Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Most cited

Page Path
HOME > Articles and issues > Most cited
53 Most cited
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles

From articles published in Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives during the past two years (2022 ~ ).

Review Articles
India’s efforts to achieve 1.5 billion COVID-19 vaccinations: a narrative review
Kapil Singh, Ashwani Verma, Monisha Lakshminarayan
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(5):316-327.   Published online October 14, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0104
  • 4,225 View
  • 96 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 12 Crossref
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
The initial case of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in India was reported on January 30, 2020, and subsequently, the number of COVID-19-infected patients surged during the first wave of April 2020 and the second wave in the same month of 2021. The government of India imposed a strict nationwide lockdown in April 2020 and extended it until May 2020. The second wave of COVID-19 in India overwhelmed the country’s health facilities and exhausted its medical and paramedical workforce. This narrative review was conducted with the aim of summarizing the evidence drawn from policy documents of governmental and non-governmental organizations, as well as capturing India's COVID-19 vaccination efforts. The findings from this review cover the Indian government's vaccination initiatives, which ranged from steps taken to combat vaccine hesitancy to vaccination roadmaps, deployment plans, the use of digital health technology, vaccination monitoring, adverse effects, and innovative strategies such as Har Ghar Dastak and Jan Bhagidari Andolan (people’s participation). These efforts collectively culminated in the successful administration of more than 1.8 billion doses of COVID-19 vaccines in India. This review also provides insights into other countries’ responses to COVID-19 and guidance for future pandemics.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Digital health technology used in emergency large-scale vaccination campaigns in low- and middle-income countries: a narrative review for improved pandemic preparedness
    Paula Mc Kenna, Lindsay A. Broadfield, Annik Willems, Serge Masyn, Theresa Pattery, Ruxandra Draghia-Akli
    Expert Review of Vaccines.2023; 22(1): 243.     CrossRef
  • Media Reporting Relating to COVID-19 Vaccination as a Driver of Vaccine Hesitancy Prior to the Second Wave of the COVID-19 Pandemic in India: A Content Analysis of Newspaper and Digital Media Reports
    Saurav Basu, Himanshi Sharma
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • An assessment of the strategy and status of COVID-19 vaccination in India
    Sneh Lata Gupta, Surbhi Goswami, Ananya Anand, Namrata Naman, Priya Kumari, Priyanka Sharma, Rishi K. Jaiswal
    Immunologic Research.2023; 71(4): 565.     CrossRef
  • Development of a Choice-framework for Covid vaccines in India using a multi-criteria decision analysis approach
    Tarun K. George, Nayana P. Nair, Awnish Kumar Singh, A. Dilesh Kumar, Arup Deb Roy, Varshini Neethi Mohan, Gagandeep Kang
    Vaccine.2023; 41(25): 3755.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 Booster Dose Coverage and Hesitancy among Older Adults in an Urban Slum and Resettlement Colony in Delhi, India
    Nandini Sharma, Saurav Basu, Heena Lalwani, Shivani Rao, Mansi Malik, Sandeep Garg, Rahul Shrivastava, Mongjam Meghachandra Singh
    Vaccines.2023; 11(7): 1177.     CrossRef
  • Review of the unmet medical need for vaccination in adults with immunocompromising conditions: An Indian perspective
    Ashok Vaid, Neha Rastogi, T. Mark Doherty, Peter San Martin, Yashpal Chugh
    Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Translating the COVID-19 experience in widening the HPV vaccination campaign for cervical cancer in India
    Aruni Ghose, Anisha Agarwal, Bhawna Sirohi, Shona Nag, Linus Chuang, Swarupa Mitra
    Gynecologic Oncology Reports.2023; 48: 101247.     CrossRef
  • Symptomatic prevalence of covid-19 in vaccinated and non-vaccinated population
    Jay Bhupesh Pandya, Nirali Milind Shethia, Divya Bangera, Shailaja Gada Saxena
    IP International Journal of Medical Microbiology a.2023; 9(2): 110.     CrossRef
  • Active surveillance of adverse events following COVID-19 vaccines in a tertiary care hospital
    Naveena Mary Cherian, Dravya Anna Durai, Muhammed Jaisel, Divyansh Sharma, Juny Sebastian, Chetak Kadabasal Basavaraja, Merrin Mathew
    Therapeutic Advances in Vaccines and Immunotherapy.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of ayurvedic formulation, NAOQ19 along with standard care in the treatment of mild-moderate COVID-19 patients: A double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicentric trial
    Pankaj Bhardwaj, Kalaiselvan Ganapathy, Monika Pathania, K.H. Naveen, Jaykaran Charan, Siddhartha Dutta, Ravisekhar Gadepalli, Srikanth Srinivasan, Manoj Kumar Gupta, Akhil D. Goel, Naresh Midha, Bharat Kumar, Meenakshi Sharma, Praveen Sharma, Mithu Baner
    Journal of Ayurveda and Integrative Medicine.2023; 14(6): 100778.     CrossRef
  • Balancing Routine and Pandemic: The Synergy of India’s Universal Immunization Program and COVID-19 Vaccination Program
    Pawan Kumar, Ashish Birendra Chakraborty, Suhas Dhandore, Pritu Dhalaria, Ajeet Kumar Singh, Disha Agarwal, Kapil Singh, Pretty Priyadarshini, Paras Jain, Vidushi Bahl, Gunjan Taneja
    Vaccines.2023; 11(12): 1776.     CrossRef
  • Unveiling vaccine safety: a narrative review of pharmacovigilance in India's COVID-19 vaccination
    Megha Hegde, Saurav Raj, Dhananjay Tikadar, Sanatkumar B Nyamagoud
    Monaldi Archives for Chest Disease.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Yersinia pestis antibiotic resistance: a systematic review
Chen Lei, Suresh Kumar
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(1):24-36.   Published online February 18, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0288
  • 8,225 View
  • 267 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Yersinia pestis, the cause of plague and a potential biological weapon, has always been a threatening pathogen. Some strains of Y. pestis have varying degrees of antibiotic resistance. Thus, this systematic review was conducted to alert clinicians to this pathogen’s potential antimicrobial resistance. A review of the literature was conducted for experimental reports and systematic reviews on the topics of plague, Y. pestis, and antibiotic resistance. From 1995 to 2021, 7 Y. pestis isolates with 4 antibiotic resistance mechanisms were reported. In Y. pestis 17/95, 16/95, and 2180H, resistance was mediated by transferable plasmids. Each plasmid contained resistance genes encoded within specific transposons. Strain 17/95 presented multiple drug resistance, since plasmid 1202 contained 10 resistance determinants. Strains 16/95 and 2180H showed single antibiotic resistance because both additional plasmids in these strains carried only 1 antimicrobial determinant. Strains 12/87, S19960127, 56/13, and 59/13 exhibited streptomycin resistance due to an rpsl gene mutation, a novel mechanism that was discovered recently. Y. pestis can acquire antibiotic resistance in nature not only via conjugative transfer of antimicrobial-resistant plasmids from other bacteria, but also by gene point mutations. Global surveillance should be strengthened to identify antibiotic-resistant Y. pestis strains by whole-genome sequencing and drug susceptibility testing.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Seek and you shall find: Yersinia enterocolitica in Ireland’s drinking water
    James Powell, Maureen Daly, Nuala H. O’Connell, Colum P. Dunne
    Irish Journal of Medical Science (1971 -).2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A novel sORF gene mutant strain of Yersinia pestis vaccine EV76 offers enhanced safety and improved protection against plague
    Xiao Guo, Youquan Xin, Zehui Tong, Shiyang Cao, Yuan Zhang, Gengshan Wu, Hongyan Chen, Tong Wang, Yajun Song, Qingwen Zhang, Ruifu Yang, Zongmin Du, Gregory P. Priebe
    PLOS Pathogens.2024; 20(3): e1012129.     CrossRef
  • Interaction between Yersinia pestis Ail Outer Membrane Protein and the C-Terminal Domain of Human Vitronectin
    Laurine Vasseur, Florent Barbault, Antonio Monari
    The Journal of Physical Chemistry B.2024; 128(16): 3929.     CrossRef
  • Integrated Computational Analysis of Physicochemical Features, Biological Properties, Kinase Target Prediction and Biotransformation Pathways in Drug Discovery
    Mohamed Sabri Bensaad, Dhiya Eddine Bensaad, Mohamed Amine Kahoul, Dania S. Waggas, Roua S. Baty, Rokayya Sami, Hamsa Jameel Banjer, Siraj B. Alharthi, Ruqaiah I. Bedaiwi, Zeyad M. Alharbi, Mohammad A. Alanazi, Nouf H. Alsubhi, Ashwaq M. Al-Nazawi, Nada A
    International Journal of Pharmacology.2024; 20(5): 748.     CrossRef
  • Rapid Induction of Protective Immunity against Pneumonic Plague by Yersinia pestis Polymeric F1 and LcrV Antigens
    Moshe Aftalion, Avital Tidhar, Yaron Vagima, David Gur, Ayelet Zauberman, Tzvi Holtzman, Arik Makovitzki, Theodor Chitlaru, Emanuelle Mamroud, Yinon Levy
    Vaccines.2023; 11(3): 581.     CrossRef
  • Antibiotic resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae: broad-spectrum drug target identification using subtractive genomics
    Umairah Natasya Mohd Omeershffudin, Suresh Kumar
    Genomics & Informatics.2023; 21(1): e5.     CrossRef
  • Polyclonal Antibodies Derived from Transchromosomic Bovines Vaccinated with the Recombinant F1-V Vaccine Increase Bacterial Opsonization In Vitro and Protect Mice from Pneumonic Plague
    Sergei S. Biryukov, Hua Wu, Jennifer L. Dankmeyer, Nathaniel O. Rill, Christopher P. Klimko, Kristi A. Egland, Jennifer L. Shoe, Melissa Hunter, David P. Fetterer, Ju Qiu, Michael L. Davies, Christoph L. Bausch, Eddie J. Sullivan, Thomas Luke, Christopher
    Antibodies.2023; 12(2): 33.     CrossRef
  • New Bacteriophages with Podoviridal Morphotypes Active against Yersinia pestis: Characterization and Application Potential
    Tamar Suladze, Ekaterine Jaiani, Marina Darsavelidze, Maia Elizbarashvili, Olivier Gorge, Ia Kusradze, Tamar Kokashvili, Nino Lashkhi, George Tsertsvadze, Nino Janelidze, Svetlana Chubinidze, Marina Grdzelidze, Shota Tsanava, Eric Valade, Marina Tediashvi
    Viruses.2023; 15(7): 1484.     CrossRef
  • Characterization of Mu-Like Yersinia Phages Exhibiting Temperature Dependent Infection
    Biao Meng, Zhizhen Qi, Xiang Li, Hong Peng, Shanzheng Bi, Xiao Wei, Yan Li, Qi Zhang, Xiaoqing Xu, Haihong Zhao, Xiaoyan Yang, Changjun Wang, Xiangna Zhao, Olaya Rendueles
    Microbiology Spectrum.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Ancient Yersinia pestis genomes lack the virulence-associated Ypf Φ prophage present in modern pandemic strains
    Joanna H. Bonczarowska, Julian Susat, Ben Krause-Kyora, Dorthe Dangvard Pedersen, Jesper Boldsen, Lars Agersnap Larsen, Lone Seeberg, Almut Nebel, Daniel Unterweger
    Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sci.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A situation analysis of the current plague outbreak in the Demographic Republic of Congo and counteracting strategies – Correspondence
    Ranjit Sah, Abdullah Reda, Rachana Mehta, Ranjan K. Mohapatra, Kuldeep Dhama
    International Journal of Surgery.2022; 105: 106885.     CrossRef
  • Antimicrobial resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae: identification of bacterial DNA adenine methyltransferase as a novel drug target from hypothetical proteins using subtractive genomics
    Umairah Natasya Mohd Omeershffudin, Suresh Kumar
    Genomics & Informatics.2022; 20(4): e47.     CrossRef
Brief Report
The effectiveness of Paxlovid treatment in long-term care facilities in South Korea during the outbreak of the Omicron variant of SARS-CoV-2
Hanul Park, Young Joon Park, Hye Young Lee, Mi Yu, Yeong-Jun Song, Sang Eun Lee, Ji-Joo Lee, Eun-Sol Lee, Yeonjung Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(6):443-447.   Published online December 23, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0262
  • 4,060 View
  • 221 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
On November 5, 2021, Pfizer Inc. announced Paxlovid (nirmatrelvir +ritonavir) asa treatment method that could reduce the risk of hospitalization or death for patients withconfirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).Methods: From February 6, 2022 to April 2, 2022, the incidence of COVID-19 and the effectsof treatment with Paxlovid were analyzed in 2,241 patients and workers at 5 long-term carefacilities during the outbreak of the Omicron variant of severe acute respiratory syndromecoronavirus 2 in South Korea.Results: The rate of severe illness or death in the group given Paxlovid was 51% lower thanthat of the non-Paxlovid group (adjusted risk ratio [aRR], 0.49; 95% confidence interval [CI],0.24−0.98). Compared to unvaccinated patients, patients who had completed 3 doses of thevaccine had a 71% reduced rate of severe illness or death (aRR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.13−0.64) and a65% reduced death rate (aRR, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.15−0.79).Conclusion: Patients given Paxlovid showed a lower rate of severe illness or death and alower fatality rate than those who did not receive Paxlovid. Patients who received 3 dosesof the vaccine had a lower rate of severe illness or death and a lower fatality rate than theunvaccinated group.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Efficacy and safety of antiviral treatments for symptomatic COVID-19 outpatients: Systematic review and network meta-analysis
    Meital Zur, Thalia Peselev, Stav Yanko, Victoria Rotshild, Ilan Matok
    Antiviral Research.2024; 221: 105768.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Effectiveness of Ritonavir-Boosted Nirmatrelvir—A Literature Review
    Sydney Paltra, Tim O. F. Conrad
    Advances in Respiratory Medicine.2024; 92(1): 66.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of nirmatrelvir‐ritonavir on severe outcomes of COVID‐19 in the era of vaccination and Omicron: An updated meta‐analysis
    Sien Ombelet, Diego Castanares‐Zapatero, Fabian Desimpel, Frank Hulstaert, Sabine Stordeur, Dominique Roberfroid
    Journal of Medical Virology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological evolution and economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in the European Union and worldwide and effects of control strategies on them: An ecological study
    J.A. Caylà, J.M. Bellmunt, J.M. Jansà, A. Marco, J.P. Millet
    Medicina de Familia. SEMERGEN.2024; 50(6): 102274.     CrossRef
  • COVID‐19 infection in patients with haematological malignancies: A single‐centre survey in the latest Omicron wave in China
    Xiaolu Zhu, Qian Jiang, Jin Lu, Yuqian Sun, Xiaosu Zhao, Shenmiao Yang, Feifei Tang, Wenjing Yu, Ting Zhao, Xiaohong Liu, Jinsong Jia, Wenbing Duan, Lijuan Hu, Jing Wang, Yang Liu, Nan Peng, Xuelin Dou, Rui Ma, Qiang Fu, Huifang Wang, Kaiyan Liu, Xiaojun
    British Journal of Haematology.2023; 202(1): 31.     CrossRef
  • The association mental health of adolescents with economic impact during the COVID-19 pandemic: a 2020 Korean nationally representative survey
    Hanul Park, Kang-Sook Lee
    BMC Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Efficacy and safety of paxlovid (nirmatrelvir/ritonavir) in the treatment of COVID‐19: An updated meta‐analysis and trial sequential analysis
    Haokun Tian, Changsen Yang, Tiangang Song, Kechen Zhou, Lequan Wen, Ye Tian, Lirui Tang, Weikai Xu, Xinyuan Zhang
    Reviews in Medical Virology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Real-World Effectiveness of Nirmatrelvir-Ritonavir and Its Acceptability in High-Risk COVID-19 Patients
    Min-Kyung Kim, Kyung-Shin Lee, Sin Young Ham, Youn Young Choi, Eunyoung Lee, Seungjae Lee, Bora Lee, Jaehyun Jeon, BumSik Chin, Yeonjae Kim, Gayeon Kim, Hee-Chang Jang, Jae-Phil Choi, Sang-Won Park
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of Molnupiravir Treatment in Patients with COVID-19 in Korea: A Propensity Score Matched Study
    Hye Rim Park, Min-Gyu Yoo, Jong Mu Kim, Soon Jong Bae, Hyungmin Lee, Jungyeon Kim
    Infection & Chemotherapy.2023; 55(4): 490.     CrossRef
  • Nirmatrelvir combined with ritonavir for preventing and treating COVID-19
    Stefanie Reis, Maria-Inti Metzendorf, Rebecca Kuehn, Maria Popp, Ildiko Gagyor, Peter Kranke, Patrick Meybohm, Nicole Skoetz, Stephanie Weibel
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Brief Report
Isolation and identification of monkeypox virus MPXV-ROK-P1-2022 from the first case in the Republic of Korea
Jin-Won Kim, Minji Lee, Hwachul Shin, Chi-Hwan Choi, Myung-Min Choi, Jee Woong Kim, Hwajung Yi, Cheon-Kwon Yoo, Gi-Eun Rhie
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(4):308-311.   Published online August 31, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0232
  • 6,163 View
  • 142 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Monkeypox outbreaks in nonendemic countries have been reported since early May 2022. The first case of monkeypox in the Republic of Korea was confirmed in a patient who traveled to Europe in June 2022, and an attempt was made to isolate and identify the monkeypox virus (MPXV) from the patient’s specimens.
Methods
Clinical specimens from the patient were inoculated in Vero E6 cells. The isolated virus was identified as MPXV by the observation of cytopathic effects on Vero E6 cells, transmission electron microscopy, conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and sequencing of PCR products.
Results
Cytopathic effects were observed in Vero E6 cells that were inoculated with skin lesion swab eluates. After multiple passages from the primary culture, orthopoxvirus morphology was observed using transmission electron microscopy. In addition, both MPXV-specific (F3L and ATI) and orthopoxvirus-specific genes (A39R, B2R, and HA) were confirmed by conventional PCR and Sanger sequencing.
Conclusion
These results indicate the successful isolation and identification of MPXV from the first patient in the Republic of Korea. The isolated virus was named MPXV-ROK-P1-2022.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Ultrasensitive one-pot detection of monkeypox virus with RPA and CRISPR in a sucrose-aided multiphase aqueous system
    Yue Wang, Yixin Tang, Yukang Chen, Guangxi Yu, Xue Zhang, Lihong Yang, Chenjie Zhao, Pei Wang, Song Gao, Frederick S. B. Kibenge, Ruijie Deng, Wei Chen, Shuang Yang
    Microbiology Spectrum.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological, Clinical, and Virological Investigation of the First Four Cases of Monkeypox in Cartagena during the 2022 Outbreak
    Steev Loyola, Mashiel Fernández-Ruiz, Doris Gómez-Camargo
    Pathogens.2023; 12(2): 159.     CrossRef
  • 원숭이두창바이러스의 분리 배양과 전장유전체 정보 분석
    민지 이, 진원 김, 치환 최, 화철 신, 명민 최, 상은 이, 화중 이, 윤석 정
    Public Health Weekly Report.2023; 16(15): 464.     CrossRef
  • Overview of Diagnostic Methods, Disease Prevalence and Transmission of Mpox (Formerly Monkeypox) in Humans and Animal Reservoirs
    Ravendra P. Chauhan, Ronen Fogel, Janice Limson
    Microorganisms.2023; 11(5): 1186.     CrossRef
  • How to cope with suspected mpox patients in the outpatient clinic
    Nam Joong Kim, Sun Huh
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2023; 66(5): 325.     CrossRef
  • An Updated Review on Monkeypox Viral Disease: Emphasis on Genomic Diversity
    Ali A. Rabaan, Nada A. Alasiri, Mohammed Aljeldah, Abeer N. Alshukairiis, Zainab AlMusa, Wadha A. Alfouzan, Abdulmonem A. Abuzaid, Aref A. Alamri, Hani M. Al-Afghani, Nadira Al-baghli, Nawal Alqahtani, Nadia Al-baghli, Mashahed Y. Almoutawa, Maha Mahmoud
    Biomedicines.2023; 11(7): 1832.     CrossRef
  • Monkeypox (Mpox) virus isolation and ultrastructural characterisation from a Brazilian human sample case
    Milene Dias Miranda, Gabriela Cardoso Caldas, Vivian Neuza Ferreira, Ortrud Monika Barth, Aline de Paula Dias da Silva, Mayara Secco Torres Silva, Beatriz Grinsztejn, Valdiléa Gonçalves Veloso, Thiago Moreno Souza, Edson Elias da Silva, Debora Ferreira Ba
    Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Isolation and Characterization of Monkeypox Virus from the First Case of Monkeypox — Chongqing Municipality, China, 2022
    Baoying Huang, Hua Zhao, Jingdong Song, Li Zhao, Yao Deng, Wen Wang, Roujian Lu, Wenling Wang, Jiao Ren, Fei Ye, Houwen Tian, Guizhen Wu, Hua Ling, Wenjie Tan
    China CDC Weekly.2022; 4(46): 1019.     CrossRef
Review Article
Carbapenem resistance in critically important human pathogens isolated from companion animals: a systematic literature review
Angie Alexandra Rincón-Real, Martha Cecilia Suárez-Alfonso
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(6):407-423.   Published online December 16, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0033
  • 3,355 View
  • 156 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
This study aimed to describe the presence and geographical distribution of Gram-negativebacteria considered critical on the priority list of antibiotic-resistant pathogens publishedby the World Health Organization, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae,carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp., and carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.A systematic review of original studies published in 5 databases between 2010 and 2021 wasconducted, including genotypically confirmed carbapenem-resistant isolates obtained fromcanines, felines, and their settings. Fifty-one articles met the search criteria. Carbapenemresistant isolates were found in domestic canines and felines, pet food, and on veterinarymedical and household surfaces. The review found that the so-called “big five”—that is, the5 major carbapenemases identified worldwide in Enterobacterales (New Delhi metallo-βlactamase, active-on-imipenem, Verona integron-encoded metallo-β-lactamase, Klebsiellapneumoniae carbapenemase, and oxacillin [OXA]-48-like)—and the 3 most importantcarbapenemases from Acinetobacter spp. (OXA-23-like, OXA-40-like, and OXA-58-like) hadbeen detected in 8 species in the Enterobacteriaceae family and 5 species of glucose nonfermenting bacilli on 5 continents. Two publications used molecular analysis to confirmcarbapenem-resistant bacteria transmission between owners and dogs. Isolating criticallyimportant human carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria from domestic canines andfelines highlights the importance of including these animal species in surveillance programsand antimicrobial resistance containment plans as part of the One Health approach.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • First report of a blaNDM-5-carrying Escherichia coli sequence type 12 isolated from a dog with pyometra in Japan
    Kazuki Harada, Tadashi Miyamoto, Michiyo Sugiyama, Tetsuo Asai
    Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The European Union summary report on antimicrobial resistance in zoonotic and indicator bacteria from humans, animals and food in 2021–2022

    EFSA Journal.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological analysis and prevention strategies in response to a shigellosis cluster outbreak: a retrospective case series in an alternative school in the Republic of Korea, 2023
    Yeongseo Ahn, Sunmi Jin, Gemma Park, Hye Young Lee, Hyungyong Lee, Eunkyung Shin, Junyoung Kim, Jaeil Yoo, Yuna Kim
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2024; 15(1): 68.     CrossRef
  • Carbapenem Resistance in Animal-Environment-Food from Africa: A Systematic Review, Recommendations and Perspectives
    Komla Dossouvi, Ayawovi Selom Ametepe
    Infection and Drug Resistance.2024; Volume 17: 1699.     CrossRef
  • The European Union Summary Report on Antimicrobial Resistance in zoonotic and indicator bacteria from humans, animals and food in 2020/2021

    EFSA Journal.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Resistome-based surveillance identifies ESKAPE pathogens as the predominant gram-negative organisms circulating in veterinary hospitals
    Flavia Zendri, Cajsa M. Isgren, Jane Devaney, Vanessa Schmidt, Rachel Rankin, Dorina Timofte
    Frontiers in Microbiology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Unveiling the emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens in exotic pets from France: a comprehensive study (2017-2019)
    Sandro Cardoso, Aurélie Le Loc’h, Inês Marques, Anabela Almeida, Sérgio Sousa, Maria José Saavedra, Sofia Anastácio, Eduarda Silveira
    One Health & Implementation Research.2023; 3(4): 161.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Safety monitoring of COVID-19 vaccination among adolescents aged 12 to 17 years old in the Republic of Korea
Seontae Kim, Insob Hwang, Mijeong Ko, Yunhyung Kwon, Yeon-Kyeng Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(3):230-237.   Published online June 10, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0122
  • 4,445 View
  • 141 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aimed to disseminate information on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine safety among adolescents aged 12 to 17 years in the Republic of Korea. Methods: Two databases were used to assess COVID-19 vaccine safety in adolescents aged 12 to 17 years who completed the primary Pfizer-BioNTech vaccination series. Adverse events reported to the web-based COVID-19 vaccination management system (CVMS) and collected in the text message-based system were analyzed. Results: From March 5, 2021 to February 13, 2022, 12,216 adverse events among 12- to 17-yearolds were reported to the CVMS, of which 97.1% were non-serious adverse events and 2.9% were serious adverse events, including 85 suspected cases of anaphylaxis, 74 suspected cases of myocarditis and/or pericarditis, and 2 deaths. From December 13, 2021 to January 26, 2022, 10,389 adolescents responded to a text message survey, and local/systemic adverse events were more common after dose 2 than after dose 1. The most commonly reported events following either vaccine dose were pain at the injection site, headache, fatigue/tiredness, and myalgia. Conclusion: The overall results are consistent with previous findings; the great majority of adverse events were non-serious, and serious adverse events were rare among adolescents aged 12 to 17 years following Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccination.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Characterization of Brighton Collaboration criteria for myocarditis and pericarditis following COVID-19 vaccine in Korean adolescents
    Jue Seong Lee, HyoSug Choi, Seung Hwan Shin, Myung-Jae Hwang, Sara Na, Jong Hee Kim, Sangshin Park, Yoonsun Yoon, Hyun Mi Kang, Bin Ahn, Kyoungsan Seo, Young June Choe
    Vaccine.2024; 42(14): 3333.     CrossRef
  • Immunogenicity, effectiveness, and safety of COVID-19 vaccines among children and adolescents aged 2–18 years: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis
    Peng Gao, Liang-Yu Kang, Jue Liu, Min Liu
    World Journal of Pediatrics.2023; 19(11): 1041.     CrossRef
  • Incidence of myopericarditis after mRNA COVID-19 vaccination: A meta-analysis with focus on adolescents aged 12–17 years
    Bao-Qiang Guo, Hong-Bin Li, Li-Qiang Yang
    Vaccine.2023; 41(28): 4067.     CrossRef
  • Safety monitoring of COVID-19 vaccines: February 26, 2021, To June 4, 2022, Republic of Korea
    Yeon-Kyeng Lee, Yunhyung Kwon, Yesul Heo, Eun Kyoung Kim, Seung Yun Kim, Hoon Cho, Seontae Kim, Mijeong Ko, Dosang Lim, Soon-Young Seo, Enhi Cho
    Clinical and Experimental Pediatrics.2023; 66(10): 415.     CrossRef
  • Risk of Coronavirus Disease 2019 Messenger RNA Vaccination-Associated Myocarditis and Pericarditis – A Systematic Review of Population-Based Data
    Yen-Ching Lin, Chia-Hsuin Chang, Wei-Ju Su, Chin-Hui Yang, Jann-Tay Wang
    Risk Management and Healthcare Policy.2023; Volume 16: 2085.     CrossRef
  • Suspected Myocarditis after mRNA COVID-19 Vaccination among South Korean Adolescents
    Mi Jin Kim, Jin Hee Kim, Hyun Ok Jun, Kyung Min Kim, Min Sub Jeung, Jun Sung Park
    Journal of Pediatric Infectious Diseases.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 Vaccination in Korea: Past, Present, and the Way Forward
    Eliel Nham, Joon Young Song, Ji Yun Noh, Hee Jin Cheong, Woo Joo Kim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Short Communication
COVID-19 outbreak and risk factors for infection in a taekwondo gym in the Republic of Korea
Seung Hwan Shin, Eonjoo Park, Sookhyun Kim, Minji Jang, Subin Park, Dong-Hwi Kim, Tae Jong Son, Ji-Hyuk Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(2):162-170.   Published online March 31, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0295
  • 4,624 View
  • 118 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Relatively few studies have assessed risk factors for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in public facilities used by children and adolescents. This study presents an analysis of a COVID-19 outbreak that occurred in a taekwondo gym in Korea, predominantly among children and adolescents, with the aim of providing insights on managing COVID-19 outbreaks in similar facilities. Methods: All 108 taekwondo gym students and staff received COVID-19 tests. A survey and closed-circuit television analyses were used to identify risk factors. A univariate analysis was conducted, followed by multivariate logistic regression analysis with backward elimination for variables with a significance level <0.10 in the univariate analysis. Results: COVID-19 was confirmed in 30 of 108 subjects at the taekwondo gym (attack rate, 27.8%). The outbreak started in an adult class student. This student transmitted the virus to the staff, who consequently transmitted the virus to adolescent students. In the univariate analysis, the relative risk for younger age (≤9 years) was 2.14 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01–4.54; p=0.054), and that for food consumption inside the gym was 2.12 (95% CI, 1.04–4.30; p=0.048). In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, the odds ratio for younger age was 2.96 (95% CI, 1.07–8.20; p=0.036), and that for food consumption inside the gym was 3.00 (95% CI, 1.10–8.17; p=0.032). Conclusion: Food consumption inside the facility and young age were significant risk factors for COVID-19 transmission in this taekwondo gym. Food consumption should be prohibited in sports facilities, and infection prevention education for young students is also required.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The First Outbreak of Novel Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) at an Outdoor Camping Site in South Korea, 2020
    Na-Young Kim, Seonhee Ahn, GwangJin Kim, Donghyok Kwon, Young-Joon Park, Sang-Eun Lee
    Journal of Epidemiology.2024; 34(4): 203.     CrossRef
  • Risk evaluation of venue types and human behaviors of COVID-19 outbreaks in public indoor environments: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Weiwei Huang, Caroline X. Gao, Danting Luo, Yong Wang, Xiaohong Zheng, Cong Liu, Ying Wang, Yuguo Li, Hua Qian
    Environmental Pollution.2024; 341: 122970.     CrossRef
  • Investigating Factors Contributing to the Occurrence of COVID-19 Outbreaks in Athletes in a Scoping Review
    Shuichi KASAMA, Haruyo SAKAKI, Eiko ENDO
    Taiikugaku kenkyu (Japan Journal of Physical Educa.2024; 69: 151.     CrossRef
  • SARS-CoV-2 transmission modes: Why and how contamination occurs around shared meals and drinks?
    Aure Saulnier, Jean-Michel Wendling, Benoit Hermant, Didier Lepelletier
    Food Microbiology.2023; 114: 104297.     CrossRef
  • Risk factors for COVID-19 outbreaks in livestock slaughtering and processing facilities in Republic of Korea
    Seongju Choi, Tae Jong Son, Yeon-Kyung Lee
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2023; 14(3): 207.     CrossRef
  • Protective facemask-induced facial thermal stress and breathing burden during exercise in gyms
    Qilong Zhong, Jiyun Song, Dachuan Shi, Chung-Hin Dung
    Building and Environment.2023; 244: 110840.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Menstrual hygiene management and its determinants among adolescent girls in low-income urban areas of Delhi, India: a community-based study
Suneela Garg, Nidhi Bhatnagar, Mongjam Meghachandra Singh, Saurav Basu, Amod Borle, Yamini Marimuthu, Falak Azmi, Yomri Dabi, Indu Bala
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(4):273-281.   Published online August 31, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0127
  • 3,886 View
  • 276 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Menstrual hygiene management (MHM) in developing countries is linked to human rights, social justice, and the education and empowerment of young girls. The objective of this study was to assess menstrual hygiene practices and their determinants among adolescent girls, including school dropouts, and the effects of pad distribution programs in urban resettlement areas of Delhi, India.
Methods
A cross-sectional study was conducted from March 2019 to February 2020 in urban resettlement colonies and 2 villages of Delhi among 1,130 adolescent girls aged 10 to 19 years, who were interviewed face to face.
Results
In total, 954 participants (84.4%) used only disposable sanitary pads, 150 (13.3%) used both sanitary pads and cloths, and 26 (2.3%) used only cloths (n=1,130). Most school-going girls utilized the scheme for pad distribution, but only two-thirds of the girls who were out of school utilized the scheme. In the adjusted analysis, girls with lower educational status, those who had dropped out of school, and those from the Muslim religious community were more likely to use cloths for MHM.
Conclusion
More than 4 out of 5 adolescent girls in Delhi in low-income neighborhoods preferred sanitary pads for MHM. The government free pad scheme reached near-universal utilization among school-going girls (97%), but the subsidized pad scheme for girls who did not attend school was insufficiently utilized (75%).

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Factors Associated with Exclusive Use of Hygienic Methods during Menstruation among Adolescent Girls (15–19 Years) in Urban India: Evidence from NFHS-5
    Doli Roy, Nuruzzaman Kasemi, Manik Halder, Malasree Majumder
    Heliyon.2024; 10(8): e29731.     CrossRef
  • Enhancement of Health-related Quality of Life among School-going Adolescent Girls with Improvement in Menstrual Hygiene Knowledge and Practices
    Akanksha Goyal, Sunita Agarwal
    Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences.2024; 12(1): 73.     CrossRef
  • Menstrual Hygiene Problems and Challenges Faced by Adolescent Females in Rural Areas: A Narrative Review
    Vijiya Kashyap, Sonali G Choudhari
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Perceived difficulties in maintaining menstrual hygiene practices among indigenous adolescents during seasonal water scarcity periods in Bandarban hill district of Bangladesh: A cross-sectional study
    Imdadul Haque Talukdar, M.A. Rifat, Plabon Sarkar, Nobonita Saha, Mesfin Kassaye Tessma, Md. Ibrahim Miah
    International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental.2023; 254: 114268.     CrossRef
  • Menstrual hygiene practices among adolescent women in rural India: a cross-sectional study
    Aditya Singh, Mahashweta Chakrabarty, Shivani Singh, Rakesh Chandra, Sourav Chowdhury, Anshika Singh
    BMC Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Associations of pre-existing cardiovascular morbidity with severity and the fatality rate in COVID-19 patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Foad Alzoughool, Suhad Abumweis, Lo’ai Alanagreh, Manar Atoum
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(1):37-50.   Published online February 18, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0186
  • 4,751 View
  • 116 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of pre-existing cardiovascular comorbidities, including hypertension and coronary heart disease, with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) severity and mortality. Methods: PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Scopus were searched between January 1, 2020, and July 18, 2020, to identify eligible studies. Random-effect models were used to estimate the pooled event rates of pre-existing cardiovascular disease comorbidities and odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) of disease severity and mortality associated with the exposures of interest. Results: A total of 34 studies involving 19,156 patients with COVID-19 infection met the inclusion criteria. The prevalence of pre-existing cardiovascular disease in the included studies was 14.0%. Pre-existing cardiovascular disease in COVID-19 patients was associated with severe outcomes (OR, 4.1; 95% CI, 2.9 to 5.7) and mortality (OR, 6.1; 95% CI, 2.9 to 12.7). Hypertension and coronary heart disease increased the risk of severe outcomes by 2.6 times (OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.9 to 3.6) and 2.5 times (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.7 to 3.8), respectively. No significant publication bias was indicated. Conclusion: COVID-19 patients with pre-existing cardiovascular comorbidities have a higher risk of severe outcomes and mortality. Awareness of pre-existing cardiovascular comorbidity is important for the early management of COVID-19.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Asthma and clinical outcomes of COVID-19 in a community setting
    L. Jiao, D. Bujnowski, P. Liu, E. Bakota, L. Liu, Y. Ye, A. Dewangan, C.N. Duong, E. Kviten, S. Zaheer, A. Zangeneh, R. Roy, J. Floyd, J. Monroy, D. Wiltz-Beckham
    Public Health.2024; 226: 84.     CrossRef
  • Understanding factors affecting implementation success and sustainability of a comprehensive prevention program for cardiovascular disease in primary health care: a qualitative process evaluation study combining RE-AIM and CFIR
    Naomi Aerts, Kathleen Van Royen, Peter Van Bogaert, Lieve Peremans, Hilde Bastiaens
    Primary Health Care Research & Development.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • New Scenarios in Heart Transplantation and Persistency of SARS-CoV-2 (Case Report)
    Lubov Mitrofanova, Igor Makarov, Andrey Gorshkov, Olga Vorobeva, Maria Simonenko, Anna Starshinova, Dmitry Kudlay, Tatiana Karonova
    Life.2023; 13(7): 1551.     CrossRef
  • Prognostic Factors of COVID‐19: An Umbrella Review Endorsed by the International Society for Pharmacoepidemiology
    Grammati Sarri, Wei Liu, Luke Zabotka, Andreas Freitag, Ravinder Claire, Grace Wangge, Jamie Elvidge, Dalia Dawoud, Dimitri Bennett, Xuerong Wen, Xiaojuan Li, Christopher T. Rentsch, Md Jamal Uddin, M. Sanni Ali, Mugdha Gokhale, Anouk Déruaz‐Luyet, Daniel
    Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics.2023; 114(3): 604.     CrossRef
  • Comorbidities in congenital heart disease: different patterns in childhood and adulthood
    Zhibao Ding, Jingai Zhu, Ye Ding, Chun Zhu
    BMC Cardiovascular Disorders.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Short Communication
Epidemiological characteristics of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae outbreaks in the Republic of Korea between 2017 and 2022
Hyoseon Jeong, Junghee Hyun, Yeon-Kyeng Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2023;14(4):312-320.   Published online August 21, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2023.0069
  • 1,455 View
  • 151 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
We aimed to describe the epidemiological characteristics of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) outbreaks in healthcare settings in the Republic of Korea between 2017 and 2022.
Methods
Under the national notifiable disease surveillance system, we obtained annual descriptive statistics regarding the isolated species, carbapenemase genotype, healthcare facility type, outbreak location and duration, and number of patients affected and recommended interventions. We used epidemiological investigation reports on CPE outbreaks reported to Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency from June 2017 to September 2022.
Results
Among the 168 reports analyzed, Klebsiella pneumoniae (85.1%) was the most frequently reported species, while K. pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC, 82.7%) was the most common carbapenemase genotype. Both categories increased from 2017 to 2022 (p<0.01). General hospitals had the highest proportion (54.8%), while tertiary general hospitals demonstrated a decreasing trend (p<0.01). The largest proportion of outbreaks occurred exclusively in intensive care units (ICUs, 44.0%), and the frequency of concurrent outbreaks in ICUs and general wards increased over time (p<0.01). The median outbreak duration rose from 43.5 days before the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic (2017–2019) to 79.5 days during the pandemic (2020–2022) (p=0.01), and the median number of patients associated with each outbreak increased from 5.0 to 6.0 (p=0.03). Frequently recommended interventions included employee education (38.1%), and 3 or more measures were proposed for 45.2% of outbreaks.
Conclusion
In the Republic of Korea, CPE outbreaks have been consistently dominated by K. pneumoniae and KPC. The size of these outbreaks increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our findings highlight the need for continuing efforts to control CPE outbreaks using a multimodal approach, while considering their epidemiology.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comparison of clinical outcomes of patients with serial negative surveillance cultures according to a subsequent polymerase chain reaction test for carbapenemase-producing Enterobacterales
    H. Seo, S. Kim, Y.W. Lee, H.S. Oh, H-S. Kim, Y.K. Kim
    Journal of Hospital Infection.2024; 146: 93.     CrossRef
  • Identifying Contact Time Required for Secondary Transmission of Clostridioides difficile Infections by Using Real-Time Locating System
    Min Hyung Kim, Jaewoong Kim, Heejin Ra, Sooyeon Jeong, Yoon Soo Park, Dongju Won, Hyukmin Lee, Heejung Kim
    Emerging Infectious Diseases.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Antimicrobial activity of ceftazidime-avibactam against KPC-2-producing Enterobacterales: a cross-combination and dose-escalation titration study with relebactam and vaborbactam
    Min Seo Kang, Jin Yang Baek, Jae-Hoon Ko, Sun Young Cho, Keon Young Lee, Young Ho Lee, Jinyoung Yang, Tae Yeul Kim, Hee Jae Huh, Nam Yong Lee, Kyungmin Huh, Cheol-In Kang, Doo Ryeon Chung, Kyong Ran Peck, Bobby G. Warren
    Microbiology Spectrum.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Performance comparison of BD Phoenix CPO detect panel with Cepheid Xpert Carba-R assay for the detection of carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates
    Nazmiye Ülkü Tüzemen, Uğur Önal, Osman Merdan, Bekir Akca, Beyza Ener, Halis Akalın, Cüneyt Özakın
    BMC Microbiology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
Special Article
A framework for nationwide COVID-19 vaccine safety research in the Republic of Korea: the COVID-19 Vaccine Safety Research Committee
Na-Young Jeong, Hyesook Park, Sanghoon Oh, Seung Eun Jung, Dong-Hyun Kim, Hyoung-Shik Shin, Hee Chul Han, Jong-Koo Lee, Jun Hee Woo, Byung-Joo Park, Nam-Kyong Choi
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2023;14(1):5-14.   Published online February 28, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2023.0026
  • 3,423 View
  • 160 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
With the introduction of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccines, the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency (KDCA) commissioned the National Academy of Medicine of Korea to gather experts to independently assess post-vaccination adverse events. Accordingly, the COVID-19 Vaccine Safety Research Committee (CoVaSC) was launched in November 2021 to perform safety studies and establish evidence for policy guidance. The CoVaSC established 3 committees for epidemiology, clinical research, and communication. The CoVaSC mainly utilizes pseudonymized data linking KDCA’s COVID-19 vaccination data and the National Health Insurance Service’s claims data. The CoVaSC’s 5-step research process involves defining the target diseases and organizing ad-hoc committees, developing research protocols, performing analyses, assessing causal relationships, and announcing research findings and utilizing them to guide compensation policies. As of 2022, the CoVaSC completed this research process for 15 adverse events. The CoVaSC launched the COVID-19 Vaccine Safety Research Center in September 2022 and has been reorganized into 4 divisions to promote research including international collaborative studies, long-/short-term follow-up studies, and education programs. Through these enhancements, the CoVaSC will continue to swiftly provide scientific evidence for COVID-19 vaccine research and compensation and may serve as a model for preparing for future epidemics of new diseases.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Risk of encephalitis and meningitis after COVID-19 vaccination in South Korea: a self-controlled case series analysis
    Ju Hwan Kim, Dongwon Yoon, Hwa Yeon Ko, Kyungyeon Jung, Jun-Sang Sunwoo, Won Chul Shin, Jung-Ick Byun, Ju-Young Shin
    BMC Medicine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The COVID-19 Vaccine Safety Research Center: a cornerstone for strengthening safety evidence for COVID-19 vaccination in the Republic of Korea
    Na-Young Jeong, Hyesook Park, Sanghoon Oh, Seung Eun Jung, Dong-Hyun Kim, Hyoung-Shik Shin, Hee Chul Han, Jong-Koo Lee, Jun Hee Woo, Jaehun Jung, Joongyub Lee, Ju-Young Shin, Sun-Young Jung, Byung-Joo Park, Nam-Kyong Choi
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2024; 15(2): 97.     CrossRef
  • To become a more stronger and safer country
    Jong-Koo Lee
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2023; 14(2): 67.     CrossRef
  • Risk of lymphadenopathy from SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in Korea: a self-controlled case series analysis
    Mi-Sook Kim, Bongyoung Kim, Jeong Pil Choi, Nam-Kyong Choi, Jung Yeon Heo, Jun Yong Choi, Joongyub Lee, Sang Il Kim
    Epidemiology and Health.2023; 45: e2023090.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Presumed population immunity to SARS-CoV-2 in South Korea, April 2022
Eun Jung Jang, Young June Choe, Seung Ah Choe, Yoo-Yeon Kim, Ryu Kyung Kim, Jia Kim, Do Sang Lim, Ju Hee Lee, Seonju Yi, Sangwon Lee, Young-Joon Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(5):377-381.   Published online October 14, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0209
  • 2,542 View
  • 73 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
We estimated the overall and age-specific percentages of the Korean population with presumed immunity against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARSCoV-2) as of April 2022 using the national registry.
Methods
We used the national coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection and vaccination registry from South Korea, as described to define individuals with a previous history of COVID-19 infection, vaccination, or both, as persons with presumed immunity.
Results
Of a total of 53,304,627 observed persons, 24.4% had vaccination and infection, 58.1% had vaccination and no infection, 7.6% had infection and no vaccination, and 9.9% had no immunity. The SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant emerged at a time when the presumed population immunity ranged from 80% to 85%; however, nearly half of the children were presumed to have no immunity.
Conclusion
We report a gap in population immunity, with lower presumed protection in children than in adults. The approach presented in this work can provide valuable informed tools to assist vaccine policy-making at a national level.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Realistic Estimation of COVID-19 Infection by Seroprevalence Surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 Antibodies: An Experience From Korea Metropolitan Area From January to May 2022
    In Hwa Jeong, Jong-Hun Kim, Min-Jung Kwon, Jayoung Kim, Hee Jin Huh, Byoungguk Kim, Junewoo Lee, Jeong-hyun Nam, Eun-Suk Kang
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Epidemiology of Coronavirus Disease 2019 in Infants and Toddlers, Seoul, South Korea
    JiWoo Sim, Euncheol Son, Young June Choe
    Pediatric Infection & Vaccine.2024; 31(1): 94.     CrossRef
  • Predicting adherence to COVID-19 preventive measures among South Korean adults aged 40 to 69 Years using the expanded health empowerment model
    Su-Jung Nam, Tae-Young Pak
    SSM - Population Health.2023; 22: 101411.     CrossRef
  • Acute COVID-19 in unvaccinated children without a history of previous infection during the delta and omicron periods
    Jee Min Kim, Ji Yoon Han, Seung Beom Han
    Postgraduate Medicine.2023; 135(7): 727.     CrossRef
Original Articles
A case-control study of acute hepatitis A in South Korea, 2019
Jung Hee Hyun, Ju Young Yoon, Sang Hyuk Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(5):352-359.   Published online October 12, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0141
  • 3,264 View
  • 122 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
We aimed to reconfirm the source of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection through epidemiological and genotype investigations of individual cases in a 2019 outbreak in South Korea. Methods: We investigated food intake histories, associations with hepatitis A, and genotypes of HAV in 31 patients with hepatitis aged 20 to 49 years registered in the integrated disease and health management system during December 1–7, 2019 (case group) and in 35 sex- and agematched people without a history of HAV vaccination or infection among patients’ families and colleagues (control group). Results: The consumption of salted clams was a significant factor (odds ratio, 4.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.32–14.18) in the risk factor analysis of food intake history. HAV genotypes were analyzed in 24 of 31 patients. Type IA and type IIIA were found in 23 and 1 cases, respectively. Conclusion: Salted clams are considered to have been the source of HAV infection at 49 weeks of the HAV outbreak in 2019; this result was consistent with that of a previous epidemiological investigation conducted by the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency in September 2019. Therefore, monitoring of the production and distribution of salted clams needs to be continued.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Monitoring viruses and beta-lactam resistance genes through wastewater surveillance during a COVID-19 surge in Suwon, South Korea
    Rajendra Singh, Jaewon Ryu, Sung Soo Park, Sungpyo Kim, Keugtae Kim
    Science of The Total Environment.2024; 922: 171223.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of foodborne viruses and influenza A virus from poultry processing plants to retailed chickens
    Daseul Yeo, Mengxiao Song, Md. Iqbal Hossain, Soontag Jung, Zhaoqi Wang, Dong Joo Seo, Min Suk Rhee, Changsun Choi
    Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Study on the Detection Rate of Hepatitis A from Gastroenteritis Patients and the Genotype Analysis of Hepatitis A Virus in Busan
    Sun Hee Park, Chanhee Kim, Summi Lee, Jihye Jeong, Junghye Choi, Seung Ju Lee
    Journal of Bacteriology and Virology.2023; 53(2): 74.     CrossRef
  • A Study on the Detection Rate of Hepatitis A from Gastroenteritis Patients and the Genotype Analysis of Hepatitis A Virus in Busan
    Sun Hee Park, Chanhee Kim, Summi Lee, Jihye Jeong, Junghye Choi, Seung Ju Lee
    Journal of Bacteriology and Virology.2023; 53(2): 74.     CrossRef
The effect of photodynamic therapy using Radachlorin on biofilm-forming multidrug-resistant bacteria
Choong-Won Seo, Young-Kwon Kim, Jeong-Lib An, Jong-Sook Kim, Pil-Seung Kwon, Young-Bin Yu
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(4):290-297.   Published online August 10, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0150
  • 2,428 View
  • 47 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aimed to test the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) on the inhibition and removal of biofilms containing multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.
Methods
Using multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains, an antibiotic susceptibility test was performed using the Gram-negative identification card of the Vitek 2 system (bioMérieux Inc., France), as well as an analysis of resistance genes, the effects of treatment with a light-emitting diode (LED) array using Radachlorin (RADA-PHARMA Co., Ltd., Russia), and transmission and scanning electron microscopy to confirm the biofilm-inhibitory effect of PDT.
Results
The antibiotic susceptibility test revealed multiple resistance to the antibiotics imipenem and meropenem in the carbapenem class. A class-D–type β-lactamase was found, and OXA-23 and OXA-51 were found in 100% of 15 A. baumannii strains. After PDT using Radachlorin, morphological observations revealed an abnormal structure due to the loss of the cell membrane and extensive morphological changes, including low intracellular visibility and small vacuoles attached to the cell membrane.
Conclusion
PDT involving a combination of LED and Radachlorin significantly eliminated the biofilm of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii. Observations made using electron microscopy showed that PDT combining LED and Radachlorin was effective. Additional studies on the effective elimination of biofilms containing multidrug-resistant bacteria are necessary, and we hope that a treatment method superior to sterilization with antibiotics will be developed in the future.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Photophysical properties of Radachlorin photosensitizer in solutions of different pH, viscosity and polarity
    A.V. Belashov, A.A. Zhikhoreva, I.A. Gorbunova, M.E. Sasin, Sh.S. Shayakhmedov, I.V. Semenova
    Spectrochimica Acta Part A: Molecular and Biomolec.2024; 305: 123480.     CrossRef
  • Applications of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy in Aquaculture: Effect on Fish Pathogenic Bacteria
    Edith Dube, Grace Emily Okuthe
    Fishes.2024; 9(3): 99.     CrossRef
  • Understanding the biofilm development of Acinetobacter baumannii and novel strategies to combat infection
    Naji Naseef Pathoor, Akshaya Viswanathan, Gulshan Wadhwa, Pitchaipillai Sankar Ganesh
    APMIS.2024; 132(5): 317.     CrossRef
  • PDT-Induced Variations of Radachlorin Fluorescence Lifetime in Living Cells In Vitro
    Andrey V. Belashov, Anna A. Zhikhoreva, Anna V. Salova, Tatiana N. Belyaeva, Ilia K. Litvinov, Elena S. Kornilova, Irina V. Semenova
    Photonics.2023; 10(11): 1262.     CrossRef
Review Article
Strategies to combat Gram-negative bacterial resistance to conventional antibacterial drugs: a review
Priyanka Bhowmik, Barkha Modi, Parijat Roy, Antarika Chowdhury
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2023;14(5):333-346.   Published online October 18, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0323
  • 2,736 View
  • 207 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
The emergence of antimicrobial resistance raises the fear of untreatable diseases. Antimicrobial resistance is a multifaceted and dynamic phenomenon that is the cumulative result of different factors. While Gram-positive pathogens, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile, were previously the most concerning issues in the field of public health, Gram-negative pathogens are now of prime importance. The World Health Organization’s priority list of pathogens mostly includes multidrug-resistant Gram-negative organisms particularly carbapenem-resistant Enterobacterales, carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. The spread of Gram-negative bacterial resistance is a global issue, involving a variety of mechanisms. Several strategies have been proposed to control resistant Gram-negative bacteria, such as the development of antimicrobial auxiliary agents and research into chemical compounds with new modes of action. Another emerging trend is the development of naturally derived antibacterial compounds that aim for targets novel areas, including engineered bacteriophages, probiotics, metal-based antibacterial agents, odilorhabdins, quorum sensing inhibitors, and microbiome-modifying agents. This review focuses on the current status of alternative treatment regimens against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, aiming to provide a snapshot of the situation and some information on the broader context.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Efficacy of new generation biosorbents for the sustainable treatment of antibiotic residues and antibiotic resistance genes from polluted waste effluent
    Barkha Madhogaria, Sangeeta Banerjee, Atreyee Kundu, Prasanta Dhak
    Infectious Medicine.2024; 3(1): 100092.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of Plant-Based Silver Nanoparticles for Antioxidant Activity and Promising Wound-Healing Applications
    Maria Qubtia, Shazia Akram Ghumman, Sobia Noreen, Huma Hameed, Shazia Noureen, Rizwana Kausar, Ali Irfan, Pervaiz Akhtar Shah, Hafsa Afzal, Misbah Hameed, Mohammad Raish, Maria Rana, Ajaz Ahmad, Katarzyna Kotwica-Mojzych, Yousef A. Bin Jardan
    ACS Omega.2024; 9(10): 12146.     CrossRef
  • Progress and potentialities in wood extractives-based materials for active food packaging applications
    Eliana I. Fernández Sosa, Nanci Ehman, Fernando E. Felissia, M. Guadalupe Chaves, M. Cristina Area
    Food Bioscience.2024; 60: 104489.     CrossRef

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives