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Volume 4(3); June 2013
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Editorial
Years of Epidemics (2009–2011): Pandemic Influenza and Foot-and-Mouth Disease Epidemic in Korea
Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(3):125-126.   Published online June 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.05.001
  • 1,765 View
  • 19 Download
  • 1 Citations
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Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Global Foot-and-Mouth Disease Research Update and Gap Analysis: 2 - Epidemiology, Wildlife and Economics
    T. J. D. Knight-Jones, L. Robinson, B. Charleston, L. L. Rodriguez, C. G. Gay, K. J. Sumption, W. Vosloo
    Transboundary and Emerging Diseases.2016; 63: 14.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Estimation of the Infection Window for the 2010/2011 Korean Foot-and-Mouth Disease Outbreak
Hachung Yoon, Soon-Seek Yoon, Han Kim, Youn-Ju Kim, Byounghan Kim, Sung-Hwan Wee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(3):127-132.   Published online June 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.04.010
  • 1,871 View
  • 14 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aims to develop a method for calculating infection time lines for disease outbreaks on farms was developed using the 2010/2011 foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) epidemic in the Republic of Korea.
Methods
Data on farm demography, the detection date of FMD, the clinical history for the manifestation of lesions, the presence of antibodies against FMD virus (including antibodies against the structural and nonstructural proteins of serotype O), vaccination status (O1 Manisa strain), the number of reactors and information on the slaughter of infected animals were utilized in this method.
Results
Based on estimates of the most likely infection date, a cumulative detection probability that an infected farm would be identified on a specific day was determined. Peak infection was observed between late December and early January, but peak detection occurred in mid-January. The early detection probability was highest for pigs, followed by cattle (dairy, then beef) and small ruminants. Nearly 90% of the infected pig farms were detected by Day 11 post-infection while 13 days were required for detection for both dairy and beef cattle farms, and 21 days were necessary for small ruminant (goat and deer) farms. On average, 8.1 ± 3.1 days passed prior to detecting the presence of FMD virus on a farm. The interval between infection and detection of FMD was inversely associated with the intensity of farming.
Conclusion
The results of our study emphasize the importance of intensive clinical inspection, which is the quickest method of detecting FMD infection and minimizing the damage caused by an epidemic.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Meta-Population Model of Potential Foot-and-Mouth Disease Transmission, Clinical Manifestation, and Detection Within U.S. Beef Feedlots
    Aurelio H. Cabezas, Michael W. Sanderson, Victoriya V. Volkova
    Frontiers in Veterinary Science.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Probabilistic assessment of potential leachate leakage from livestock mortality burial pits: A supervised classification approach using a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) fitted to a groundwater quality monitoring dataset
    Hyun-Koo Kim, Kyoung-Ho Kim, Seong-Taek Yun, Junseop Oh, Ho-Rim Kim, Sun-Hwa Park, Moon-Su Kim, Tae-Seung Kim
    Process Safety and Environmental Protection.2019; 129: 326.     CrossRef
  • Using Simulated Annealing to Improve the Information Dissemination Network Structure of a Foreign Animal Disease Outbreak Response
    James D. Pleuss, Jessica L. Heier Stamm, Jason D. Ellis
    Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Managem.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Managing complexity: Simplifying assumptions of foot-and-mouth disease models for swine
    A. C. Kinsley, K. VanderWaal, M. E. Craft, R. B. Morrison, A. M. Perez
    Transboundary and Emerging Diseases.2018; 65(5): 1307.     CrossRef
  • A study on the spread of the foot-and-mouth disease in Korea in 2010/2011
    Jihyun Hwang, Changhyuck Oh
    Journal of the Korean Data and Information Science.2014; 25(2): 271.     CrossRef
  • Summing Up Again
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2014; 5(4): 177.     CrossRef
  • Atmospheric pathway: A possibility of continuous outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease in South Korea in 2010–2011
    Prueksakorn Kritana, Kim Taehyeung, Kim Hyeontae, Kim Ki Youn, Son Wongeun
    Computers and Electronics in Agriculture.2014; 108: 95.     CrossRef
  • Journal Publishing: Never Ending Saga
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2014; 5(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Roll the Dice
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2014; 5(5): 243.     CrossRef
  • Years of Epidemics (2009–2011): Pandemic Influenza and Foot-and-Mouth Disease Epidemic in Korea
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2013; 4(3): 125.     CrossRef
Multiplex Real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction Assays for Simultaneous Detection of Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus
Jie Yeun Park, Semi Jeon, Jun Young Kim, Misun Park, Seonghan Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(3):133-139.   Published online June 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.04.004
  • 2,160 View
  • 22 Download
  • 15 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
A multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was developed for the identification of three Vibrio species: Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus.
Methods
Specific primers and probes targeting the hlyA, tlh, and vvhA genes were selected and used for multiplex real-time PCR to confirm the identification of V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus, respectively. This method was applied to screen Vibrio species from environmental samples and combining it with a culture-based method, its effectiveness was evaluated in comparison with culture-based methods alone.
Results
Specific PCR fragments were obtained from isolates belonging to the target species, indicating a high specificity of this multiplex real-time PCR. No cross-reactivity with the assay was observed between the tested bacteria. The sensitivity of the multiplex real-time PCR was found to have a lower limit of 104 colony-forming units/reaction for all three Vibrio species. The combination strategy raised the isolation ratio of all three Vibrio species 1.26- to 2.75-fold.
Conclusion
This assay provides a rapid, sensitive, and specific technique to detect these three Vibrio species in the environment.

Citations

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  • Current trends in polymerase chain reaction based detection of three major human pathogenic vibrios
    Sharmin Quazi Bonny, M. A. Motalib Hossain, Syed Muhammad Kamal Uddin, Thiruchelvi Pulingam, Suresh Sagadevan, Mohd Rafie Johan
    Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition.2022; 62(5): 1317.     CrossRef
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    Feng Yang, Limei Xu, Wanzhen Huang, Fang Li
    Aquaculture.2022; 548: 737605.     CrossRef
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    Duanduan Chen, Leifeng Guo, Cao Yi, Shouquan Wang, Yuanyuan Ru, Hui Wang
    Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety.2021; 217: 112266.     CrossRef
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    Lingzhi Li, Hongmei Meng, Dan Gu, Yang Li, Mengdie Jia
    Microbiological Research.2019; 222: 43.     CrossRef
  • Application of digital PCR and next generation sequencing in the etiology investigation of a foodborne disease outbreak caused by Vibrio parahaemolyticus
    Ying Li, Shuang Zhang, Jie Li, Meiling Chen, Mu He, Yuanyuan Wang, Yanchun Zhang, Hongbo Jing, Hongmei Ma, Yindong Li, Lin Zhao, Hongqun Zhao, Biao Kan, Bo Pang
    Food Microbiology.2019; 84: 103233.     CrossRef
  • Cholera Outbreak due to Raw Seafood Consumption in South Korea, 2016
    Jeong Hyun Kim, Jin Lee, Sahyun Hong, Sangwon Lee, Hae-young Na, Young-Il Jeong, Eun Jin Choi, Junyoung Kim, Hyo Sun Kawk, Enhi Cho
    The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygi.2018; 99(1): 168.     CrossRef
  • Detection and differentiation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus by multiplexed real-time PCR
    Deshun Xu, Lei Ji, Xiaofang Wu, Wei Yan, Liping Chen
    Canadian Journal of Microbiology.2018; 64(11): 809.     CrossRef
  • Development of a rapid PCR protocol to detect Vibrio parahaemolyticus in clams
    Sara Federici, Diana I. Serrazanetti, M. Elisabetta Guerzoni, Raffaella Campana, Eleonora Ciandrini, Wally Baffone, Andrea Gianotti
    Journal of Food Science and Technology.2018; 55(2): 749.     CrossRef
  • First Case of Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Skermanella aerolata Infection Mimicking Vibrio Sepsis
    Sang Taek Heo, Ki Tae Kwon, Jeong Rae Yoo, Ji Young Choi, Keun Hwa Lee, Kwan Soo Ko
    Annals of Laboratory Medicine.2018; 38(6): 604.     CrossRef
  • Vibrio cholerae O1 with Reduced Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin and Azithromycin Isolated from a Rural Coastal Area of Bangladesh
    Shah M. Rashed, Nur A. Hasan, Munirul Alam, Abdus Sadique, Marzia Sultana, Md. Mozammel Hoq, R. Bradley Sack, Rita R. Colwell, Anwar Huq
    Frontiers in Microbiology.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A label-free multi-functionalized graphene oxide based electrochemiluminscence immunosensor for ultrasensitive and rapid detection of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in seawater and seafood
    Yuhong Sha, Xuan Zhang, Wenrou Li, Wei Wu, Sui Wang, Zhiyong Guo, Jun Zhou, Xiurong Su
    Talanta.2016; 147: 220.     CrossRef
  • Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 in vegetables and fish raised in wastewater irrigated fields and stabilization ponds during a non-cholera outbreak period in Morogoro, Tanzania: an environmental health study
    Yaovi M. G. Hounmanou, Robinson H. Mdegela, Tamègnon V. Dougnon, Ofred J. Mhongole, Edward S. Mayila, Joseph Malakalinga, George Makingi, Anders Dalsgaard
    BMC Research Notes.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Isolation of Vibrio vulnificus Biotype I from Disease Outbreaks on Cultured Tiger Grouper Epinephelus fuscoguttatus Forsskal, 1775
    Jumroensri Thawonsuwan, Jiraporn Kasornchandra, Patcharee Soonsan, Chantana Keawtapee
    Fish Pathology.2016; 51(Special-is): S39.     CrossRef
  • Detection of Vibrio cholerae by isothermal cross-priming amplification combined with nucleic acid detection strip analysis
    Xia Zhang, Xin-Jun Du, Chun Guan, Ping Li, Wen-Jie Zheng, Shuo Wang
    Molecular and Cellular Probes.2015; 29(4): 208.     CrossRef
  • lolB gene, a valid alternative for qPCR detection of Vibrio cholerae in food and environmental samples
    Alejandro Garrido-Maestu, María-José Chapela, Juan M. Vieites, Ana G. Cabado
    Food Microbiology.2015; 46: 535.     CrossRef
Impacts of Heavy Rain and Typhoon on Allergic Disease
Kwan Jun Park, Jong Youn Moon, Jong Sik Ha, Sun Duk Kim, Bok Yang Pyun, Taek Ki Min, Yoon Hyung Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(3):140-145.   Published online June 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.04.009
  • 1,791 View
  • 12 Download
  • 11 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Allergic disease may be increased by climate change. Recent reports have shown that typhoon and heavy rain increase allergic disease locally by concentration of airborne allergens of pollen, ozone, and fungus, which are causes of allergic disease. The objective of this study was to determine whether typhoon and heavy rain increase allergic disease in Korea.
Methods
This study included allergic disease patients of the area declared as a special disaster zone due to storms and heavy rains from 2003 to 2009. The study used information from the Korea Meteorological Administration, and from the National Health Insurance Service for allergic diseases (asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis).
Results
During a storm period, the numbers of allergy rhinitis and atopic dermatitis outpatients increased [rate ratio (RR) = 1.191; range, 1.150–1.232] on the sixth lag day. However, the number of asthma outpatients decreased (RR = 0.900; range, 0.862–0.937) on the sixth lag day after a disaster period. During a storm period, the numbers of allergic rhinitis outpatients (RR = 1.075; range, 1.018–1.132) and atopy outpatients increased (RR = 1.134; range, 1.113–1.155) on the seventh lag day. However, the number of asthma outpatients decreased to RR value of 0.968 (range, 0.902–1.035) on the fifth lag day.
Conclusion
This study suggests that typhoon and heavy rain increase allergic disease apart from asthma. More study is needed to explain the decrease in asthma.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Temporal Variation and Factors Associated with Allergic Rhinitis in a Cohort of Rural Preschool Children from Sri Lanka
    Shashanka Rajapakse, Lakmali Amarasiri, Duminda Yasaratne, Janith Warnasekara, Suneth Agampodi
    Journal of Tropical Pediatrics.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effects of mite allergen avoidance in children in two distant towns in Japan
    C. Oshikata, M. Watanabe, K. Hashimoto, A. Yamazaki, N. Kobayashi, R. Konuma, M. Ishida, S. Kobayashi, T. Shimada, T. Kaneko, Y. Kamata, S. Kuriyama, S. Kure, M. Yanai, N. Tsurikisawa
    Revue Française d'Allergologie.2022; 62(8): 661.     CrossRef
  • Emergency room visits for childhood atopic dermatitis are associated with floods?
    Nai-Tzu Chen, Mu-Jean Chen, Chih-Da Wu, Yue Leon Guo
    Science of The Total Environment.2021; 773: 145435.     CrossRef
  • Emergency department visits associated with satellite observed flooding during and following Hurricane Harvey
    Balaji Ramesh, Meredith A. Jagger, Benjamin Zaitchik, Korine N. Kolivras, Samarth Swarup, Lauren Deanes, Julia M. Gohlke
    Journal of Exposure Science & Environmental Epidem.2021; 31(5): 832.     CrossRef
  • Emergency management of reservoirs and water treatment plants in typhoon season: a case study of Ningbo
    Wei Chen, Xiaozhong Zhang, Zhengxie Zhou, Jianrong He, Hui Tao, Zhigang Liu
    Chinese Journal of Population Resources and Enviro.2018; 16(4): 364.     CrossRef
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    Rebeca de Jesus Crespo, Richard Fulford
    International Journal of Public Health.2018; 63(1): 81.     CrossRef
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    Dell D. Saulnier, Kim Brolin Ribacke, Johan von Schreeb
    Prehospital and Disaster Medicine.2017; 32(5): 568.     CrossRef
  • Exposure to ambient bioaerosols is associated with allergic skin diseases in Greater Taipei residents
    Kraiwuth Kallawicha, Ying-Chih Chuang, Shih-Chun Candice Lung, Bor-Cheng Han, Yi-Fang Ting, Hsing Jasmine Chao
    Environmental Pollution.2016; 216: 845.     CrossRef
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    Chiung-Ting Chang
    Environmental Hazards.2016; 15(2): 178.     CrossRef
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    Ruihua Kang, Huanmiao Xun, Ying Zhang, Wei Wang, Xin Wang, Baofa Jiang, Wei Ma, Yongchang Cao
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  • The Correlation between the Blood Sugar and Allergy of the Trauma Patient
    Jeong Soo Lee, Sung Hee Hyun, Ji-Sook Lee, In Sik Kim
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Development of a Diagnostic Kit to Detect Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia
Hyeng-Il Cheun, Byung-Suk Chung, Da-Won Ma, Bo-La Goo, Shin-Hyeong Cho, Mi-jung Ji, Won-Ja Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(3):146-151.   Published online June 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.04.006
  • 2,263 View
  • 18 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aims to develop a high-sensitivity antibody diagnostic kit that will enable a rapid and accurate detection of Cryptospofidium parvum and Giardia lamblia in patients with diarrhea.
Methods
The cultivated C. parvum oocysts and G. lamblia cysts in each calf and dog were injected to mice to obtain antibodies, which were titrated. Spleen cells of the immunized mouse were separated and blended with myelomas to produce hybrid cell lines that form monoclonal antibodies. Using ELISA method, antibodies that specifically respond to C. parvum and G.lamblia were then selected. The cells were injected into the abdominal cavity of a BALB/c mouse to isolate hydrops abdominis containing high level of antibodies. The IgG antibody was purified using protein G gel.
Results
The detection limit of monoclonal antibodies for Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia was 125 oocysts/mL and 1250 cysts/mL, respectively. In addition, during testing they did not show cross-reactivity to viruses (n = 15), bacteria (n =17), and parasites (n = 9).
Conclusion
The rapid diagnostic antibody kit developed in this study, which specifically responds to C. parvum and G. lamblia, will be useful in detecting and monitoring diarrheal infections.

Citations

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  • Comprehensive review of conventional and state-of-the-art detection methods of Cryptosporidium
    George Luka, Ehsan Samiei, Nishat Tasnim, Arash Dalili, Homayoun Najjaran, Mina Hoorfar
    Journal of Hazardous Materials.2022; 421: 126714.     CrossRef
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    Eman M. Hassan, Banu Örmeci, Maria C. DeRosa, Brent R. Dixon, Syed A. Sattar, Asma Iqbal
    Water Science and Technology.2021; 83(1): 1.     CrossRef
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    Laura Sutarlie, Sian Yang Ow, Xiaodi Su
    Biotechnology Journal.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Mark S Riddle, Herbert L DuPont, Bradley A Connor
    American Journal of Gastroenterology.2016; 111(5): 602.     CrossRef
  • Multiplex-Touchdown PCR to Simultaneously Detect Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, and Cyclospora cayetanensis, the Major Causes of Traveler’s Diarrhea
    Ji-Hun Shin, Sang-Eun Lee, Tong Soo Kim, Da-Won Ma, Jong-Yil Chai, Eun-Hee Shin
    The Korean Journal of Parasitology.2016; 54(5): 631.     CrossRef
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    Raul V. Destura, Rohani B. Cena, Ma. Jowina H. Galarion, Coleen M. Pangilinan, Geraldine M. Arevalo, Ryan Oliver C. Alba, Joy Ann G. Petronio, Gielenny M. Salem, Brian Schwem, Jesus Emmanuel A. D. Sevilleja
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Study on Entomological Surveillance and its Significance during a Dengue Outbreak in the District of Tirunelveli in Tamil Nadu, India
Parasuraman Basker, Pichai Kannan, Rajagopal Thirugnanasambandam Porkaipandian, Sivsankaran Saravanan, Subramaniam Sridharan, Mahaligam Kadhiresan
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(3):152-158.   Published online June 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.04.005
  • 2,003 View
  • 16 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
To study the significance of entomological surveillance, the house index (HI), container index (CI), and Breteau index (BI) were determined to estimate the degree of a major dengue outbreak in Tirunelveli, Tamil Nadu, India (Latitude: 8°42′N; Longitude: 77°42′E) in May 2012.
Methods
The HI, CI, and BI were determined in a primary health center (PHC) in the village of Maruthamputhur (Pappakudi taluk, Tirunelveli) by carrying out an antilarval (AL) work that involved door-to-door search for immature stages of Aedes spp. mosquitoes by trained field workers and volunteers. The work of field workers was evaluated by a junior and senior entomologist the following day.
Results
Before the AL work, the reported numbers of fever cases from Week 1 to 5 in Maruthamputhur were 211, 394, 244, 222, and 144 with two deaths. By contrast, after the AL work, these numbers were considerably reduced and there was no fever-related death (the HI was reduced from 48.2% to 1.6%, the CI from 28.6% to 0.4%, and the BI from 48.2 to 1.6).
Conclusion
Because no specific medicine and vaccines are available to treat dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever, entomological surveillance and its significance can be used to halt the outbreak of dengue as shown in this study.

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    A. Sajeli Begum, Swati Alok, Samrun Nessa
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    Joseph R. Biggs, Ava Kristy Sy, Katharine Sherratt, Oliver J. Brady, Adam J. Kucharski, Sebastian Funk, Mary Anne Joy Reyes, Mary Ann Quinones, William Jones-Warner, Ferchito L. Avelino, Nemia L. Sucaldito, Amado O. Tandoc, Eva Cutiongco-de la Paz, Maria
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Brief Reports
Epidemiological Characteristics of Imported Shigellosis in Korea, 2010–2011
Hee-Jung Kim, Seung-Ki Youn, Sangwon Lee, Yeon Hwa Choi
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(3):159-165.   Published online June 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.02.002
  • 2,099 View
  • 17 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Shigellosis is a global disease as food poisoning by infection of Shigella spp (S. dysenteriae, S. flexneri, S. boydii and S. sonnei). In Korea, approximately 500 cases of shigellosis have reported every year since 2004, and imported shigellosis is increasing gradually from 2006 in particular. According to increase of numbers of overseas travelers, the numbers of patients diseased with imported shigellosis is also increasing. We need continuous surveillance studies network (SSN) for control of imported shigellosis. We studied epidemiological characteristic of imported shigellosis by using database of Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC) from 2010 to 2011. The imported shigellosis is analyzed on correlation with variable factors such as sex, age, symptom, visited country as well as Shigella spp in the database. Total 399 patients diseased with shigellosis have been reported between 2010 and 2011, The 212 patients (53.1%) among them were disease with imported shigellosis and the 205 patients (96.7%) were diagnosed as definite shigellosis. Shigella sonnei (65.6%) and Shigella flexneri (20.3%) were isolated in order. Clinical symptoms of the shigellosis were diarrhea (96.5%), abdominal pain (54.7%), fever (52.8%), chill (31.6%), and weakness (21.7% etc) in order. Duration of diarrhea was 1 to 5 days, the number of diarrhea was mostly more than 10 times, and type of stool was almost yellow stool. Almost shigellosis was occurred in the travelers visited to Asia (98.1%). Particularly, the occurrence rate of shigellosis was highest in traveler visited to Southeast Asia which is India (21.7%), Cambodia (19.8%), Philippines (17.9%), and Vietnam (9.0%) in order. According to increase of traveler to Southeast Asia, imported Shigellosis also increased. We need to strengthen the public health and hygiene, which is infection prevention rules, eating properly-cook food, washing hands, drinking boiled water, for traveler to Asia. The quarantine and surveillance system to control imported shigellosis is need continually in Korea.

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    Devendra Singh, Vishnu Agarwal
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    Hyunjoo Pai
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    Young-June Choe, Seung-Ah Choe, Sung-Il Cho
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    Ana Raquel Madureira, Adriana Pereira, Manuela Pintado
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Trends in the Incidence of Scrub Typhus: The Fastest Growing Vector-Borne Disease in Korea
Mi Ae Jeong, Seung-Ki Youn, Young-Kwon Kim, Hyungmin Lee, Sun-Ja Kim, Aeree Sohn
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(3):166-169.   Published online June 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.04.007
  • 1,843 View
  • 20 Download
  • 14 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Scrub typhus, also called tsutsugamushi disease, is classified as a Group 3 disease in Korea according to the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance Systems. It is an infectious disease transmitted to humans through the bite of mites that are infected with an intracellular parasite called Orientia tsutsugamushi (Family: Rickettsiaceae). This study aims to identify the demographic characteristics of the infected cases according to profession, region, gender, and onset period and provide a basic data for prevention and control of the disease in the infected patients. Between 2001 and 2010, 16,741 men (36.3%) and 29,373 women (63.7%) were reported to have been infected with scrub typhus, with men being 1.6 times less infected than women. When classified according to age, it was found that 4421 persons (9.6%) were under 40 years of age; 6601 (13.1%) in their 40s; 9714 (21.1%) in their 50s; 13,067 (28.3%) in 60s; 10,128 (22.0%) in their 70s; and 2723 (5.9%) aged 80 or more. The elderly (60 years or older) represented more than half of the infected cases. When the infections were classified according to region, it was found that the county residents had the major share of infection, with a total of 1583 infected cases (59.85).

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Review Article
Travel-Associated Chikungunya Cases in South Korea during 2009–2010
Go Woon Cha, Jung Eun Cho, Eun Ju Lee, Young Ran Ju, Myung Guk Han, Chan Park, Young Eui Jeong
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(3):170-175.   Published online June 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.04.008
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Chikungunya (CHIK) has been classified as a communicable disease group IV in South Korea since late 2010. Based on this, we investigated the extent of imported cases of CHIK in dengue-suspected individuals returning from dengue-endemic regions.
Methods
A total of 486 dengue-suspected serum samples were screened for CHIK by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Further RT-PCR-positive samples were used for the viral culture, and CHIK was subsequently confirmed by sequence analysis of the culture samples.
Results
Five out of 107 dengue-positive samples were found to be positive for CHIK and 15 out of 379 dengue-negative samples were found to be positive for CHIK by immunoglobulin M ELISA. Further, a CHIK virus was isolated from one of the two RT-PCR-positive sera by cell culture and confirmed by sequence analysis.
Conclusion
The present study documents the first evidence of travel-associated CHIK infection in South Korea. Considering the intense international traffic between countries, our finding emphasizes the urgent need for active patient and vector surveillance for timely response to reduce the introduction of CHIK in Korea.

Citations

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Corrigendum
Corrigendum to “A Comparison of Subtyping Methods for Differentiating Salmonella enteric Serovar Enteritidis Isolates Obtained from Food and Human Sources” [Volume 4, Issue 1, February 2013, Pages 27–33]
Ji-Yeon Hyeon, Jung-Whan Chon, Jun-Ho Park, Moo-Sang Kim, Young-Hee Oh, In-Soo Choi, Kun-Ho Seo
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(3):176-176.   Published online June 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.05.002
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PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives