bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG) vaccines, we developed a new method to rapidly and accurately determine the potency of BCG vaccines.

Methods

Based on flow cytometry (FACS) and fluorescein diacetate (FDA) as the most appropriate fluorescent staining reagent, 17 lots of BCG vaccines for percutaneous administration and 5 lots of BCG vaccines for intradermal administration were analyzed in this study. The percentage of viable cells measured by flow cytometry along with the total number of organisms in BCG vaccines, as determined on a cell counter, was used to quantify the number of viable cells.

Results

Pearson correlation coefficients of FACS and CFU assays for percutaneous and intradermal BCG vaccines were 0.6962 and 0.7428, respectively, indicating a high correlation. The coefficient of variation value of the FACS assay was less than 7%, which was 11 times lower than that of the CFU assay.

Conclusion

This study contributes to the evaluation of new potency test method for FACS-based determination of viable cells in BCG vaccines. Accordingly, quality control of BCG vaccines can be significantly improved.

Preparation and Evaluation of a New Lipopolysaccharide-based Conjugate as a Vaccine Candidate for Brucellosis
Seyed Davar Siadat, Farzam Vaziri, Mamak Eftekhary, Maryam Karbasian, Arfa Moshiri, Mohammad R. Aghasadeghi, Mehdi S. Ardestani, Meghdad Abdollahpour Alitappeh, Amin Arsang, Abolfazl Fateh, Shahin Najar Peerayeh, Ahmad R. Bahrmand
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2015;6(1):9-13.   Published online February 28, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.10.012
  • 1,621 View
  • 20 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Development of an efficacious vaccine against brucellosis has been a challenge for scientists for many years. At present, there is no licensed vaccine against human brucellosis. To overcome this problem, currently, antigenic determinants of Brucella cell wall such as Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are considered as potential candidates to develop subunit vaccines.
Methods
In this study, Brucella abortus LPS was used for conjugation to Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B outer membrane vesicle (OMV) as carrier protein using carbodiimide and adipic acid–mediated coupling and linking, respectively. Groups of eight BALB/c mice were injected subcutaneously with 10 μg LPS alone, combined LPS + OMV and conjugated LPS–OMV on 0 days, 14 days, 28 days and 42 days. Anti-LPS IgG was measured in serum.
Results
The yield of LPS to OMV in LPS–OMV conjugate was 46.55%, on the basis of carbohydrate content. The ratio for LPS to OMV was 4.07. The LPS–OMV conjugate was the most immunogenic compound that stimulated following the first injection with increased IgG titer of ∼5-fold and ∼1.3-fold higher than that produced against LPS and LPS in noncovalent complex to OMV (LPS + OMV), respectively. The highest anti-LPS IgG titer was detected 2 weeks after the third injection (Day 42) of LPS–OMV conjugate. The conjugated compound elicited higher titers of IgG than LPS + OMV, that showed a 100–120-fold rise of anti-LPS IgG in mice.
Conclusion
These results indicate that our conjugated LPS–OMV can be used as a brucellosis vaccine, but further investigation is required.
Diversity of Rotavirus Strain Circulated in Gwangju, Republic of Korea
Min Ji Kim, Hye Sook Jeong, Seon Gyeong Kim, Se Mi Lee, Sun Hee Kim, Hye-Young Kee, Eun-hye Jo, Hye-jung Park, Dong-Ryong Ha, Eun Sun Kim, Kye-Won Seo, Jae Keun Chung
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(6):364-369.   Published online December 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.10.004
  • 1,572 View
  • 18 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The introduction of new rotavirus vaccines into the public sphere makes it necessary to maintain constant surveillance and to heighten public awareness of the appearance of new rotavirus strains. We describe the molecular epidemiology of circulating rotavirus strains after vaccine introduction.
Methods
We collected a total of 1070 stool samples from children with gastroenteritis from January 2013 to June 2013. The antigenic prevalence of rotavirus group A was distinguished using enzyme immunoassay. The G and P genotypes of enzyme immunoassay-positive samples were determined with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and nucleotide sequencing analysis.
Results
Of the 1070 samples collected, 277 (25.9%) tested positive for rotaviruses by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay. The most prevalent circulating genotype G was G1 (51.3%), followed by G2 (34.7%) and G9 (10.8%). The predominant type of genotype P was P[8] (66.1%), followed by P[4] (31.4%). In this study, nine genotypes were found. G1P[8] was the most prevalent (51.8%), followed by G2P[4] (30.5%), G9P[8] (9.9%), and G2P[8] (4.0%). Several unusual combinations (G1P[4], G3P[9], G3P[8], G4P[6], and G9P[4]) were also identified.
Conclusion
Molecular epidemiological knowledge of rotaviruses is critical for the development of effective preventive measures, including vaccines. These data will help us monitor the effectiveness of current rotavirus vaccines.
Brief Report
Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever and the Current State of Vaccine Development
Joo Eun Hong, Kee-Jong Hong, Woo Young Choi, Won-Ja Lee, Yeon Hwa Choi, Chung-Hyeon Jeong, Kwang-il Cho
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(6):378-382.   Published online December 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.09.006
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  • 15 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Current Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa already reached the total number of 1,323 including 729 deaths by July 31st. the fatality is around 55% in the southeastern area of Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Nigeria. The number of patients with Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever (EHF) was continuously increasing even though the any effective therapeutics or vaccines has not been developed yet. The Ebola virus in Guinea showed 98% homology with Zaire Ebola Virus.Study of the pathogenesis of Ebola virus infection and assess of the various candidates of vaccine have been tried for a long time, especially in United States and some European countries. Even though the attenuated live vaccine and DNA vaccine containing Ebola viral genes were tested and showed efficacy in chimpanzees, those candidates still need clinical tests requiring much longer time than the preclinical development to be approved for the practical treatment.It can be expected to eradicate Ebola virus by a safe and efficient vaccine development similar to the case of smallpox virus which was extinguished from the world by the variola vaccine.
Original Article
Prevalent Multidrug-resistant Nonvaccine Serotypes in Pneumococcal Carriage of Healthy Korean Children Associated with the Low Coverage of the Seven-valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine
Sungkyoung Lee, Ji-Hye Kim, Seong-Han Kim, Misun Park, Songmee Bae
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(6):316-322.   Published online December 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.10.004
  • 1,359 View
  • 13 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Our previous longitudinal multicenter-based carriage study showed that the average carriage rate of Streptococcus pneumoniae was 16.8% in 582 healthy children attending kindergarten or elementary school in Seoul, Korea. We assessed serotype-specific prevalence and antimicrobial resistance among colonizing pneumococcal isolates from young children in the era of low use of the seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7).
Methods
Serotypes were determined by an agglutination test with specific antisera or by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. An antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed with broth microdilution in Korean 96-well panels from Dade-MicroScan (Sacramento, CA, USA).
Results
Pneumococcal colonization patterns were dynamic and longterm persistent carriage was rare, which indicated a sequential turnover of pneumococcal strains. Of the 369 pneumococci (except for 23 killed isolates), 129 (34.9%) isolates were PCV7 vaccine serotypes (VTs); 213 (57.8%) isolates were nonvaccine serotypes (NVTs); and the remaining 27 (7.2%) isolates were nontypable (NT). The highest rates of multidrug resistance (MDR) were observed in VTs (86.0%; 111/129 isolates) and NVTs (70.0%; 149/213 isolates).
Conclusion
This study overall showed the frequent carriage of VTs and NVTs with MDR in healthy children attending kindergarten or elementary school. Efforts should be directed toward reducing the extensive prescription of antibiotics and using new broader vaccines to reduce the expansion of MDR strains of NVTs in our community.

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives