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Original Article
Laboratory investigations of herpes simplex virus-1 and -2 clinical samples in Korea
Eun Ju Oh, Young Sam Yuk, Jae Kyung Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(6):385-389.   Published online December 1, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0146
  • 3,111 View
  • 60 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections have been reported in 60% to 95% of the adult population worldwide, making them one of the most common infectious conditions globally. HSV-1 and HSV-2 cause severe disease in immunocompromised patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide information that could be used to reduce the incidence of genital herpes caused by HSV-1 and HSV-2.
Methods
From September 2018 to December 2020, 59,381 specimens were collected from outpatients across primary and secondary hospitals in Korea who requested U2Bio (Seoul, Korea) to conduct molecular biological testing of their samples for sexually transmitted infections. In this study, the positivity rates of HSV-1 and HSV-2 were analyzed according to age, sex, and specimen type.
Results
In the age-specific analysis of HSV-1, the highest positivity rate (0.58%) was observed in patients under 19 years of age, whereas the lowest positivity rate (0.08%) was observed in patients aged over 70 years. In the age-specific analysis of HSV-2, the highest positivity rate (2.53%) was likewise observed in patients under 19 years of age.
Conclusion
Our study identified differences in the infection rates of HSV-1 and HSV-2 depending on patients’ sex and age. These differences will be useful for improving disease prevention and control measures for HSV-1 and HSV-2.
Review Article
The role of lipids in the pathophysiology of coronavirus infections
Milad Zandi, Parastoo Hosseini, Saber Soltani, Azadeh Rasooli, Mona Moghadami, Sepideh Nasimzadeh, Farzane Behnezhad
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(5):278-285.   Published online October 15, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0153
  • 3,376 View
  • 151 Download
  • 1 Citations
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Coronaviruses, which have been known to cause diseases in animals since the 1930s, utilize cellular components during their replication cycle. Lipids play important roles in viral infection, as coronaviruses target cellular lipids and lipid metabolism to modify their host cells to become an optimal environment for viral replication. Therefore, lipids can be considered as potential targets for the development of antiviral agents. This review provides an overview of the roles of cellular lipids in different stages of the life cycle of coronaviruses.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Orsay Virus Infection of Caenorhabditis elegans Is Modulated by Zinc and Dependent on Lipids
    Luis Alberto Casorla-Perez, Ranya Guennoun, Ciro Cubillas, Bo Peng, Kerry Kornfeld, David Wang, Rebecca Ellis Dutch
    Journal of Virology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Article
Natural Infection with Rabies Virus: A Histopathological and Immunohistochemical Study of Human Brains
Firouzeh Farahtaj, Leila Alizadeh, Alireza Gholami, Alireza Tahamtan, Sadegh Shirian, Maryam Fazeli, Amir Sasan Mozaffari Nejad, Ali Gorji, Hamid Mahmoudzadeh Niknam, Amir Ghaemi
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(1):6-11.   Published online February 28, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.1.03
  • 4,778 View
  • 225 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Despite all the efforts and increased knowledge of rabies, the exact mechanisms of infection and mortality from the rabies virus are not well understood. To understand the mechanisms underlying the pathogenicity of rabies virus infection, it is crucial to study the tissue that the rabies virus naturally infects in humans.

Methods

Cerebellum brain tissue from 9 human post mortem cases from Iran, who had been infected with rabies virus, were examined histopathologically and immunohistochemically to evaluate the innate immune responses against the rabies virus.

Results

Histopathological examination revealed inflammation of the infected cerebellum and immunohistochemical analyses showed an increased immunoreactivity of heat shock protein 70, interleukin-6, interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, caspase-3, caspase-9, toll-like receptor3 and toll-like receptor4 in the infected brain tissue.

Conclusion

These results indicated the involvement of innate immunity in rabies infected human brain tissue, which may aggravate the progression of this deadly disease.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Biosensor as an alternative diagnostic method for rabies virus detection: A literature review
    Milad Zandi, Sajad Zandi, Ramin Mohammadi, Parastoo Hosseini, Samane Teymouri, Saber Soltani, Azadeh Rasouli
    Biotechnology and Applied Biochemistry.2022; 69(4): 1348.     CrossRef
  • Immunohistochemical diagnosis of human infectious diseases: a review
    Hamadou Oumarou Hama, Gérard Aboudharam, Rémi Barbieri, Hubert Lepidi, Michel Drancourt
    Diagnostic Pathology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Rabies Virus-Infected Human and Canine Brains
    Pulleri Kandi Harsha, Sathyanarayanan Ranganayaki, Gowri Yale, Gourav Dey, Kiran K. Mangalaparthi, Anusha Yarlagadda, B. K. Chandrasekhar Sagar, Anita Mahadevan, M. M. Srinivas Bharath, Reeta S. Mani
    Neurochemical Research.2022; 47(6): 1610.     CrossRef
  • A rare fatal case of rabies coexisting with COVID-19
    RabiNarayan Hota, Shalendra Singh, Rakesh Sharma, Pallavi Khandare
    Journal of Acute Disease.2022; 11(3): 129.     CrossRef
  • Enhancement of immune responses by co-stimulation of TLR3 - TLR7 agonists as a potential therapeutics against rabies in mouse model
    Firouzeh Farahtaj, Alireza Gholami, Mohammad Sadeq Khosravy, Safoora Gharibzadeh, Hamid Mahmoudzadeh Niknam, Amir Ghaemi
    Microbial Pathogenesis.2021; 157: 104971.     CrossRef
  • Establishment of Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons—A Promising In Vitro Model for a Molecular Study of Rabies Virus and Host Interaction
    Thanathom Chailangkarn, Nathiphat Tanwattana, Thanakorn Jaemthaworn, Sira Sriswasdi, Nanchaya Wanasen, Sithichoke Tangphatsornruang, Kantinan Leetanasaksakul, Yuparat Jantraphakorn, Wanapinun Nawae, Penpicha Chankeeree, Porntippa Lekcharoensuk, Boonlert L
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2021; 22(21): 11986.     CrossRef
  • Beneficial and Detrimental Effects of Regulatory T Cells in Neurotropic Virus Infections
    Malgorzata Ciurkiewicz, Vanessa Herder, Andreas Beineke
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2020; 21(5): 1705.     CrossRef
  • Characterization of the Th17 profile immune response in cases of human rabies transmitted by dogs and its interference in the disease pathogenesis.
    L.B. Santos, F. Guedes, S.M. Achkar, M.I.S. Duarte, I.S.S. Katz, S.R. Silva, E.R. Fernandes
    Journal of Neuroimmunology.2020; 344: 577263.     CrossRef
  • Quantitative proteomics leads to identify dog brain proteins involved in rabies virus infection: implication in understanding viral pathophysiology
    Suchismita Behera, Rajesh Raghunath Pharande, R. Rajendra Reddy, Sharmila B. Majee, Sandeepan Mukherjee, Amol Ratnakar Suryawanshi
    Journal of Proteins and Proteomics.2020; 11(4): 241.     CrossRef
  • Feral dog bite causing paralytic rabies: Difficult diagnosis and failure of prevention
    Hussein Algahtani, Bader Shirah, Emna Chtourou, Osama Abuhawi, Nawal Abdelghaffar, Mohammad Alshehri
    Saudi Journal for Health Sciences.2020; 9(3): 260.     CrossRef
Brief Report
In Vitro Antiviral Activity of Sakuranetin against Human Rhinovirus 3
Hwa-Jung Choi
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(6):415-420.   Published online December 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.6.09
  • 2,880 View
  • 35 Download
  • 15 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Rhinoviruses (RVs) cause common cold and are associated with exacerbation of chronic inflammatory respiratory diseases. Until now, no clinically effective antiviral chemotherapeutic agents to treat diseases caused by human rhinoviruses (HRVs) have been reported. We assessed the anti-HRV3 activity of sakuranetin isolated from Sorbus commixta Hedl. in human epithelioid carcinoma cervix (HeLa) cells, to evaluate its anti-rhinoviral potential in the clinical setting.

Methods

Antiviral activity and cytotoxicity as well as the effect of sakuranetin on HRV3-induced cytopathic effects (CPEs) were evaluated using the sulforhodamine B (SRB) method using CPE reduction. The morphology of HRV3-infected cells was studied using a light microscope.

Results

Sakuranetin actively inhibited HRV3 replication and exhibited antiviral activity of more than 67% without cytotoxicity in HeLa cells, at 100 μg/mL. Ribavirin showed anti-HRV3 activity similar to that of sakuranetin. Treatment of HRV-infected HeLa cells with sakuranetin visibly reduced CPEs.

Conclusion

The inhibition of HRV production by sakuranetin is mainly due to its general antioxidant activity through inhibition of viral adsorption. Therefore, the antiviral activity of sakuranetin should be further investigated to elucidate its mode of action and prevent HRV3-mediated diseases in pathological conditions.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Sakuranetin and its therapeutic potentials – a comprehensive review
    Md. Junaid, Bristy Basak, Yeasmin Akter, Syeda Samira Afrose, Afsana Nahrin, Rashiduzzaman Emran, Md. Shahinozzaman, Shinkichi Tawata
    Zeitschrift für Naturforschung C.2023; 78(1-2): 27.     CrossRef
  • Comparative metabolomics of flavonoids in twenty vegetables reveal their nutritional diversity and potential health benefits
    Han Tao, Yao Zhao, Linying Li, Yuqing He, Xueying Zhang, Ying Zhu, Gaojie Hong
    Food Research International.2023; 164: 112384.     CrossRef
  • Rice Phytoalexins: Half a Century of Amazing Discoveries; Part I: Distribution, Biosynthesis, Chemical Synthesis, and Biological Activities
    Alessio Valletta, Lorenzo Maria Iozia, Laura Fattorini, Francesca Leonelli
    Plants.2023; 12(2): 260.     CrossRef
  • Antiviral Activity of Quercetin-3-Glucoside Against Non-Polio Enterovirus
    Hwa-Jung Choi
    Journal of Bacteriology and Virology.2022; 52(1): 20.     CrossRef
  • Sakuranetin interacting with cell membranes models: Surface chemistry combined with molecular simulation
    Guilherme Henrique da Cruz Ramos Pires, Vitor Torres Freire, Rafael Guimarães Pereira, Leonardo José Amaral de Siqueira, Eric Umehara, João Henrique Ghilardi Lago, Luciano Caseli
    Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces.2022; 216: 112546.     CrossRef
  • Production of (2S)-sakuranetin from (2S)-naringenin in Escherichia coli by strengthening methylation process and cell resistance
    Qiumeng Sun, Song Gao, Shiqin Yu, Pu Zheng, Jingwen Zhou
    Synthetic and Systems Biotechnology.2022; 7(4): 1117.     CrossRef
  • Sakuranetin State of the Art: Physical Properties, Biological Effects, and Biotechnological Trends
    Leonardo Ribeiro Bernardo, Anna Rafaela Cavalcante Braga
    Industrial Biotechnology.2022; 18(6): 341.     CrossRef
  • Stevia Genus: Phytochemistry and Biological Activities Update
    Jimena Borgo, Laura C. Laurella, Florencia Martini, Cesar A. N. Catalán, Valeria P. Sülsen
    Molecules.2021; 26(9): 2733.     CrossRef
  • Phytochemistry and teratogenic potential of Mimosa tenuiflora (willd.) poir. (Fabaceae) in ruminants: A systematic review
    José Jailson Lima Bezerra, Anderson Angel Vieira Pinheiro, Ricardo Barbosa Lucena
    Toxicon.2021; 195: 78.     CrossRef
  • DO WE KNOW RHINOVIRUSES AND THEIR CLINICAL IMPACT?
    Irina Georgieva, Asya Stoyanova, Svetla Angelova, Savina Stoitsova, Silvia Voleva, Neli Korsun, Lubomira Nikolaeva-Glomb
    PROBLEMS of Infectious and Parasitic Diseases.2021; 49(1): 5.     CrossRef
  • Flavonoids as Antiviral Agents for Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71)
    Salima Lalani, Chit Laa Poh
    Viruses.2020; 12(2): 184.     CrossRef
  • A Review on Sources and Pharmacological Aspects of Sakuranetin
    Monika Stompor
    Nutrients.2020; 12(2): 513.     CrossRef
  • Ethnopharmacologically important but underestimated genus Sorbus: a comprehensive review
    Agnieszka Sołtys, Agnieszka Galanty, Irma Podolak
    Phytochemistry Reviews.2020; 19(2): 491.     CrossRef
  • The Sorbus spp.—Underutilised Plants for Foods and Nutraceuticals: Review on Polyphenolic Phytochemicals and Antioxidant Potential
    Viive Sarv, Petras Rimantas Venskutonis, Rajeev Bhat
    Antioxidants.2020; 9(9): 813.     CrossRef
  • Suppression of influenza B virus replication by sakuranetin and mode of its action
    Dur-Han Kwon, Jeong-Hun Ji, Soon-Ho Yim, Byoung-Soo Kim, Hwa-Jung Choi
    Phytotherapy Research.2018; 32(12): 2475.     CrossRef
Original Article
Seroprevalence of Brucellosis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infected Patients in Hamadan, Iran
Fariba Keramat, Mohammad Mehdi Majzobi, Jalal Poorolajal, Zohreh Zarei Ghane, Maryam Adabi
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(4):282-288.   Published online August 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.4.09
  • 2,568 View
  • 19 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Brucellosis is a systemic disease with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. This study aimed to determine the seroprevalence of brucellosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients in Hamadan Province in the west of Iran.

Methods

A total of 157 HIV-infected patients were screened through standard serological tests, including Wright’s test, Coombs’ Wright test, and 2-mercaptoethanol Brucella agglutination test (2ME test), blood cultures in Castaneda media, and CD4 counting. Data were analyzed using Stata version 11.

Results

Wright and Coombs’ Wright tests were carried out, and only 5 (3.2%) patients had positive serological results. However, all patients had negative 2ME results, and blood cultures were negative for Brucella spp. Moreover, patients with positive serology and a mean CD4 count of 355.8 ± 203.11 cells/μL had no clinical manifestations of brucellosis, and, and the other patients had a mean CD4 count of 335.55 ± 261.71 cells/μL.

Conclusion

Results of this study showed that HIV infection is not a predisposing factor of acquiring brucellosis.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A case of brucellosis concomitant with HIV infection in China
    Shuai-Bing Dong, Li-Ping Wang, Chao-Xue Wu, Fan Li, Yong Yue, Dong-Ri Piao, Hong-Yan Zhao, Hai Jiang
    Infectious Diseases of Poverty.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Investigation of Linc-MAF-4 expression as an effective marker in brucellosis
    Reza Gheitasi, Fariba Keramat, Ghasem Solgi, Mehrdad Hajilooi
    Molecular Immunology.2020; 123: 60.     CrossRef
  • Human Brucellosis: Risks and Prevalence among Iranian Blood Donors Residing in Endemic Areas
    Maryam Zadsar, Mohammad Reza Shirzadi, Mohammad Zeynali, Mahboubeh Rasouli, Gharib Karimi
    Transfusion Medicine and Hemotherapy.2020; 47(2): 103.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and risk factors of brucellosis among febrile patients attending a community hospital in south western Uganda
    Richard Migisha, Dan Nyehangane, Yap Boum, Anne-Laure Page, Amaia Zúñiga-Ripa, Raquel Conde-Álvarez, Fred Bagenda, Maryline Bonnet
    Scientific Reports.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
Brief Report
Evaluation of Antiviral Activity of Zanthoxylum Species Against Picornaviruses
Hwa-Jung Choi
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(6):400-403.   Published online December 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2016.11.003
  • 1,913 View
  • 19 Download
  • 11 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Human rhinoviruses and enteroviruses (family Picornaviridae) infect millions of people worldwide each year, but little is known about effective therapeutical treatment for the infection caused by these viruses. We sought to determine whether or not Zanthoxylum (Rutaceae) species can exhibit antiviral activity against picornaviruses. The leaf parts of four Zanthoxylum species were extracted with methanol, and the extracts were investigated for their antiviral activity against picornaviruses using cytopathic effects by cytopathic effect reduction. Leaf extracts of Zanthoxylum piperitum among four Zanthoxylum species were found to possess only broad-spectrum antipicornavirus activity against human rhninovirus 2 with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 59.48 μg/mL, human rhinovirus 3 with an IC50 value of 39.94 μg/mL, coxsackie A16 virus with an IC50 value of 45.80 μg/mL, coxsackie B3 virus with an IC50 value of 68.53 μg/mL, coxsackie B4 virus with an IC50 value of 93.58 μg/mL, and enterovirus 71 virus with an IC50 value of 4.48 μg/mL. However, ribavirin did not possess antiviral activity against human rhinovirus 3 and four enteroviruses. Therefore, leaves of Z. piperitum showed broad-spectrum antipicornavirus activity, and may be useful as a candidate for studying picornavirus agents and development of pharmaceuticals.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • In silicoinvestigation of spice molecules as potent inhibitor of SARS-CoV-2
    Janmejaya Rout, Bikash Chandra Swain, Umakanta Tripathy
    Journal of Biomolecular Structure and Dynamics.2022; 40(2): 860.     CrossRef
  • In silico, in vitro screening of plant extracts for anti-SARS-CoV-2 activity and evaluation of their acute and sub-acute toxicity
    Damle Latha, Damle Hrishikesh, Ganju Shiban, C Chandrashekar, BR Bharath
    Phytomedicine Plus.2022; 2(2): 100233.     CrossRef
  • Composition, mechanisms of tingling paresthesia, and health benefits of Sichuan pepper: A review of recent progress
    Ngouana Moffo A. Ivane, Suleiman A. Haruna, Marcillinus Zekrumah, Fopa Kue Roméo Elysé, Mohamed Osman Hassan, Sulafa B.H. Hashim, Haroon Elrasheid Tahir, Di Zhang
    Trends in Food Science & Technology.2022; 126: 1.     CrossRef
  • Zanthoxylum Species: A Review of Traditional Uses, Phytochemistry and Pharmacology in Relation to Cancer, Infectious Diseases and Sickle Cell Anemia
    Innocent Uzochukwu Okagu, Joseph Chinedum Ndefo, Emmanuel Chigozie Aham, Chibuike. C. Udenigwe
    Frontiers in Pharmacology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Chemical profiles and screening of potential α-glucosidase inhibitors from Sichuan pepper using ultra-filtration combined with UHPLC-Q-TOF
    Weili Li, Yao Wu, Yushu Liu, Yong Tang, Zhenming Che, Tao Wu
    Industrial Crops and Products.2020; 143: 111874.     CrossRef
  • Compostos químicos isolados de extratos e óleos essenciais do gênero Zanthoxylum Linnaeus (Rutaceae) e seu potencial antimicrobiano
    Daniel Eugenio Saraiva Filho, Josenir Barreto de Sousa, Hélcio Silva dos Santos, Raquel Oliveira dos Santos Fontenelle
    Hoehnea.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Chemical composition, sensory properties and application of Sichuan pepper (Zanthoxylum genus)
    Yue Ji, Shiming Li, Chi-Tang Ho
    Food Science and Human Wellness.2019; 8(2): 115.     CrossRef
  • Immunomodulatory properties of quercetin-3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside from Rapanea melanophloeos against influenza a virus
    Parvaneh Mehrbod, Muna Ali Abdalla, Fatemeh Fotouhi, Masoumeh Heidarzadeh, Abimbola O. Aro, Jacobus N. Eloff, Lyndy J. McGaw, Folorunso O. Fasina
    BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Anti-allergic Inflammatory Effects of the Essential Oil From Fruits of Zanthoxylum coreanum Nakai
    Rui Hong Guo, Jung Up Park, Se Jin Jo, Jae Hun Ahn, Jong Hwan Park, Ji Yoon Yang, Sung Suk Lee, Mi Jin Park, Young Ran Kim
    Frontiers in Pharmacology.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Inhibitory Effects of Essential Oil from Zanthoxylum coreanum Nakai on Melanin Production: Protection Against Re-Pigmentation after Laser Treatment
    Ye-Na Kim, Mi-Jin Park, Zhenlong Zheng, Sung-Suk Lee, Kwang Ho Yoo, Heesu Kim
    Medical Lasers.2018; 7(2): 62.     CrossRef
  • Antiviral effect of compounds derived from Angelica archangelica L. on Herpes simplex virus-1 and Coxsackievirus B3 infections
    Barbara Rajtar, Krystyna Skalicka-Woźniak, Łukasz Świątek, Agnieszka Stec, Anastazja Boguszewska, Małgorzata Polz-Dacewicz
    Food and Chemical Toxicology.2017; 109: 1026.     CrossRef
Original Articles
No Detection of Episomal or Integrated High-Risk Human Papillomavirus in Nonsmall Cell Lung Carcinomas among Korean Population
Jeong Eun Lee, Yong-Moon Lee, In-Ock Seong, Min-Woong Kang, Choong Sik Lee, Kyung-Hee Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(6):356-359.   Published online December 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2016.10.004
  • 2,318 View
  • 20 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
High-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) is known to be a representative cancer-causing agent in the genital and head and neck regions. Many studies have detected hrHPV DNA in nonsmall cell lung carcinoma. However, hrHPV–etiologic correlation in nonsmall cell lung carcinoma remains unclear. This study is designed to determine the prevalence of episomal or integrated hrHPV DNA in nonsmall cell lung carcinoma among the Korean population.
Methods
Surgically resected nonsmall cell lung carcinoma tissues, including 134 cases of squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) and 99 cases of adenocarcinoma (ADC), were examined. In situ hybridization (ISH) for detecting episomal or integrated hrHPV DNA was performed using the INFORM HPV III Family 16 Probe (B) in the Ventana-validated assay. Anyplex II HPV28 detection kit based on real-time polymerase chain reaction was used for HPV DNA detection and genotyping.
Results
All members of the study population were of Korean ethnicity. Episomal or integrated hrHPV DNA ISH analysis result was negative in all 233 cases. One SqCC of 89 samples (42 SqCCs and 47 ADCs) was positive for an hrHPV genotype by Anyplex II HPV28 detection kit.
Conclusion
Our finding did not demonstrate hrHPV–etiologic correlation in primary lung SqCC and ADC in the Korean population.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • HPV and lung cancer: A systematic review and meta‐analysis
    Julia Karnosky, Wolfgang Dietmaier, Helge Knuettel, Viola Freigang, Myriam Koch, Franziska Koll, Florian Zeman, Christian Schulz
    Cancer Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Presence and activity of HPV in primary lung cancer
    Talita Helena Araujo de Oliveira, Carolina Medeiros do Amaral, Bianca de França São Marcos, Kamylla Conceição Gomes Nascimento, Ana Carine de Miranda Rios, Dafne Carolina Alves Quixabeira, Maria Tereza Cartaxo Muniz, Jacinto da Costa Silva Neto, Antonio C
    Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology.2018; 144(12): 2367.     CrossRef
Trends and Characteristics of HIV Infection among Suspected Tuberculosis Cases in Public Health Centers in Korea: 2001–2013
Meekyung Kee, Kyoung-Ho Lee, Sae-Young Lee, Chun Kang, Chaeshin Chu
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(Suppl):S37-S42.   Published online December 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.11.002
  • 2,109 View
  • 16 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The Republic of Korea reports approximately 35,000 new tuberculosis (TB) patients each year, and the number of HIV-infected individuals is steadily increasing. Public health centers (PHCs) conduct TB diagnosis and treatment for risk groups in communities. This study aimed to identify possible trends and characteristics of HIV infection among suspected TB cases in PHCs.
Methods
Study subjects were suspected TB cases in PHCs who agreed to be tested for HIV from 2001 to 2013. Trends in HIV seroprevalence were assessed through a series of annual cross-sectional analyses. We analyzed suspected TB cases, and HIV-infected individuals among suspected TB cases, by gender, age, nationality, and region.
Results
The number of suspected tuberculosis cases who took an HIV test in PHCs was approximately 6,000 each year from 2001 to 2013. Among the suspected TB cases who took an HIV test, the number of those aged 20–39 is gradually decreasing, while the number of those aged 50–69 is increasing. During this period, 32 HIV-infected individuals were identified; the majority were men (94%), aged 30–49 (68%), Korean (94%), and residents in a metropolitan area (53%). HIV seroprevalence decreased from 8.2 per 10,000 persons in 2001 to 1.9 per 10,000 persons in 2013.
Conclusion
This study has identified trends and characteristics of HIV infection among suspected tuberculosis cases in PHCs. This national data provides a basis for public health policy for HIV and tuberculosis infections.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Is Tuberculosis Still the Number One Infectious Disease in Korea?
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2014; 5: S1.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Acute Human Cytomegalovirus Infection with Bleeding in Iran
Behzad Pourhossein, Farhad Yaghmaei, Saber Esmaeili, Omid Banafshi, Shahla Afrasiabian, Mohammad Reza Shirzadi, Mark Schleiss, Ehsan Mostafavi
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(6):383-386.   Published online December 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.10.003
  • 1,762 View
  • 24 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
In December 2011, a 42-year-old male farmer was admitted to a hospital in Sanandaj (Western Iran) with fever and anemia in order to check whether he suffered from some infectious diseases. During the first 3 days after admission, the patient gradually developed progressive oliguria, fever, abdominal pain in the right upper quadrant, leukocytosis with toxic granulation, petechiae and ecchymosis, oral bleeding, and vomiting. The sonographic findings revealed splenomegaly and an increase in the thickness of the gall bladder wall. In order to manage the patient and taking into consideration the most probable differential diagnoses, diagnostic tests were performed on two blood samples collected from him, and real-time polymerase chain reaction for human cytomegalovirus was positive.
Original Articles
In Vitro Antibacterial Activity, Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Woodfordia fruticosa Kurz. Leaf Extract and Host Toxicity Testing With In Vitro Cultured Lymphocytes From Human Umbilical Cord Blood
Debasmita Dubey, Rajashree Patnaik, Goutam Ghosh, Rabindra N. Padhy
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(5):298-312.   Published online October 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.08.001
  • 2,044 View
  • 23 Download
  • 14 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
To locate a plant with suitable phytochemicals for use as antimicrobial agents to control multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria as a complementary medicine, without host toxicity as monitored through cultured lymphocytes from human umbilical cord blood.
Methods
The methanol crude leaf extract of the plant Woodfordia fruticosa was subjected to antimicrobial assay in vitro with nine pathogenic MDR bacteria from clinical samples. This was followed by bioassay-guided fractionation with seven non-polar to polar solvents, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis of the n-butanol fraction, and monitoring of the host toxicity of the leaf extract with in vitro grown lymphocytes from human umbilical cord blood.
Results
The leaf extract of W. fruticosa had a controlling capacity for MDR bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of the n-butanol fraction were < 1.89 mg/mL extract and 9.63 mg/mL extract, respectively. The gas chromatography–mass spectrometry spectrum of the n-butanol fraction confirmed the presence of 13 peaks of different compounds with retention times of 9.11 minutes, 9.72 minutes, 10.13 minutes, 10.78 minutes, 12.37 minutes, 12.93 minutes, 18.16 minutes, 21.74 minutes, 21.84 minutes, 5.96 minutes, 12.93 minutes, 24.70 minutes, and 25.76 minutes. The six leading compounds were: diethyl phthalate: IUPAC name: diethyl benzene-1,2-dicarboxylate; 5-methyl-2-(1-methylethyl) phenol: IUPAC name: 5-methyl-2-propan-2-ylphenol; (E )-3,7-dimethylocta-2,6-diene-1-thiol: IUPAC name: (2Z)-3,7-dimethylocta-2,6-diene-1-thiol; 2,6,10-dodecatrien-1-ol, 3,7,11-trimethyl-, (E,E ): IUPAC name: 2,6,10-dodecatrien-1-ol; 3,7,11-trimethyl-, (E,E); 2-methoxy-4-(2-propenyl) phenol: IUPAC name: 2-methoxy-4-[(1E)-prop-1-en-1-yl]phenol; hexadecanoic acid: IUPAC name: hexadecanoic acid.
Conclusion
The presence of antimicrobial compounds that are therapeutically potent against MDR bacteria was confirmed in W. fruticosa. The crude leaf extract showed no host toxicity with human lymphocytes; the n-butanol fraction of the extract was the most suitable bioactive fraction. The terpenes isolated were: 5-methyl-2-(1-methylethyl) phenol, 2-methoxy-4-(2-propenyl) phenol, 2,6-octadien-1-ol, 3,7-dimethyl-(E)-2,6-octadienal, 3,7-dimethylcyclohexanol, and cyclohexanol, 2-methylene-5-(1-methylethenyl) which were reported to have specifically antimicrobial activity.

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Role of Active and Inactive Cytotoxic Immune Response in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Dynamics
Hernan Dario Toro Zapata, Angelica Graciela Caicedo Casso, Derdei Bichara, Sunmi Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(1):3-8.   Published online February 28, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.01.001
  • 2,109 View
  • 25 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Mathematical models can be helpful to understand the complex dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus infection within a host. Most of work has studied the interactions of host responses and virus in the presence of active cytotoxic immune cells, which decay to zero when there is no virus. However, recent research highlights that cytotoxic immune cells can be inactive but never be depleted.
Methods
We propose a mathematical model to investigate the human immunodeficiency virus dynamics in the presence of both active and inactive cytotoxic immune cells within a host. We explore the impact of the immune responses on the dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus infection under different disease stages.
Results
Standard mathematical and numerical analyses are presented for this new model. Specifically, the basic reproduction number is computed and local and global stability analyses are discussed.
Conclusion
Our results can give helpful insights when designing more effective drug schedules in the presence of active and inactive immune responses.

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    John G. Alford, Stephen A. McCoy
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    Hernán Darío Toro-Zapata, Carlos Andrés Trujillo-Salazar, Edwin Mauricio Carranza-Mayorga
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    Hernán Toro-Zapata, Angélica Caicedo-Casso, Sunmi Lee
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    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
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    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
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Articleses
National Biobank of Korea: Quality control Programs of Collected-human Biospecimens
Jae-Eun Lee, Ji-Hyun Kim, Eun-Jung Hong, Hye Sook Yoo, Hye-Young Nam, Ok Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2012;3(3):185-189.   Published online June 30, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2012.07.007
  • 1,982 View
  • 15 Download
  • 16 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Personalized medicine is emerging as a main paradigm for risk prediction, pre-diagnosis, and effective prevention and treatment of disease. A large number of human biospecimens and their clinical data are essential resources for the success of personalized medicine as well as other biomedical research. The National Biobank of Korea (NBK) has collected well-annotated and high quality human biospecimens, and distributes them to the Korean biomedical scientists, through the Korea Biobank Project (KBP). The ultimate goal of NBK activities is to promote biomedical research and public health. As of December- 2011, the NBK has collected various human biospecimens from 525,416 participants including 325,952 Korean populations and 199,464 patients. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the KBP and quality control programs for collection of human biospecimens with high quality of NBK.

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Phylogenetic Analysis of the Rotavirus Genotypes Originated from Children < 5 Years of Age in 16 Cities in South Korea, between 2000 and 2004
Ho-Kyung Oh, Seung-Hwa Hong, Byung-Yoon Ahn, Hye-Kyoung Min
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2012;3(1):36-42.   Published online December 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2012.01.006
  • 1,942 View
  • 16 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The purpose of this study was to examine the diversity of the G and P types of human rotavirus strains isolated in South Korea during 2000 to 2004.
Methods
We selected 38 Group A rotavirus isolates among 652 fecal samples, which were collected from infants and children < 5 years of age with acute gastroenteritis or diarrhea admitted in 8 hospitals representative of five provinces of South Korea between 2000 and 2004. Rotavirus P- and G-genotypes were determined by nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis was performed.
Results
One G1P[4] consisted G1-Id-P[4]-V; one G1P[6] consisted G1-Id-P[6]-Ia; nine G1P[8] consisted G1-Ib-P[8]-Ia (n=3), G1-Ic-P[8]-Ia (n=1), and G1-Id-P[8]-Ia (n=5); 13 G2P[4] consisted G2-V-P[4]-V; two G3P[4] consisted G3-IIId-P[4]-V; five G3P[8] consisted G3-IIId-P[8]-Ia; four G4P[6] consisted G4-Ie-P[6]-Ia; two G4P[8] consisted G4-Ie-P[8]-II; one G9P[6] consisted G9-III-P[6]-Ia.
Conclusions
A considerable amount of rotavirus genotypic diversity was detected in South Korea from 2000 to 2004. These findings are important to develop the effective vaccines and to undertake epidemiologic studies.

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Study on the Correlation of Premises Condition Index and the Presence of Larvae of Aedes Species Mosquitoes in Human Dwellings of the Cuddalore District of Tamil Nadu, India
Parasuraman Basker, Radhakrishnan Ezhil
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2012;3(1):3-7.   Published online December 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.11.046
  • 1,888 View
  • 12 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Conclusions It is concluded that this study helps in conducting rapid survey to identify the presence of Aedes larvae with a minimum number of staff for both inspection and treatment of Aedes larvae during the epidemic situation. Objectives To predict dwellings for the presence of Aedes larvae rapidly based on Premises Condition Index (PCI) factors, we studied the possible presence of Aedes species mosquitoes larvae among houses in the Chidambaram urban of Cuddalore District in Tamil Nadu, India based on the scores of variables in PCI, namely House, Yard and degree of shadow. Data of these variables were collected in September and October 2006 from 1813 houses in the Chidambaram urban area during the intensive vector control activities employed for the prevention and control of Chikungunya.
Methods
The association between presence of larvae and the variables of PCI was tested by Chi-square and Correlation. The predictability of the presence of Aedes larvae based on PCI factors was computed by logistic regression.
Results
The study shows 301 containers in 132 houses were found positive with Aedes species out of 1813 houses surveyed. It was further observed that the probability of presence of positive premises was four times higher in the premises with 75% shadow compared with premises with a 25% shadow. These findings showed a significant association (p < 0.001) with positive premises.

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    Jenna E. Forsyth, Francis M. Mutuku, Lydiah Kibe, Luti Mwashee, Joyce Bongo, Chika Egemba, Nicole M. Ardoin, A. Desiree LaBeaud, Roberto Barrera
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    Pablo Manrique-Saide, Clive R Davies, Paul G Coleman, Azael Che-Mendoza, Felipe Dzul-Manzanilla, Mario Barrera-Pérez, Silvia Hernández-Betancourt, Guadalupe Ayora-Talavera, Miguel Pinkus-Rendón, Pierre Burciaga-Zúñiga, Gustavo Sánchez Tejeda, Juan I Arred
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Brief Report
Registration of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines: Korea, 2010
Ji-Yoon Lee, Dae-Yeon Lee, Young-Sil Choi, Kyoung-Jae Lee, Yong-Ou Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(2):141-147.   Published online June 30, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.07.002
  • 1,948 View
  • 13 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
In an effort to increase the credibility of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines established in Korea, obligatory registration was introduced by the Bioethics and Safety Act 2008, effective as of January 1, 2010.The DNA fingerprint, chromosome stability, expression of pluripotency markers, and contamination of mycoplasma of the submitted lines were analyzed by Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC). The characterization data and ethical aspects, such as informed consent for donation of surplus embryos, were reviewed by a 10-member advisory review committee for stem cell registry.A total of 55 domestic hESC lines were submitted for registration in 2010; among them 51 were registered. Among these submitted lines, 26 were additionally characterized by KCDC, while 25 lines previously characterized by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology were not additionally analyzed by KCDC.Registration completed an oversight system for embryo research by registering the products of licensed embryo research projects, making embryo research more transparent in Korea. Information about hESC lines is available at the website of the Korea Stem Cell Registry (kscr.nih.go.kr).

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    Stefanie Seltmann, Fritz Lekschas, Robert Müller, Harald Stachelscheid, Marie-Sophie Bittner, Weiping Zhang, Luam Kidane, Anna Seriola, Anna Veiga, Glyn Stacey, Andreas Kurtz
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PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives